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1.
Cell ; 185(6): 1025-1040.e14, 2022 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649487

ABSTRACT

During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, novel and traditional vaccine strategies have been deployed globally. We investigated whether antibodies stimulated by mRNA vaccination (BNT162b2), including third-dose boosting, differ from those generated by infection or adenoviral (ChAdOx1-S and Gam-COVID-Vac) or inactivated viral (BBIBP-CorV) vaccines. We analyzed human lymph nodes after infection or mRNA vaccination for correlates of serological differences. Antibody breadth against viral variants is lower after infection compared with all vaccines evaluated but improves over several months. Viral variant infection elicits variant-specific antibodies, but prior mRNA vaccination imprints serological responses toward Wuhan-Hu-1 rather than variant antigens. In contrast to disrupted germinal centers (GCs) in lymph nodes during infection, mRNA vaccination stimulates robust GCs containing vaccine mRNA and spike antigen up to 8 weeks postvaccination in some cases. SARS-CoV-2 antibody specificity, breadth, and maturation are affected by imprinting from exposure history and distinct histological and antigenic contexts in infection compared with vaccination.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19 , Germinal Center , Antigens, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Vaccination
2.
Cell Host Microbe ; 29(12): 1738-1743.e4, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574127

ABSTRACT

Different SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are approved in various countries, but few direct comparisons of the antibody responses they stimulate have been reported. We collected plasma specimens in July 2021 from 196 Mongolian participants fully vaccinated with one of four COVID-19 vaccines: Pfizer/BioNTech, AstraZeneca, Sputnik V, and Sinopharm. Functional antibody testing with a panel of nine SARS-CoV-2 viral variant receptor binding domain (RBD) proteins revealed marked differences in vaccine responses, with low antibody levels and RBD-ACE2 blocking activity stimulated by the Sinopharm and Sputnik V vaccines in comparison to the AstraZeneca or Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines. The Alpha variant caused 97% of infections in Mongolia in June and early July 2021. Individuals who recover from SARS-CoV-2 infection after vaccination achieve high antibody titers in most cases. These data suggest that public health interventions such as vaccine boosting, potentially with more potent vaccine types, may be needed to control COVID-19 in Mongolia and worldwide.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Mass Vaccination , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adult , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Gene Expression , Humans , Immune Sera/chemistry , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Male , Middle Aged , Mongolia/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
3.
Front Immunol ; 12: 739037, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448729

ABSTRACT

Background: Transfusion of COVID-19 convalescent plasma (CCP) containing high titers of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies serves as therapy for COVID-19 patients. Transfusions early during disease course was found to be beneficial. Lessons from the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic could inform early responses to future pandemics and may continue to be relevant in lower resource settings. We sought to identify factors correlating to high antibody titers in convalescent plasma donors and understand the magnitude and pharmacokinetic time course of both transfused antibody titers and the endogenous antibody titers in transfused recipients. Methods: Plasma samples were collected up to 174 days after convalescence from 93 CCP donors with mild disease, and from 16 COVID-19 patients before and after transfusion. Using ELISA, anti-SARS-CoV-2 Spike RBD, S1, and N-protein antibodies, as well as capacity of antibodies to block ACE2 from binding to RBD was measured in an in vitro assay. As an estimate for viral load, viral RNA and N-protein plasma levels were assessed in COVID-19 patients. Results: Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels and RBD-ACE2 blocking capacity were highest within the first 60 days after symptom resolution and markedly decreased after 120 days. Highest antibody titers were found in CCP donors that experienced fever. Effect of transfused CCP was detectable in COVID-19 patients who received high-titer CCP and had not seroconverted at the time of transfusion. Decrease in viral RNA was seen in two of these patients. Conclusion: Our results suggest that high titer CCP should be collected within 60 days after recovery from donors with past fever. The much lower titers conferred by transfused antibodies compared to endogenous production in the patient underscore the importance of providing CCP prior to endogenous seroconversion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Convalescence , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Seroconversion , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antigens, Viral/blood , Blood Donors , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Kinetics , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients , RNA, Viral/blood
5.
EBioMedicine ; 67: 103355, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385438

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is increasing concern that persistent infection of SARS-CoV-2 within immunocompromised hosts could serve as a reservoir for mutation accumulation and subsequent emergence of novel strains with the potential to evade immune responses. METHODS: We describe three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who were persistently positive for SARS-CoV-2 by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Viral viability from longitudinally-collected specimens was assessed. Whole-genome sequencing and serological studies were performed to measure viral evolution and evidence of immune escape. FINDINGS: We found compelling evidence of ongoing replication and infectivity for up to 162 days from initial positive by subgenomic RNA, single-stranded RNA, and viral culture analysis. Our results reveal a broad spectrum of infectivity, host immune responses, and accumulation of mutations, some with the potential for immune escape. INTERPRETATION: Our results highlight the potential need to reassess infection control precautions in the management and care of immunocompromised patients. Routine surveillance of mutations and evaluation of their potential impact on viral transmission and immune escape should be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immune Evasion , Mutation , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Child, Preschool , Evolution, Molecular , Female , Genome, Viral , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Male , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Whole Genome Sequencing , Young Adult
6.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 145(10): 1221-1227, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261421

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT.­: The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has elicited a surge in demand for serologic testing to identify previously infected individuals. In particular, antibody testing is crucial in identifying COVID-19 convalescent plasma, which has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration under the Emergency Use Authorization for use as passive immunotherapy for hospitalized patients infected with COVID-19. Currently, high-titer COVID-19 convalescent plasma can be qualified by Ortho's Vitros COVID-19 IgG antibody test. OBJECTIVE.­: To explore the use of an efficient testing method to identify high-titer COVID-19 convalescent plasma for use in treating COVID-19-infected patients and track COVID-19 positivity over time. DESIGN.­: We evaluated an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based method that detects antibodies specific to the SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD) with individual and pooled plasma samples and compared its performance against the Vitros COVID-19 IgG antibody test. Using the pooled RBD-ELISA (P-RE) method, we also screened more than 10 000 longitudinal healthy blood donor samples to assess seroprevalence. RESULTS.­: P-RE demonstrates 100% sensitivity in detecting Food and Drug Administration-defined high-titer samples when compared with the Vitros COVID-19 IgG antibody test. Overall sensitivity of P-RE when compared with the Vitros COVID-19 IgG antibody test and our individual sample RBD-ELISA (I-RE) were 83% and 56%, respectively. When screening 10 218 healthy blood donor samples by P-RE, we found the seroprevalence correlated with the local infection rates with a correlation coefficient of 0.21 (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS.­: Pooling plasma samples can be used to efficiently screen large populations for individuals with high-titer anti-RBD antibodies, important for COVID-19 convalescent plasma identification.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Pandemics/prevention & control , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sensitivity and Specificity , Seroepidemiologic Studies
7.
Sci Immunol ; 5(54)2020 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963892

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies, particularly those preventing viral spike receptor binding domain (RBD) interaction with host angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor, can neutralize the virus. It is, however, unknown which features of the serological response may affect clinical outcomes of COVID-19 patients. We analyzed 983 longitudinal plasma samples from 79 hospitalized COVID-19 patients and 175 SARS-CoV-2-infected outpatients and asymptomatic individuals. Within this cohort, 25 patients died of their illness. Higher ratios of IgG antibodies targeting S1 or RBD domains of spike compared to nucleocapsid antigen were seen in outpatients who had mild illness versus severely ill patients. Plasma antibody increases correlated with decreases in viral RNAemia, but antibody responses in acute illness were insufficient to predict inpatient outcomes. Pseudovirus neutralization assays and a scalable ELISA measuring antibodies blocking RBD-ACE2 interaction were well correlated with patient IgG titers to RBD. Outpatient and asymptomatic individuals' SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, including IgG, progressively decreased during observation up to five months post-infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/blood , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/genetics , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/blood , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
8.
medRxiv ; 2020 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808855

ABSTRACT

Recovery from COVID-19 is associated with production of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, but it is uncertain whether these confer immunity. We describe viral RNA shedding duration in hospitalized patients and identify patients with recurrent shedding. We sequenced viruses from two distinct episodes of symptomatic COVID-19 separated by 144 days in a single patient, to conclusively describe reinfection with a new strain harboring the spike variant D614G. With antibody and B cell analytics, we show correlates of adaptive immunity, including a differential response to D614G. Finally, we discuss implications for vaccine programs and begin to define benchmarks for protection against reinfection from SARS-CoV-2.

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