Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
Health Promot J Austr ; 2022 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763230

ABSTRACT

ISSUE ADDRESSED: High levels of testing are crucial for minimising the spread of COVID-19. The aim of this study is to investigate what prevents people from getting a COVID-19 test when they are experiencing respiratory symptoms. METHODS: Semi-structured, qualitative interviews were conducted with 14 purposively sampled adults between 20 November 2020 and 3 March 2021 in two capital cities of Australia and analysed thematically. The analysis included people who reported having respiratory symptoms but who did not undergo a COVID-19 test. RESULTS: Participants appraised risks of having COVID-19, of infecting others or being infected whilst attending a testing site. They often weighed these appraisals against practical considerations of knowing where and how to get tested, inconvenience or financial loss. CONCLUSIONS: Clear public health messages communicating the importance of testing, even when symptoms are minor, may improve testing rates. Increasing the accessibility of testing centres, such as having them at transport hubs is important, as is providing adequate information about testing locations and queue lengths. SO WHAT?: The findings of our study suggest that more needs to be done to encourage people to get tested for COVID-19, especially when symptoms are minor. Clear communication about the importance of testing, along with easily accessible testing clinics, and financial support for those concerned about financial impacts may improve testing rates.

2.
Soc Sci Med ; 291: 114502, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1720945

ABSTRACT

Childhood vaccine refusal is a globally contentious topic, with some jurisdictions addressing it with punitive policies. Media discourse influences how solutions are framed by implying blame - a process known as framing. We examined Australian media discourse on vaccine rejection over a period in which mandatory childhood vaccination policies were discussed and introduced, focusing on the common Australian pejorative term 'anti-vaxxer'. We mapped frequency of use from January 2008 to December 2018. We then searched Factiva for print media articles on childhood vaccination and parents published in that period, searching separately for articles using and not using 'anti-vaxxer' and variants. We constructed a set of 85 articles that did, and 85 articles date-matched that did not use the term to make comparisons and conducted a frame analysis of each set. 'Anti-vaxxer' was absent in Australian media discourse 2008-2010, rising to a peak of 247 articles using the term at the height of legislative change in 2017. Parents were framed as: 1) deviant "others"; 2) ignorant and in need of informing; 3) vulnerable and in need of protection from anti-vaccination activists; 4) thoughtful, critical, informed, and in need of agency and respect; 5) entitled, privileged and selfish; and finally, 6) lacking access to vaccination, rather than being unwilling. Articles using 'anti-vax' terms were more likely to negatively characterise non-vaccinating parents, while articles not including this language were more likely to frame them as thoughtful or lacking access. This study clearly demonstrates strategic use of pejoratives in the Australian mass media around a time of pressure for legislative change and conflation of anti-vaccination activists with non-vaccinating parents. We suggest fundamental changes to how non-vaccination is framed and dealt with in the media to curb polarization and fostering more respectful dialogue, and better social and public health outcomes.


Subject(s)
Vaccination Refusal , Vaccines , Australia , Humans , Mass Media , Vaccination
3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-320117

ABSTRACT

Background: Communities with low vaccination rates are at greater risk during outbreaks of vaccine preventable diseases. Most Australian parents support vaccines, but some refuse and are often judged harshly by their community, especially during an outbreak. We sought the perspectives of Australian public health experts on the key issues faced when managing a measles outbreak in an area with high anti-vaccination sentiment. Methods: A measles outbreak scenario formed the basis of a 3-round modified Delphi process to identify key practitioner concerns in relation to parents/carers who don’t follow the recommended vaccination schedule. We surveyed a range of professionals in the field: policymakers, infectious disease experts, immunisation program staff, and others involved in delivering childhood vaccinations, to identify key priorities when responding to an outbreak in a community with low vaccination coverage. Results: Findings indicate that responses to measles outbreaks in communities with high anti-vaccination sentiment are motivated by concerns about the potential for a much larger outbreak event. The highest operational priority is to isolate infected children. The two most highly ranked practical issues are mistrust from non-vaccinating members of the local region and combatting misinformation about vaccines. Trying to change minds of such individuals is not a priority during an outbreak, nor is vaccinating their children. Using media and social media to provide information about the outbreak and measures the public can take to limit the spread of the disease was a focus. Conclusions: Our findings provide a deeper understanding of the challenges faced during an outbreak and priorities for communicating with communities where there is a high level of anti-vaccination sentiment. In the context of a global pandemic, the results of this study also have implications for managing public health responses to community transmission of SARS-CoV-2, if and when a safe and effective vaccine becomes widely available.

4.
Vaccine ; 40(6): 945-952, 2022 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586271

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted vaccination services and raised the risk of a global resurgence of preventable diseases. We assessed the extent of and reasons for missed or delayed vaccinations (hereafter 'missed') in middle- and high-income countries in the early months of the pandemic. METHODS: From May to June 2020, participants completed an online survey on missed vaccination. Analyses separated missed childhood and adult vaccination in middle-and high-income countries. RESULTS: Respondents were 28,429 adults from 26 middle- and high-income countries. Overall, 9% of households had missed a vaccine, and 13% were unsure. More households in middle- than high-income countries reported missed childhood vaccination (7.6% vs. 3.0%) and missed adult vaccination (9.6% vs. 3.4%, both p < .05). Correlates of missed childhood vaccination in middle-income countries included COVID-19 risk factors (respiratory and cardiovascular diseases), younger age, male sex, employment, psychological distress, larger household size, and more children. In high-income countries, correlates of missed childhood vaccination also included immunosuppressive conditions, but did not include sex or household size. Fewer correlates were associated with missed adult vaccination other than COVID-19 risk factors and psychological distress. Common reasons for missed vaccinations were worry about getting COVID-19 at the vaccination clinic (15%) or when leaving the house (11%). Other reasons included no healthcare provider recommendation, clinic closure, and wanting to save services for others. INTERPRETATION: Missed vaccination was common and more prevalent in middle- than high-income countries. Missed vaccination could be mitigated by emphasizing COVID-19 safety measures in vaccination clinics, ensuring free and accessible immunization, and clear healthcare provider recommendations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Child , Developed Countries , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination
5.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-294433

ABSTRACT

Background: Behavioural and social drivers (BeSD) of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among Australian healthcare workers (HCW) living and working in regional areas are not well studied. Understanding local HCW’s COVID-19 risk perceptions and potential barriers to COVID-19 vaccine uptake is crucial to supporting rollout. We aimed to understand COVID-19 vaccine drivers among HCW in Central Queensland (CQ), Australia.<br><br>Method: A cross sectional online survey of HCWs in CQ between 17 May and 31 May 2021, based on BeSD framework adapted from the World Health Organization Data for Action guidance consisting of the five instrument domains: what people think and feel;social processes;motivations;practical issues;and vaccination uptake.<br><br>Results: Of 240 HCWs within CQHHS who responded, 78% were female. 64% percent of participating HCWs received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, and of those who had not yet received a vaccine, 53% said they were willing to receive one. Factors associated with vaccine acceptance included: belief that the vaccine was important for their health (81%;OR: 7.2, CI: 3.5-15.5), belief that their family and friends want them to have the vaccine (64%;OR: 6.7, 2.9-16.7), trust in the vaccine (72%;OR: 6.4, CI: 3.5-12.0), confidence in being able to answer patient questions about the vaccine (99%).<br><br>Conclusions: These findings suggest a combination of communications and educational material framed around the benefits and social norms of vaccination, along with materials addressing vaccine safety concerns will encourage HCW to take up a COVID-19 vaccine.<br><br>Funding Information: This work was supported by a Queensland Advancing Clinical Research Fellowship awarded to Prof. Gulam Khandaker by Queensland Health's Health Innovation, Investment and Research Office (HIRO), Office of the Director-General.<br><br>Declaration of Interests: Professor Gulam Khandaker has received funding from Sanofi Pasteur for conducting research other than this. All other authors declare no competing interests.<br><br>Ethics Approval Statement: Electronic consent was obtained from all participants. Ethical approval was obtained from the CQHHS Human Research Ethics Committee (LNR2021QCQ69608).

8.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 578, 2021 04 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175311

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Communities with low vaccination rates are at greater risk during outbreaks of vaccine preventable diseases. Most Australian parents support vaccines, but some refuse and are often judged harshly by their community, especially during an outbreak. We sought the perspectives of Australian public health experts on the key issues faced when managing a measles outbreak in an area with high anti-vaccination sentiment. METHODS: A measles outbreak scenario formed the basis of a 3-round modified Delphi process to identify key practitioner concerns in relation to parents/carers who don't follow the recommended vaccination schedule. We surveyed a range of professionals in the field: policymakers, infectious disease experts, immunisation program staff, and others involved in delivering childhood vaccinations, to identify key priorities when responding to an outbreak in a community with low vaccination coverage. RESULTS: Findings indicate that responses to measles outbreaks in communities with high anti-vaccination sentiment are motivated by concerns about the potential for a much larger outbreak event. The highest operational priority is to isolate infected children. The two most highly ranked practical issues are mistrust from non-vaccinating members of the local region and combatting misinformation about vaccines. Trying to change minds of such individuals is not a priority during an outbreak, nor is vaccinating their children. Using media and social media to provide information about the outbreak and measures the public can take to limit the spread of the disease was a focus. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide a deeper understanding of the challenges faced during an outbreak and priorities for communicating with communities where there is a high level of anti-vaccination sentiment. In the context of a global pandemic, the results of this study also have implications for managing public health responses to community transmission of SARS-CoV-2, as COVID-19 vaccines becomes widely available.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Disease Outbreaks , Measles Vaccine , Measles , Public Health , Vaccination , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Child , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans , Measles/epidemiology , Measles/prevention & control , Measles Vaccine/administration & dosage , Vaccination/psychology
9.
Pharmacy (Basel) ; 8(2)2020 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-165165

ABSTRACT

This study assessed Australian Hajj pilgrims' knowledge, attitude and practices throughout their Hajj journey to understand their health behaviors, use of preventative measures and development of illness symptoms. A prospective cohort study with data collection at three phases (before, during and after Hajj) was conducted among Australian pilgrims between August and December 2015. Baseline data were collected from 421 pilgrims before Hajj, with 391 providing follow-up data during Hajj and 300 after their home return. Most participants (78% [329/421]) received one or more recommended vaccines; travel agents' advice was the main factor affecting vaccination uptake. Most participants (69% [270/391]) practiced hand hygiene with soap and sanitizers frequently, followed by disposable handkerchief use (36% [139/391]) and washing hands with water only (28% [111/391]). During Hajj 74% (288/391) of participants reported one or more illness symptoms, 86% (248/288) of these symptoms were respiratory. Cough was less often reported among pilgrims who received vaccinations, cleaned their hands with soap or alcoholic hand rubs, while a runny nose was less common among those who frequently washed their hands with plain water but was more common among those who used facemasks. This study reveals that most Australian Hajj pilgrims complied with key preventative measures, and that tour group operators' advice played an important role in compliance. Pilgrims who were vaccinated and practiced hand hygiene were less likely to report infection symptoms.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL