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1.
Neuroepidemiology ; 56(3): 147-150, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2194286

Subject(s)
Forecasting , Humans
2.
J Neural Transm (Vienna) ; 129(11): 1377-1385, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2059861

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of Parkinson's disease (PD) is rising, rendering it one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. Treatment and monitoring of patients require regular specialized in- and outpatient care. Patients with PD are more likely to have a complicated disease course if they become infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Regular in-hospital appointments place these patients at risk of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 due to travel and contact with other patients and staff. However, guidelines for the management of outpatients with PD during times of increased risk of infection are currently lacking. These are urgently needed to conduct risk-benefit evaluations to recommend the best medical treatment. This article discusses best practice approaches based on the current literature, as suggested by the multidisciplinary Network of University Medicine (NUM) in Germany. These include measures such as mask-wearing, hand hygiene, social distancing measures, and appropriate testing strategies in outpatient settings, which can minimize the risk of exposure. Furthermore, the urgency of appointments should be considered. Visits of low urgency may be conducted by general practitioners or via telemedicine consultations, whereas in-person presentation is required in case of moderate and high urgency visits. Classification of urgency should be carried out by skilled medical staff, and telemedicine (telephone or video consultations) may be a useful tool in this situation. The currently approved vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 are safe and effective for patients with PD and play a key role in minimizing infection risk for patients with PD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Outpatients , Pandemics/prevention & control , Parkinson Disease/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci ; : appineuropsych22010002, 2022 Jul 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962561

ABSTRACT

Encephalopathy, a common condition among patients hospitalized with COVID-19, can be a challenge to manage and negatively affect prognosis. While encephalopathy may present clinically as delirium, subsyndromal delirium, or coma and may be a result of systemic causes such as hypoxia, COVID-19 has also been associated with more prolonged encephalopathy due to less common but nevertheless severe complications, such as inflammation of the brain parenchyma (with or without cerebrovascular involvement), demyelination, or seizures, which may be disproportionate to COVID-19 severity and require specific management. Given the large number of patients hospitalized with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 infection, even these relatively unlikely complications are increasingly recognized and are particularly important because they require specific management. Therefore, the aim of this review is to provide pragmatic guidance on the management of COVID-19 encephalopathy through consensus agreement of the Global COVID-19 Neuro Research Coalition. A systematic literature search of MEDLINE, medRxiv, and bioRxiv was conducted between January 1, 2020, and June 21, 2021, with additional review of references cited within the identified bibliographies. A modified Delphi approach was then undertaken to develop recommendations, along with a parallel approach to score the strength of both the recommendations and the supporting evidence. This review presents analysis of contemporaneous evidence for the definition, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of COVID-19 encephalopathy and practical guidance for clinical assessment, investigation, and both acute and long-term management.

4.
Cephalalgia ; 42(11-12): 1207-1217, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832990

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Delayed-onset of headache seems a specific feature of cerebrovascular events after COVID-19 vaccines. METHODS: All consecutive events reported to the United States Vaccine Adverse Reporting System following COVID-19 vaccines (1 January to 24 June 2021), were assessed. The timing of headache onset post-vaccination in subjects with and without concomitant cerebrovascular events, including cerebral venous thrombosis, ischemic stroke, and intracranial haemorrhage was analysed. The diagnostic accuracy in predicting concurrent cerebrovascular events of the guideline- proposed threshold of three-days from vaccination to headache onset was evaluated. RESULTS: There were 314,610 events following 306,907,697 COVID-19 vaccine doses, including 41,700 headaches, and 178/41,700 (0.4%) cerebrovascular events. The median time between the vaccination and the headache onset was shorter in isolated headache (1 day vs. 4 (in cerebral venous thrombosis), 3 (in ischemic stroke), or 10 (in intracranial hemorrhage) days, all P < 0.001). Delayed onset of headache had an area under the curve of 0.83 (95% CI: 0.75-0.97) for cerebral venous thrombosis, 0.70 (95% CI: 0.63-76) for ischemic stroke and 0.76 (95% CI: 0.67-84) for intracranial hemorrhage, and >99% negative predictive value. CONCLUSION: Headache following COVID-19 vaccination occurs within 1 day and is rarely associated with cerebrovascular events. Delayed onset of headache 3 days post-vaccination was an accurate diagnostic biomarker for the occurrence of a concomitant cerebrovascular events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , Vaccines , Venous Thrombosis , Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems , Biomarkers , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Headache/chemically induced , Headache/etiology , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/chemically induced , United States , Vaccines/adverse effects
5.
Ann Neurol ; 2022 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1756553

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify the rates of neurological events following administration of mRNA (Pfizer, Moderna) or adenovirus vector (Janssen) vaccines in the U.S.. METHODS: We utilized publicly available data from the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) collected between January 1, 2021-June 14, 2021. All free text symptoms that were reported within 42 days of vaccine administration were manually reviewed and grouped into 36 individual neurological diagnostic categories. Post-vaccination neurological event rates were compared between vaccine types and to age-matched baseline incidence rates in the U.S. and rates of neurological events following COVID. RESULTS: Of 306,907,697 COVID vaccine doses administered during the study timeframe, 314,610 (0.1%) people reported any adverse event and 105,214 (0.03%) reported neurological adverse events in a median of 1 day (IQR0-3) from inoculation. Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS), and cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) occurred in fewer than 1 per 1,000,000 doses. Significantly more neurological adverse events were reported following Janssen (Ad26.COV2.S) vaccination compared to either Pfizer-BioNtech (BNT162b2) or Moderna (mRNA-1273; 0.15% versus 0.03% versus 0.03% of doses, respectively,P<0.0001). The observed-to-expected ratios for GBS, CVT and seizure following Janssen vaccination were ≥1.5-fold higher than background rates. However, the rate of neurological events after acute SARS-CoV-2 infection was up to 617-fold higher than after COVID vaccination. INTERPRETATION: Reports of serious neurological events following COVID vaccination are rare. GBS, CVT and seizure may occur at higher than background rates following Janssen vaccination. Despite this, rates of neurological complications following acute SARS-CoV-2 infection are up to 617-fold higher than after COVID vaccination. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

6.
Lancet ; 396(10266): 1882-1883, 2020 12 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591210
7.
Neuroepidemiology ; 55(6): 425-426, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463076
8.
J Neurol Sci ; 427: 117532, 2021 08 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253235

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccine induced immune mediated thrombocytopenia or VITT, is a recent and rare phenomenon of thrombosis with thrombocytopenia, frequently including cerebral venous thromboses (CVT), that has been described following vaccination with adenovirus vaccines ChAdOx1 nCOV-19 (AstraZeneca) and Ad26.COV2·S Johnson and Johnson (Janssen/J&J). The evaluation and management of suspected cases of CVT post COVID-19 vaccination are critical skills for a broad range of healthcare providers. METHODS: A collaborative comprehensive review of literature was conducted among a global group of expert neurologists and hematologists. FINDINGS: Strategies for rapid evaluation and treatment of the CVT in the context of possible VITT exist, including inflammatory marker measurements, PF4 assays, and non-heparin anticoagulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thrombosis , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects , Venous Thrombosis/therapy
9.
Ann Neurol ; 2021 Apr 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1173774

ABSTRACT

There is an accumulating volume of research into neurological manifestations of COVID-19. However, inconsistent study designs, inadequate controls, poorly-validated tests, and differing settings, interventions, and cultural norms weaken study quality, comparability, and thus the understanding of the spectrum, burden and pathophysiology of these complications. Therefore, a global COVID-19 Neuro Research Coalition, together with the WHO, has reviewed reports of COVID-19 neurological complications and harmonised clinical measures for future research. This will facilitate well-designed studies using precise, consistent case definitions of SARS-CoV2 infection and neurological complications, with standardised forms for pooled data analyses that non-specialists can use, including in low-income settings. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

10.
Sci Total Environ ; 764: 142919, 2021 Apr 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065580

ABSTRACT

For over 15-years, proponents of the One Health approach have worked to consistently interweave components that should never have been separated and now more than ever need to be re-connected: the health of humans, non-human animals, and ecosystems. We have failed to heed the warning signs. A One Health approach is paramount in directing our future health in this acutely and irrevocably changed world. COVID-19 has shown us the exorbitant cost of inaction. The time to act is now.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , One Health , Animals , Berlin , Ecosystem , Global Health , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
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