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1.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; JOUR(16), 40.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2092747
2.
International Journal of Education and the Arts ; JOUR(Special Issue 1), 23.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2091452

ABSTRACT

The slogan “I can’t breathe” reverberated in 2020 with the Black Lives Matter movement protests against police brutality and racial injustices in America. As much as there was an uncanny coincidence with that phrase and the root of the COVID-19 pandemic, the immediate association of those words for me, a dance educator in South Africa, was the 2015 #RhodesMustFall national student protests in South Africa. Black students at the University of Cape Town, and eventually across the nation, vehemently protested racism and the suffocating whiteness of their institutions and curricula. Their motto of “We can’t breathe” resonated in our dance studios and lecture halls. Through personal narratives the author aims to reveal multiple ways in which racism can permeate dance teaching and learning and the adverse effects of this abhorrent phenomenon on dancers and dance education. A lacuna in the dance scholarship on race and racism are first-person accounts that provide rich descriptions of individual’s lived experiences with racism in dance. As a step toward healing and transformation, such storytelling is useful for demystifying a phenomenon that is complex and prone to blind spots and denial. © 2022, Pennsylvania State University Libraries. All rights reserved.

3.
Annals of Emergency Medicine ; 80(4, Supplement):S115, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2060363
4.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 40(16), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2005687

ABSTRACT

Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening disruptions have been observed with the COVID-19 pandemic, putting patients at risk for more advanced-stage disease at the time of diagnosis. We estimated the impact of increased use of stool-based tests for screening during the COVID-19 pandemic on near-term clinical outcomes in a simulated United States (US) population. Methods: A previously developed budget impact model was adapted to assess the impact of increasing use of multi-target stool DNA [mt-sDNA] or fecal immunochemical [FIT] tests to offset the COVID-19 related disruption in colonoscopy screening. Adults, ages 50 - 75 years, at average risk for CRC were included over a 3-year time horizon (2020 - 2023) to explore the impact of increased screening for CRC using mt-sDNA or FIT, from the perspective of a US payer. Compared to the base case (S0;85% colonoscopy and 15% non-invasive tests), the estimated number of missed CRCs and advanced adenomas (AAs) were determined for four COVID-19-affected screening scenarios: S1, 9 months of CRC screening at 50% capacity, followed by 21 months at 75% capacity;S2, S1 followed by increasing stool-based testing by an average of 10% over 3-years;S3, 18 months of CRC screening at 50% capacity, followed by 12 months of 75% capacity;and S4, S3 followed by increasing stool-based testing by an average of 13% over 3-years. Results: Increasing the proportional use of mt-sDNA, the detection of AAs improved by 6.0% (Scenario 2 versus 1) to 8.4% (Scenario 4 versus 3) and the number of missed CRCs decreased by 15.1% to 17.3% respectively. Increasing FIT utilization improved the detection of AAs by 3.3% (Scenario 2 versus 1) to 4.6% (Scenario 4 versus 3) and the number of missed CRCs decreased by 12.9% (Scenario 2 versus 1) to 14.9% (Scenario 4 versus 3). Across all scenarios, the number of AAs detected was higher for mt-sDNA than for FIT, and the number of missed CRCs was lower for mt-sDNA than for FIT. Conclusions: Using home-based stool tests for average-risk CRC screening can mitigate the consequences of reduced colonoscopy screening resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Use of mt-sDNA led to fewer missed CRCs and more AAs detected, compared to FIT.

5.
American Journal of Disaster Medicine ; 17(1):41-48, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1975200

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Emergency medical services (EMS) is an invaluable healthcare resource, providing life-saving care in the prehospital setting. During the COVID-19 pandemic, there have been concerns that healthcare resources, including EMS, would be overwhelmed by the potential surge in critically ill patients. This study seeks to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on EMS utilization in the state of Maryland. METHODS: A retrospective review of data from the Maryland Emergency Medical Services Data System was performed. EMS call volumes were compared from March 1 to August 31 in the years 2018, 2019, and 2020. In addition, adult cases from the three time periods that contained an EMS impression of stroke, cardiac arrest, asthma, traumatic injury, ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), sepsis, and overdose were also analyzed. RESULTS: There was a significant decrease in overall EMS call volumes in the state of Maryland in the first 6 months of 2020 compared to the prior 2 years. While the total number of calls decreased, a higher proportion of patients in 2020 had EMS impressions of cardiac arrest, STEMI, stroke, and traumatic injury compared to the previous 2 years. Additionally, there was an increase in termination of resuscitation for out of hospital cardiac arrest. CONCLUSION: In the state of Maryland, overall call volumes decreased, but the proportion of EMS patients with time-sensitive illnesses increased during the COVID-19 pandemic.

6.
CUREUS JOURNAL OF MEDICAL SCIENCE ; 14(6), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1969742

ABSTRACT

Introduction Medical faculty often assume teaching responsibilities without formal training in teaching skills. The purpose of this study was to design, implement, and evaluate boot camp workshop training faculty in basic teaching competencies. We also describe the transition to a virtual format necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods The workshop content was derived from a needs assessment survey and discussion with content experts. Four main content areas were identified: setting expectations, giving feedback, evaluating learners, and teaching in specific settings (outpatient clinics, inpatient wards, procedures/surgery, and small groups). The initial boot camp was a four-hour in-person event. The following year, the boot camp was offered via online videoconference. We used a pre-post survey to assess participant reaction and knowledge acquisition from session content. Results A total of 30 local faculty attended the 2020 in-person boot camp, while 105 faculty from across the state attended the 2021 online boot camp. Statistically significant increases in post-knowledge scores were identified for two sessions in the 2020 boot camp and four sessions in 2021. The participants rated both boot camps favorably with no significant difference between the in-person and online presentations for most ratings but were less satisfied with networking opportunities in the online boot camp. Discussion We describe an effective faculty development boot camp teaching core competencies for medical clinician-educators. We were able to leverage the online teleconferencing platform to deliver the content to a larger number of preceptors at distant sites without sacrificing outcomes of participant satisfaction and improvement in knowledge scores. The online model allowed busy clinicians to participate while multitasking. Comments also highlighted the importance of having an engaged moderator during the online event. Conclusions Many medical schools utilize preceptors in distant locations. We demonstrated the feasibility of reaching a much larger and geographically widespread group of clinical preceptors using a virtual format while still showing improvement in knowledge scores relating to workshop content. For future faculty development, we propose that hybrid models with both in-person and virtual components will be effective in meeting the needs of a geographically distributed faculty.

7.
Journal of Criminal Psychology ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1909127

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This paper aims to explore the use of low intensity in-cell workbooks within a psychological therapies service for male prisoners, an intervention adapted for use during the COVID-19 pandemic. It seeks to explore the effectiveness of the intervention in reducing psychological distress, explore individuals’ progression through the service following engagement with the workbooks and, finally, to understand individual’s experiences of the intervention through evaluating feedback provided. Design/methodology/approach: CORE-10 scores from 66 male prisoners at a Category C prison were evaluated pre and post completion of an adapted in-cell workbook intervention, to explore the potential effectiveness of the intervention in reducing psychological distress. Qualitative feedback given by participants was also explored to understand individual’s experiences of engaging with the intervention. Findings: Evaluation of 66 male prisoners revealed significant reductions in psychological distress on the CORE-10. Findings demonstrated that over half of men included in the evaluation were “stepped-up” for further interventions as per the stepped-care treatment model. Feedback forms highlighted the value of the therapeutic relationship and a “something versus nothing” approach. Research limitations/implications: The paper considers several limitations to the research approach, of which future studies should seek to explore when carrying out similar research. Practical implications: The paper includes implications for the use of low intensity self-help interventions in prison psychological services, during a time when the provision of face-to-face interventions was limited due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Originality/value: The paper explores the use of self-help materials in psychological treatment settings, of which there is very little research on in prisons. In addition, the paper contributes to the body of research on psychological well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

8.
Value in health : the journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research ; 25(7):S310-S310, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1904807
9.
Embase;
Preprint in English | EMBASE | ID: ppcovidwho-326993

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has produced five variants of concern (VOC) to date. The important Spike mutation ‘N501Y’ is common to Alpha, Beta, Gamma and Omicron VOC, while the ‘P681R’ is key to Delta’s spread. We have analysed circa 4.2 million SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences from the world’s largest repository ‘Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data (GISAID)’ and demonstrated that these two mutations have cooccurred on the Spike ‘D614G’ mutation background at least 3,678 times from 17 October 2020 to 1 November 2021. In contrast, the Y501-H681 combination, which is common to Alpha and Omicron VOC, is present in circa 1.1 million entries. Two-thirds of the 3,678 cooccurrences were in France, Turkey or US (East Coast), and the rest across 57 other countries. 55.5% and 4.6% of the cooccurrences were Alpha’s Q.4 and Gamma’s P.1.8 sub-lineages acquiring the P681R;10.7% and 3.8% were Delta’s B.1.617.2 lineage and AY.33 sub-lineage acquiring the N501Y;the remaining 10.2% were in other variants. Despite the selective advantages individually conferred by N501Y and P681R, the Y501-R681 combination counterintuitively did not outcompete other variants in every instance we have examined. While this is a relief to worldwide public health efforts, in vitro and in vivo studies are urgently required in the absence of a strong in silico explanation for this phenomenon. This study demonstrates a pipeline to analyse combinations of key mutations from public domain information in a systematic manner and provide early warnings of spread.

10.
European Heart Journal ; 42(SUPPL 1):3097, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1554611

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In an effort to reduce non-essential face to face contact during the COVD pandemic our pacemaker service was restructured in March 2020 to home monitoring only. Home monitors were issued at implant and wound reviews were done remotely via photo messages at one month or if prompted by the patient. Existing patients were given monitors on an ad hoc basis. A dedicated physiologist worked off site on home monitoring clinics. We assessed the impact on our service and on patient experience of these changes one year after implementation. Methods: Baseline characteristics of age at implant and distance of home address from hospital were collected from all patients undergoing pacemaker home monitoring. Patients were surveyed using an adapted version of the Generic Short Patient Experiences Questionnaire (GS-PEQ). Comparison was made with our standard face-to-face follow-up model (1, 3, and 12 months). Results: Data was collected for 326 patients. 233 received a new permanent pacemaker from March 2020 onwards and 93 existing patients were issued with a home monitor. Average age at pacemaker implant was 80.6 years (±9.9 years). The average one-way distance from home to outpatient clinic saved was 15.1 miles (±10.4 miles). 567 face-to-face appointments were saved. On an average day the off-site physiologist reviewed over 100 patient records a day, contacted 10 patients by phone and dictated reports on 20 patients (14 clinic patients and 6 alerts). Of patients surveyed 88% agreed with the statement I feel safe being cared for solely with a remote monitoring service and 84% agreed with the statement I receive the same standard of care via remote monitoring and face-to-face appointments. Time saved by avoiding a face to face appointment was more than 1 hour for 90% of respondents. Respondents requested communication of reassuring monitoring, the ability to contact the pacing team in the event of concerns and clearer instructions for the home monitoring device. Only 34% of newly implanted patients were able to send a photo message of their wound without prompting. We did not get a post procedure photo in 38% and the rest either spoke to us about the wound or had a face-to face visit. There was a significant difference in mean age between those who sent a photo (73.7 years) and those who didn't (81.4 years) (P=0.0006). Conclusion: Rapid role out of a remote monitoring service for permanent pacemakers across a large county was feasible, produced significant savings in clinic time and was well received by patients. There were significant time savings for physiologists and patients. However remote wound monitoring in elderly patients was problematic due to the difficulty of sending photo messages.

11.
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology ; 32:56-57, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1490020

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent extrapulmonary manifestation of COVID-19 and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We investigated alterations in the urine metabolome associated with AKI among patients with COVID-19, with the hypothesis that changes in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) metabolism described in ischemic, toxic, and inflammatory AKI will be also associated with AKI in patients with COVID-19. Methods: This is a case-control study among two adult populations with COVID-19: critically ill patients hospitalized in Boston, Massachusetts, and a general hospitalized patient population in Birmingham, Alabama. Cases had AKI stages 2 or 3 by Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. Controls had no AKI by KDIGO criteria. Metabolites were measured by liquid chromatography -mass spectrometry. Results: 14 cases and 14 controls were included from Boston, and 8 cases and 10 controls included from Birmingham. Urinary quinolinate to tryptophan ratio, an indicator which increases with impaired NAD+ biosynthesis, was higher among cases than controls at each location and pooled across locations (median [IQR]: 1.34 [0.59-2.96] in cases, 0.31 [0.13-1.63] in controls, unadjusted p = 0.0013;p=0.03 in analyses adjusted for age and sex). We identified alterations in tryptophan, nicotinamide, and other components of energy metabolism as well as decreases in purine metabolites which contributed to a distinct urinary metabolomic signature that could reliably differentiate patients with and without AKI (supervised random forest class error: 1/14 for AKI and 1/14 for no AKI groups in Boston, 0/8 for AKI and 0/10 for no AKI groups in Birmingham). Conclusions: Conserved urinary metabolic alterations spanning multiple biochemical pathways distinguish AKI vs. non-AKI in the context of COVID-related hospitalization at two large academic medical centers. AKI is further associated with derangements in NAD+ biosynthesis that suggest impaired energy metabolism in the kidney. Augmenting renal NAD+ by administering biosynthetic precursors may present a novel therapeutic opportunity to mitigate COVID-19 associated AKI.

12.
Colorectal Disease ; n/a(n/a), 2021.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1408736

ABSTRACT

Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a reduced colonoscopy capacity in the UK resulting in increased waiting times for investigation. To increase diagnostic capacity and reduce the risk of diagnostic delay, CT colonography (CTC) and colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) are increasingly being relied upon. Endoscopic assessment and treatment will be required for those patients with large colonic polyps or malignant tumours detected by CTC or CCE, provided they are fit enough to undergo further investigation. The management of patients with intermediate (6-9mm) and diminutive (<6mm) colonic polyps, reported by CTC and CCE, will increasingly be decided by clinicians. Published literature suggests the risk of progression to malignancy of intermediate or diminutive polyps over 3 years is low. Furthermore, the risk of intermediate or diminutive polyps harbouring malignancy is extremely low. The benefits, and timeline, for the removal of these polyps must be carefully considered for patients. We present a pragmatic approach to managing intermediate and diminutive polyps. We suggest delayed polypectomy (up to one year) for patients with intermediate polyps who are likely to benefit. For those patients with diminutive polyps, we advocate further surveillance only for younger patients where clinical concern exists. This meets the aspirations of Realistic Medicine, providing a risk-based approach for patients, while appropriately prioritising resources.

13.
Annals of Emergency Medicine ; 78(2):S29, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1351497

ABSTRACT

Study Objectives: Multiple reports in the US and worldwide demonstrate substantial decreases in ED utilization for serious conditions during the early surge mitigation phase of the COVID-19 crisis. In Ohio, governmental surge mitigation measures were instituted very early, beginning March 3, 2020, prior to its first reported case. Importantly, these recommendations prompted multiple hospital system wide initiatives to prevent “unnecessary” COVID and non-COVID ED and hospital utilization. However, these strategies may have decreased ED visits for more emergent conditions, causing underutilization of needed resources by high-risk ED populations. Opioid overdose (OD) is a leading cause of accidental death in the US and the effect of early surge mitigation on the population at high risk for opioid overdose death is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of early COVID-19 mitigation measures on ED visits for patients at high risk for opioid overdose. Methods: This study was performed in a major urban Midwestern hospital system with IRB approval. We previously created an algorithm using the electronic health record (EHR, Epic systems) to identify patients presenting to the ED with a high risk of a subsequent opioid. The number of patients from March 1, 2020 to June 30, 2020 (COVID-19 mitigation phase) were compared to patients presenting from March 1, 2019 to June 30, 2019. Total ED visits during that time were also determined. Statistical comparison was by Fisher’s exact test. Results: There were 31,809 ED visits during the COVID-19 mitigation phase compared to 44,297 in 2019, a 29% decrease. We identified 188 patients at high risk for subsequent opioid OD during the COVID-19 mitigation phase compared to 206 during the control period. This represents a significant increase in the percentage of ED visits by high-risk patients for subsequent opioid OD during the COVID-19 mitigation phase (0.59% of ED visits vs. 0.46% of ED visits, p=0.018). Conclusion: The number of patients presenting to the ED at high risk for subsequent opioid OD was not affected by the COVID-19 mitigation measures, resulting in a relative increase in the percentage of high-risk patients seen during that time. Future determination of the effect of surge mitigation strategies on linkage to care and treatment resources available during that time will be important to develop strategies to ensure appropriate resources are in place for these high-risk patients for future pandemic preparedness.

14.
Heart ; 107(SUPPL 1):A75, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1325138

ABSTRACT

Introduction In an effort to reduce non-essential face to face contact during the COVD pandemic our pacemaker service was restructured in March 2020 to home monitoring only. Home monitors were issued at implant and wound reviews were done remotely via photo messages at one month or if prompted by the patient. Existing patients were given monitors on an ad hoc basis. A dedicated physiologist worked off site on home monitoring clinics. We assess the impact on our service and on patient experience of these changes one year after implementation. Methods Baseline characteristics of age at implant and distance of home address from hospital were collected from all patients undergoing pacemaker home monitoring. Patients were surveyed using an adapted version of the Generic Short Patient Experiences Questionnaire (GS-PEQ). Comparison was made with our standard face-to-face follow-up model (1, 3, and 12 months). Results Data was collected for 326 patients. 233 received a new permanent pacemaker from March 2020 onwards and 93 existing patients were issued with a home monitor. Average age at pacemaker implant was 80.6 year (± 9.9 years). The average one-way distance from home to outpatient clinic saved was 15.1 miles (±10.4). 567 face-to-face appointments were saved. In an average day the off-site physiologist reviewed over 100 patient records, contacted 10 patients by phone and dictated reports on 20 patients (14 clinic patients and 6 home monitor alerts).Of patients surveyed 88% agreed with the statement 'I feel safe being cared for solely with a remote monitoring service', 84% agreed with the statement 'I receive the same standard of care via remote monitoring and face-toface appointments'. Time saved by avoiding a face to face appointment was more than 1 hour for 90% of respondents. Those surveyed requested communication of reassuring monitoring, the ability to contact the pacing team in the event of concerns and clearer instructions for the home monitoring device. Only 34% of newly implanted patients were able to send a photo message of their wound at one month without prompting or assistance. We did not get a post procedure photo in 38% and the rest either spoke to us about the wound or had a face-to face visit. There was a significant difference in mean age between those who sent a photo (73.72) and those who didn't (81.38) (P = 0.000607). Conclusion Rapid role out of a remote monitoring service for permanent pacemakers across Somerset was feasible, produced significant savings in clinics and was well received by patients. There were significant time savings for physiologists and patients. However remote wound monitoring in elderly patients was problematic due to the difficulty sending photo messages.

15.
Diabetic Medicine ; 38(SUPPL 1):57, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1238421

ABSTRACT

Background and Aims: My Diabetes My Way (MDMW) is NHS Scotland's interactive website, structured eLearning service and mobile app supporting education and diabetes self-management. covid-19 specific advice was added in March 2020. We analysed use throughout 2020, relating user activity to stages of the pandemic. Methods: Data were collected using registration and audit logs observing user activity across all website content and features accessed. Results: Monthly page accesses for the public website increased to an average of 91,442 from 73,583 in 2019. Significant activity increases were observed in March n = 101,326 when lockdown commenced. Peak months include July (n = 108,811) when restrictions were relaxing, and September (n = 118,698) and October (n = 109,064) when virus rates increased again. The top five pages accessed in 2020 were;Coronavirus: advice for people living with diabetes (n = 66,807), Blood glucose monitoring (n = 22,620), Sick day guidance for type 2 diabetes (n = 13,938), Alcohol (n = 13,168) and Charcot foot (n = 12,940). eLearning: In 2020, 775 individuals (65% of registrants) completed a Massive Open Online Course in diabetes self-management education. 257 individuals completed one of 8 QISMET-accredited structured eLearning courses. eLearning course usage increased in relation to patient awareness activity. Social Media: There are currently 3,096 Facebook and 1,858 Twitter followers. Records Access: 55,605 patients had registered to access their data and 29,752 had actively accessed their records by end 2020. Patient feedback remains highly positive. Conclusion: My Diabetes My Way is a consistent and reliable resource for people with diabetes and their families to access at any time online, particularly relevant during the pandemic.

16.
Diabetic Medicine ; 38(SUPPL 1):65, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1238410

ABSTRACT

Aims: Self-management education is an essential component of type 1 diabetes care which improves health outcomes. Online mediums of education delivery are growing in popularity, offering a flexible alternative to traditional group education. Interest in online education has increased as healthcare restructuring secondary to covid-19 has restricted face-to- face offerings. We delivered and evaluated a free open online course in type 1 diabetes self-management education. Methods: Understanding type 1 diabetes was a free open online course accessible via registration on an online platform. The course was delivered over a 2-day period in December 2020 and focused on key self-management concepts featuring videos, quizzes and moderated comment sections accompanied by a daily live Q&A session. The course was evaluated via a post-course questionnaire to establish user feedback and experience. Results: 216 users started the course, with 106 users completing >75% of the course steps (completion rate 49.1%). Among the 103 users who completed the optional post-course questionnaire, 69 had type 1 diabetes and 21 were healthcare professionals. Most users agreed that the course was easy to follow (95.1%), improved their knowledge of diabetes (76.2%), motivated them to manage their diabetes (79.7%) and improved their self-management confidence (79.4%). Thematic analysis of free-text responses identified appreciation of the peer-learning environment provided with minimal technical difficulties experienced. Conclusions: Open online courses offer a remotely accessible, engaging and scalable method of self-management education delivery that motivated and improved the self-management confidence of their user base.

17.
BMJ Innovations ; 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-947824

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Type 2 diabetes self-management education is an essential component of type 2 diabetes care that is traditionally delivered in a face-to-face setting. In response to the recent COVID-19 pandemic, innovative solutions are urgently needed, allowing provision of self-management education that can be delivered in compliance with social distancing policies. Innovations that are self-service and can deliver education efficiently at low cost are particularly appealing to healthcare providers and commissioners. Methods: We aimed to evaluate user uptake, dropout, acceptability, satisfaction, perceived short-term knowledge gain and health benefits/behaviour changes in relation to a free massive open online course (MOOC) in diabetes self-management education, created and delivered during the COVID-19 pandemic. This course, focusing on addressing knowledge and self-management needs for people with type 2 diabetes, made use of online interactive content including expert and patient videos, quizzes, moderated discussion boards and live social media that encouraged personal reflection and goal setting. User expectations and experiences were explored via survey-based methods. Here, we present our experience of developing the course and describe users' experiences. Results: 1991 users registered interest in the course over a 2-week period, with 976 users starting the course and 640 (65.6%) users completing the course in full. Users engaged well, finding the course educational, user-friendly and motivating, demonstrating high completion rates and user satisfaction. A statistically significant (p<0.001) increase in self-reported self-management ability and health knowledge was observed among participants with type 2 diabetes. Discussion: MOOCs in type 2 diabetes self-management education have great potential for delivering education efficiently at scale and low cost. Although engagement can be limited by digital literacy, benefits include flexible and remote access to up-to-date, evidence-based education delivered by a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals. © 2020 Author(s) (or their employer(s)).

18.
J Taiwan Inst Chem Eng ; 116: 67-80, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947303

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus, promoter of COVID-19, already infected millions of people around the world, resulting in thousands of fatal victims. Facing this unprecedented crisis in human history, several research groups, industrial companies and governments have been spending efforts to develop vaccines and medications. People from distinct knowledge fields are doing their part in order to overcome this crisis. Chemical Engineers are also contributing in the development of actions to control the SARS-CoV-2 virus. However, many chemical engineers still do not know how to use the knowledge acquired from Chemical Engineering school to collaborate in the fight against the COVID-19. In this context, the present paper aims to discuss several knowledge fields within the Chemical Engineering and correlated areas successfully applied to create innovative and effective solutions in the fight against the COVID-19.

19.
Risk Management and Insurance Review ; 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-832977

ABSTRACT

A year from the inauguration, four of the top five Democratic 2020 U.S. Presidential election candidates in the polls are in their seventies. Using actuarial data and the history of Presidential assassinations, the top two contenders, Former Vice President Joe Biden and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, have a 24–29% chance of not surviving to the end of a hypothetical first term. The 77 and 78-year-old men's chances of dying before the end of a second term as President of the United States are between 46 and 56%. © 2020 The American Risk and Insurance Association

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