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2.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 28(13):177-180, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2162893

ABSTRACT

As COVID-19 cases increased during the first weeks of the pandemic in South Africa, the National Institute of Communicable Diseases requested assistance with epidemiologic and surveillance expertise from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention South Africa. By leveraging its existing relationship with the National Institute of Communicable Diseases for >2 months, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention South Africa supported data capture and file organization, data quality reviews, data analytics, laboratory strengthening, and the development and review of COVID-19 guidance This case study provides an account of the resources and the technical, logistical, and organizational capacity leveraged to support a rapid response to the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa.

3.
Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Societ ; 15:15, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2161105

ABSTRACT

In symptomatic children tested for COVID-19 by PCR during both Delta and Omicron surges, Cycle threshold value medians and distributions in anterior nares (AN) and nasopharyngeal (NP) samples were very similar, suggesting similar yield of NP and AN sampling for SARS-CoV-2 PCR testing in symptomatic children.

4.
Infect Dis Health ; 27:S14-5, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed Central | ID: covidwho-2158936
6.
Pediatric Diabetes ; 23(Supplement 31):48, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2137177

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The use of continuous glucose monitors (CGM) and insulin pumps (PUMP) have been associated with improved outcomes in type 1 diabetes (T1D) care. Therefore, disengaging from these devices represents a risk for worsening health outcomes. Objective(s): We sought to evaluate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on device disengagement rates by race and ethnicity. Method(s): This retrospective cohort study Pre-COVID-19 [n = 15,838] + peri-COVID-19 ([n = 14,799]) used EMR data from 15 sites (i.e., 3 adult and 12 pediatric diabetes centers) within the T1D Exchange Quality Improvement Collaborative. We identified individuals using at least one Advanced Diabetes Technology (ADT [PUMP or CGM]) at their most recent visit. Individuals who continued to use that technology for at least two subsequent visits were classified as engaged. Those who reported not using ADT in two subsequent visits were classified as disengaged. Result(s): Comparing pre-COVID-19 (January 2017-March 2020) to peri-COVID-19 (April 2020-2021) time periods, we observed increases in disengagement among non-Hispanic White (NHW;42% to 45%, p = 0.03) and Hispanic (12% to 19%, p < 0.001) individuals. We found no difference among NH Black (NHB;61% to 62%, p = 0.7) individuals. Conclusion(s): The pandemic has presented self-care challenges for individuals with T1D, including continued use of ADT. NHB individuals exhibited the highest disengagement rates overall, while NHW/Hispanic individuals experienced significant pandemic-related increases in disengagement. Future research should evaluate the relative impact of intrinsic (i.e., patient-level) versus extrinsic (i.e., family-, environment-, and system-level) factors associated with race-/ethnicity- based differences in rate of disengagement.

7.
American Journal of Perinatology ; 30:30, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2133772

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 continues to have a profound impact on infant healthcare and health outcomes. In this study, we aimed to characterize the social impact of the first COVID-19 lockdown on families in a neonatal follow-up program (NFP). Given the ongoing increased use of telehealth across the medicine, we also evaluated for patient-level differences in virtual visit rates to identify patients at risk of follow-up challenges.

8.
Veterinary Record ; 190(9):374, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2128319
10.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2047032

ABSTRACT

Somewhat uniquely, in our department, we teach a version of engineering design to each of 4 year groups registered for the M.Eng (masters in engineering) in chemical engineering. These design projects culminate with a final-year group design, but students are introduced to group design in their second week of their first year of study. The first-year design project deliverables are assessed, but equally the design project serves as an opportunity for students to get to know one another through organised group work and serves as an introduction to the concept of design in a chemical engineering context. The first-year design project has traditionally been taught face-to-face (F2F), with the design project taught in 2 cohorts of ~75 students to accommodate the students enrolled in the first year of the programme (approximately 150-160 in total). Lockdown restrictions last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic (COVID) meant that the design project was redesigned as a remote teaching model which was delivered very successfully using Microsoft TEAMS. This academic year, some restrictions have lifted and as a result of which a hybrid model for teaching the first-year design project has been adopted. In this paper, this hybrid model of teaching is discussed along with the challenges faced in designing and delivering it. For example, one of the main challenges we faced was how to keep students and staff safe when they were on campus, which was not a concern pre-pandemic. Important decisions have been made about how to vary assessment measures [1] for example by having students give a pre-recorded, non-assessed group presentation, and to then use the constructive feedback to prepare a live, assessed, group presentation. Similarly, we were obliged to re-consider how best to support peer-to-peer collaboration [2] with students being set collective goals, and meeting face-to-face on a group rotational basis once a week with contribution and attendance being periodically monitored. Furthermore, students were encouraged to make use of sanitised study space in the department, and to actively converse through TEAMS as and when appropriate. Additionally, challenges arose with managing academic support effectively with most of the support offered face-to-face through team teaching in blocks. Other challenges faced included ensuring the available teaching space could be kept safe [3], and that time could be managed effectively. The disadvantages and benefits of adopting a hybrid model of teaching are explored from both staff and student viewpoints, by critically reflecting on student evaluations for the module and the perceptions of staff retrospectively. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022

11.
Journal of Neuromuscular Diseases ; 9:S213-S214, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2043404

ABSTRACT

The UK Myotonic Dystrophy Patient Registry is a patient self-enrolling online database collecting clinical and genetic information about myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2). The registry was established in May 2012 with support from Muscular Dystrophy UK and the Myotonic Dystrophy Support Group and is coordinated Newcastle University. The registry aims to facilitate academic and clinical research, better characterise and understand DM, and disseminate information relating to upcoming studies and research advancements. The registry is used to capture longitudinal, selfreported data through an online portal available to patients and clinicians. Where specialised clinical or genetic information is required, the neuromuscular specialist involved in the patient's care can be invited to provide some additional information and the patient can select them from a pre-populated list at the registration stage. The registry is a Core Member of the TREAT-NMD Global Registries Network for DM1. Between May 2012 and January 2022, there were 834 patient registrations. On average there are 5 new registrations per month. For those reporting a clinical diagnosis, 96% have DM1 (of which 14% have a diagnosis of congenital DM) and 4% have DM2. Overall, 40% of patients have had genetic confirmation of their condition provided. The registry has previously supported almost 30 research enquiries to date. Since 2020, the registry has facilitated 11 enquiries including an industry enquiry, three COVID-19 surveys, and various surveys capturing information on dysphagia, pregnancy, patient preferences for future treatments and the patient/ caregiver experience. The registry continues to be a versatile, cost-effective research tool, helping facilitate and advance a range of DM research. Additional work continues to be done to improve reporting of genetic information on the registry and there are future data linkage plans between the registry and the Newcastle Research Biobank for Rare and Neuromuscular Diseases.

12.
HemaSphere ; 6:1596-1597, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2032166

ABSTRACT

Background: The bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (VRd) regimen is a standard of care for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM). Belantamab mafodotin (belamaf) is a B-cell maturation antigen-binding antibody-drug conjugate that eliminates myeloma cells by a multimodal mechanism: direct cell kill and anti-myeloma tumor immune response. Belamaf has demonstrated deep and durable responses as a monotherapy in the DREAMM-2 study of patients (pts) with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM). Preclinical evidence of belamaf in combination with bortezomib or lenalidomide suggests enhanced anti-myeloma activity, providing rationale for this treatment combination. Aims: To evaluate the safety and tolerability of this combination in adult pts with transplant-ineligible (TI) NDMM and establish the recommended Phase III dose. Methods: DREAMM-9 (NCT04091126) is an ongoing Phase I, open-label, randomized study of belamaf + VRd. The belamaf dose cohorts currently being evaluated are Cohort 1 (1.9 mg/kg Q3/4W), Cohort 2 (1.4 mg/kg Q6/8W), Cohort 3 (1.9 mg/kg Q6/8W), Cohort 4 (1.0 mg/kg Q3/4W), and Cohort 5 (1.4 mg/kg Q3/4W). Belamaf is given with VRd Q3W until Cycle 8, and with Rd Q4W thereafter. After evaluation of safety data for Cohort 1, Cohorts 2-5 were opened in parallel and enrolled pts were randomized 1:1:1:1. Primary endpoint is safety. Secondary endpoints include efficacy, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK). Results: As of data cutoff (07 Dec 2021), 64 pts were analyzed across all cohorts. Median age (range) was 73.0 (51- 88) years, 55% were male, 80% were white, 8% had extramedullary disease, 59% were International Staging System stage II or III, 20% had amp1q, and 17% had high-risk cytogenetics (≥1 of: t(4;14), t(14;16), del17p). The median duration of follow-up varied: Cohort 1 (17.4 months [mo]), Cohort 2 (5.9 mo), Cohort 3 (6.1 mo), Cohort 4 (4.7 mo), Cohort 5 (5.8 mo). Median number of belamaf cycles were: Cohort 1 (6), Cohort 2 (3), Cohort 3 (3.5), Cohort 4 (4.5), and Cohort 5 (5). Most common adverse events (AEs) across cohorts included thrombocytopenia (49%), constipation (43%), diarrhea (32%), and peripheral sensory neuropathy (30%). AEs related to study treatment were experienced by 61 (97%) pts. Belamaf-related grade 3/4 AEs occurred in 24 (38%) pts. Belamaf dose reductions occurred in 11 (18%) pts, with dose delays in 10 (16%) pts. Three pts experienced a fatal severe AE (unrelated to study treatment);2 due to COVID-19 infection, 1 due to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Early deep responses were observed;67-92% pts achieved ≥very good partial response (VGPR) (Table), with median time to VGPR of 2.1-2.9 months across cohorts. Of pts with ≥VGPR, 17 were minimal residual disease (MRD) negative, 10 in Cohort 1. As of data cutoff, 8-75% of pts achieved best response of complete response (CR) or stringent CR (sCR). Grade 3 corneal exam findings were reported in 25-58% of pts;grade 3 visual acuity changes were reported in 21-75% of pts. No grade 4 corneal exam findings or visual acuity changes were reported in pts receiving belamaf Q6/8W, compared with 0-17% and 0-8%, respectively, in the Q3/4W cohorts. Belamaf PK profile was similar to that in pts with RRMM, accounting for baseline characteristics. Image: Summary/Conclusion: Belamaf + VRd demonstrated high response rates in pts with TI NDMM, with a high rate of MRD negativity indicating deep responses. No new safety signals were observed relative to DREAMM-2. Study is ongoing to evaluate the safety and efficacy of variable dose intensities of belamaf in combination with VRd.

14.
Pediatrics ; 149, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003146

ABSTRACT

Background: While the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 has remained low among newborns, there is increasing evidence that the COVID-19 pandemic impacted healthcare for families with infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). However, little is known about the impact of COVID-19 on families with infants discharged from the NICU. During the initial pandemic shutdown, our Neonatal Follow-Up Program (NFP) transitioned to a virtual platform and implemented a survey about new/worsened obstacles families might be facing due to the pandemic as standard of care. We aimed to: 1) evaluate for patient-level differences in virtual neonatal follow-up visit rates;and 2) characterize the social impact of the pandemic on families followed via a large, urban NFP. Methods: All infants scheduled for NFP visits during our telemedicine epoch (March 13, 2020- July 31, 2020) were eligible for inclusion. We compared the family demographics and medical history of infants whose televisits occurred to those for whom televisits did not occur as scheduled. Secondly, we conducted a descriptive analysis of caregiver responses to the pandemic-specific challenges survey. Given the known disproportionate impact of SARS-CoV-2 on communities of color, we also assessed for differences in responses by self-identified race. Data was manually extracted by three coders from the electronic medical record who showed high interrater agreement. Results: After excluding visits cancelled by the provider team, we found 499 clinic encounters for 678 scheduled visits during the study period (i.e. a show-rate of 73.6%). When comparing patients who completed their virtual visit to those who did not, we found no differences in infants' sex, birthweight or gestational age at birth, nor in their reliance on medical technology at discharge. (Table 1). There were also no differences by caregiver self-reported race/ethnicity, but infants whose visits did not occur were more often covered by public insurance. (Table 1). In addition, 43.9% of caregivers reported that their employment had changed since the onset of the shutdown and 6.1% reported housing changes. (Table 2). Eight percent of families endorsed having trouble accessing at least one basic infant necessity (i.e. formula, diapers or medical supplies) due to cost issues and 10% of families endorsed having trouble accessing such necessities due to availability. Non-Hispanic Black caregivers reported this challenge and other infant food-related challenges more often than non-Hispanic White caregivers. Conclusion: We found socioeconomic disparities with respect to virtual follow-up visit rates after discharge from the NICU during the initial COVID-19 shutdown. In addition to navigating the discharge of their infant, families also reported pandemic-enhanced stressors related to difficulty accessing basic infant needs as well as employment and housing changes. Our study highlights the importance of proactive strategies to screen for and mitigate the unique economic vulnerabilities of families discharged from the NICU even beyond the pandemic. (Table Presented).

15.
HemaSphere ; 6(SUPPL 2):19, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1915868

ABSTRACT

Background: The bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (VRd) regimen is a SoC for NDMM. Belamaf, a B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA)-targeting antibody-drug conjugate, demonstrated durable responses in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Preclinical studies of belamaf in combination with bortezomib/ lenalidomide suggest enhanced antimyeloma activity. We report preliminary findings of belamaf + VRd for patients with TI NDMM. Materials and Methods: DREAMM-9 (NCT04091126) is an ongoing Phase I, open label, randomized, dose and schedule evaluation trial. Adults with TI NDMM and ECOG status 0-2 are eligible. VRd is administered Q3W until Cycle 8, followed by lenalidomide + dexamethasone (Rd) Q4W. Belamaf + VRd is administered until Cycle 8, and with Rd thereafter. The currently evaluated belamaf dose cohorts are: Cohort 1 (1.9 mg/kg Q3/4W), Cohort 2 (1.4 mg/kg Q6/8W), Cohort 3 (1.9 mg/ kg Q6/8W), Cohort 4 (1.0 mg/kg Q3/4W), and Cohort 5 (1.4 mg/kg Q3/4W). Primary endpoint is safety. Secondary endpoints include efficacy, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK). Results: Overall 36 patients were treated across the 5 cohorts. The median (range) age was 74.0 (63-80) years;56% patients were male, 17 (47%) had stage 2 disease, 3 (8%) had extramedullary disease, 6 (17%) patients had high risk cytogenetic abnormalities;the median number of belamaf cycles ranged from 1-9. No new safety signals were observed. Across Cohorts 1-5, all patients experienced AEs related to study treatment;1 patient in Cohort 1 died due to COVID-19 infection. The most common AEs leading to dose modification were thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, and corneal events. Patients in Cohort 2 and 3 had the lowest number of Grade ≥3 corneal events (3 and 2 events, respectively). All 12 patients in Cohort 1, all 6 in Cohorts 3 and 5, and 5/6 patients in Cohorts 2 and 4 have responded to the treatment;≥half of patients in each cohort achieved very good partial response or better. As of data cut-off, 3/12 patients in Cohort 1, 2/6 in Cohort 4, and 1/6 patients each in Cohorts 3 and 5 remained in complete response. Belamaf PK profile was similar to that observed in patients with RRMM taking into consideration baseline patients characteristics. Conclusions: Preliminary data suggest addition of belamaf to VRd did not reveal new safety signals and demonstrates high response rates, albeit with short follow-up. The trial is ongoing to confirm safety and evaluate the efficacy of belamaf + VRd. .

16.
Information Technology & People ; : 33, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1868480

ABSTRACT

Purpose The need for accelerating innovation is exacerbated as organizations struggle to either adapt or perish in this unforgiving condition due to the COVID-19 disruption. To address this issue, many organizations have embraced employee-driven participatory innovation to survive and thrive albeit the uncertainties. This study aims to investigate the role of enterprise social media (ESM) in supporting and facilitating these efforts. Design/methodology/approach This study first identified the underlying mechanisms that allow ESM use to foster and maintain participatory innovation and then reexamined how these mechanisms played out during the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions. The data was collected through a questionnaire in two phases, before and during work-from-home mandates, and the results were analyzed and compared to capture similarities and differences. Findings The results revealed that innovation culture and management support mediated the effects of ESM use on three measures of innovation productivity in both conditions. Interestingly, the effect of ESM use was more prominent in driving innovation in the work-from-home condition. This effect was not limited to the direct effect of ESM use on innovation productivity but on innovation culture and management support as well. Originality/value The results suggest that ESM offer a potentially useful path to support and enable employees to participate in the innovation processes, especially when they work remotely or in a distributed team. More generally, this paper should be of interest to researchers and practitioners interested in understanding, implementing and evaluating enterprise social software applications and encouraging employee-driven participatory innovation.

17.
Journal of Chemical Education ; 99(4):1642-1650, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1867994

ABSTRACT

A classroom based Problem Based Learning (PBL) activity was adapted to run as a remote activity during the COVID-19 pandemicusing an approach described as virtual Problem Based Learning (vPBL).vPBL is based on (i) identification of a suitable learning platform thatsupports collaborative working in a way that mimics the classroom basedactivity and provides additionalflexibility for teams to work together, and (ii)adaptation of the problem structure to provide additional time for students towork together and additional facilitated support where needed. Studentperformance and self-reported levels of transferrable skills development in thevPBL activity were as good as they were in the PBL version of the sameactivity. Furthermore, the transition to vPBL appears to have no negativeimpact on student learning and development. Although there was evidence tosuggest students in the vPBL cohort collaborate between sessions to a similarextent as their colleagues who learnt primarily through interactive online lectures, there was evidence of greater use of somecollaborative digital learning tools (audio and video chat and desktop and file sharing) in the vPBL cohort.

18.
Journal of Pain ; 23(5):5-6, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1851619

ABSTRACT

Chronic pain produces the largest non-fatal burden of disease, yet our understanding of factors that contribute to the transition from acute chronic pain are poorly understood. The Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures Program (A2CPS) is a longitudinal, multi-site observational study to identify biomarkers (individual or biosignature combinations) that predict susceptibility or resilience to the development of chronic pain after surgery (knee replacement or thoracotomy). Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, however, travel between sites was restricted just as the study was preparing to begin enrollment. Here, we present multiple training protocol adaptations that were successfully implemented to facilitate remote research-related training. The A2CPS consortium includes 2 Multisite Clinical Centers (MCCs, 10 recruitment sites), a Clinical Coordinating Center (CCC), a Data Integration and Resource Center (DIRC), 3 Omics Data Generation Centers, and representation from the NIH Pain Consortium, Common Fund, and National Institute of Drug Abuse. The A2CPS is collecting candidate and exploratory biomarkers including pain, fatigue, function, sleep, psychosocial factors, quantitative sensory testing (QST), genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics, and brain imaging. The CCC adapted the A2CPS training and evaluation techniques for certifying the MCCs to ensure competency with recruitment, assessments (surveys, QST, function), and data entry across clinical sites using a combination of virtual training sessions, standardized quantitative measurements, video demonstrations, and reliability assessments. Staff at data collection sites have been successfully certified in all psychophysical assessments (QST, function). This included use of stop watches and metronomes to ensure standard application rates, completion of application-rate and inter-rater-reliability worksheets at each clinical site, designation of site-specific master examiners, training rubrics and video demonstration to verify competency was harmonized across sites. Adaptation of training protocols to a remote format enabled initiation of subject enrollment while maintaining documented standards with high data completion rates for surveys and assessments. The A2CPS Consortium is supported by the National Institutes of Health Common Fund, which is managed by the OD/Office of Strategic Coordination (OSC). Consortium components include: Clinical Coordinating Center (UO1NS077179), Data Integration and Resource Center (UO1NS077352), Omics Data Generation Centers (U54DA049116, U54DA049115, U54DA09113), and Multisite Clinical Centers: MCC 1 (UM1NS112874) and MCC 2 (UM1NS118922). Postdoctoral support for GB provided by the National Institutes of Neurological Disease and Stroke (NINDS) of the NIH under Award Number U24NS112873-03S2.

19.
International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia ; 50:52, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1814540
20.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(9): 755-758, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1747302

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are significant drug-drug interactions between human immunodeficiency virus antiretroviral therapy and intranasal steroids, leading to high serum concentrations of iatrogenic steroids and subsequently Cushing's syndrome. METHOD: All articles in the literature on cases of intranasal steroid and antiretroviral therapy interactions were reviewed. Full-length manuscripts were analysed and the relevant data were extracted. RESULTS: A literature search and further cross-referencing yielded a total of seven reports on drug-drug interactions of intranasal corticosteroids and human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors, published between 1999 and 2019. CONCLUSION: The use of potent steroids metabolised via CYP3A4, such as fluticasone and budesonide, are not recommended for patients taking ritonavir or cobicistat. Mometasone should be used cautiously with ritonavir because of pharmacokinetic similarities to fluticasone. There was a delayed onset of symptoms in many cases, most likely due to the relatively lower systemic bioavailability of intranasal fluticasone.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects , Cushing Syndrome/chemically induced , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Protease Inhibitors/adverse effects , HIV , Administration, Intranasal , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adult , Cobicistat/administration & dosage , Cobicistat/adverse effects , Drug Interactions , Fluticasone/administration & dosage , Fluticasone/adverse effects , HIV Protease Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Humans , Male , Ritonavir/administration & dosage , Ritonavir/adverse effects
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