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1.
Journal of the American College of Surgeons ; 235(5):S322-S322, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2107615
2.
12th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Participative Computing for Sustainable Futures, NordiCHI 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2088927

ABSTRACT

People with religious and/or spiritual interests have long been digitally connected and have engaged in joint prayer, worship, or meditation. However, the COVID pandemic has accelerated this trend as more religious and/or spiritual activities were technologically mediated. Many of these formats had to be implemented quickly, often with little participation from stakeholders. In this workshop, we aim to bring together scholars and practitioners from different backgrounds, such as religious studies, theology, HCI, and participatory design, to start a conversation about what collaborative technological design and research with religious and/or spiritual communities could look like in the future and what needs to be done to get to such futures. The outcomes of this workshop will be the formation of a transdisciplinary research and design community, the establishment of guiding principles and best practices that can inform research and design methodologies, and the dissemination of this knowledge in collaborative post-workshop publications. © 2022 Owner/Author.

3.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2047043

ABSTRACT

The Artful Craft of Science (TACoS) is a week-long summer camp that the University of Wyoming has provided annually for up to 80 upcoming 5th and 6th graders since 2015. The program includes a variety of activities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), including a five-day introductory computer science (CS) class. In 2020 and 2021, TACoS ran virtually due to COVID-19, revealing a unique opportunity to compare two instances of the CS section of the program. This study focuses on answering two questions: 1) How does video quality impact student participation and engagement;and 2) How does the length of time that content is accessible affect how students engage with course material? Both virtual years (Summers 2020 and 2021), the CS program included five 20-30-minute videos, a corresponding website for students to follow, and physical components that were mailed to each student prior to the course. After the first year (Summer 2020), improvements were made to the CS course presentation including attention to video quality, fresh course content for repeat-attendees, and further streamlined lesson plans. In the second virtual year (Summer 2021), students were given access to course material for a longer amount of time, as content remained available for a month instead of only during the camp week. Over both virtual years, viewership data was collected from each video including the number of views per activity, the average view duration, the audience retention rate across each video, the average views per viewer, and the lifetime watch time for each video. A total of 37 (46%) parent evaluation reviews (including perspectives of their students) of the TACoS program were collected, providing insight on the overall impressions of the camp, the CS program specifically, the students' favorite project/course within TACoS, the course completion rate, the ranked comparison of parents' time spent helping their child with each TACoS program, and general parent feedback. Findings show that there was improvement in the video content which could have invited more participation in the project/course and higher student engagement with the project/course material in the second virtual year. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022.

4.
International Journal of Educational Research ; 115, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2015396

ABSTRACT

Remote learning programs were rapidly implemented throughout the COVID-19 pandemic during school closures. We drew on an ongoing longitudinal study of a cohort of children in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana to survey children (N = 1,844), their caregivers, and teachers to examine learning experiences during the ten months of school closures in Ghana in 2020. We documented inequalities in remote learning opportunities offered by public and private schools, as well as who accessed remote learning and the quality of learning opportunities. In addition, controlling for pre-pandemic learning outcomes, we documented learning gaps, with food insecure, low socioeconomic status, and public-school children performing significantly worse than their peers (0.2–0.3 SD gap). Results highlight pandemic-related inequalities in a cohort of Ghanaian primary schoolchildren. © 2022

5.
Pediatrics ; 149, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003047

ABSTRACT

Background: The use of cloth and surgical face masks has been shown to decrease the rate of COVID-19 transmission. As COVID19 cases increased in the United States, many youth sports organizations implemented masking requirements with the goal of limiting the spread of the virus. However, the use of masks during athletic activity remains controversial. We surveyed young athletes between the ages of 12 and 18 in order to understand their attitudes towards mask wear during youth sports and to determine patterns of mask wear and sports participation during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We recruited participants from pediatric outpatient sports medicine clinics and invited them to complete an online survey administered via REDCap. The survey included 9 items that used a Likert-type scale to determine agreement with statements about masking during sports. An additional 5 multiple choice items asked about sports participation and assessed patterns of mask use during athletics. Results: We collected 82 responses between February and June of 2021. All athletes reported that masks were required for some part of their sports participation. The majority of respondents (59%) reported that masks were mandatory for all sports activities, while 15% reported compulsory mask use only when athletes were close to each other. An additional 19% of athletes were required to wear masks when congregating but not exercising (e.g. on the sidelines or in the locker rooms). Most athletes (51%) strongly or somewhat agreed that mask use during sports would make other athletes or coaches less likely to get infected with COVID. However, only 36% of respondents agreed that masks offered self-protection against infection. Thirty-eight percent of athletes somewhat or strongly agreed that masks are comfortable to wear during sports, while 48% disagreed. Forty-four percent of participants felt that mask use interfered with their sports performance. Thirty-four percent of respondents agreed with the statement that mask use during sports is dangerous with 43% in disagreement. When asked to rate concurrence with the statement “I am willing to wear a mask if it allows me to participate in sports and physical activities”, 62% of participants somewhat or strongly agreed while 30% disagreed. Forty-four percent of young athletes reported their sports participation time decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic, while 28% reported increased participation. Conclusion: Mask use is an important strategy in preventing the spread of COVID-19. Most young athletes recognize that mask use reduces transmission of infection to others. The majority of participants were willing to comply with mask requirements in order to be allowed to participate in sports. Survey responses indicate that many adolescents have concerns about how masks influence sports safety and performance. For most statements about masking, there was not a strong consensus among young athletes.

6.
The Emerald Handbook of Group and Team Communication Research ; : 443-460, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1891260

ABSTRACT

Juries are a decision making peer group composed of citizens who did not volunteer for the task, who do not know one another, and who are not connected to the people and events in the trial on which they will render a verdict. This chapter illuminates the communication events during deliberations, from selecting a foreperson, deciding when and how to vote, participation and turn-taking, the emergence of conflict, and rule-breaking. Deadlock juries, storytelling jurors, and juror misconduct are described during the group’s task. Sources for scholars to gain access to jury data, partner with organizations in the judicial system, and available recent recordings of jury deliberations are shared. Knowledge gaps are pointed out in understanding how group verdicts emerge from the unregulated talk of jurors, as well as new challenges for the judicial system as the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic suddenly rendered jury service an unhealthy task for citizens. © 2022 by Emerald Publishing Limited.

7.
2022 zh Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, zh EA 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1846575

ABSTRACT

Since the COVID-19 pandemics, we have witnessed an increase in online worship services. Nevertheless, HCI has little insight into how technological mediation influences religious experiences and how technology should be designed for use in religious contexts. Therefore, we see a unique opportunity to understand better real-world experiences of technology use in religious rituals and, more specifically, in online worship services. Inspired by contextual design, We virtually observed and interviewed eight persons during and after participation in online worship services. We identified a field of tension between faith, everyday life, individuality, and community. The data suggests that current online worship service systems do not account for believers' needs for community, faith, or extraordinariness. We discuss opportunities for future research and design, and aim to contribute to the understanding of online worship service experiences and the design of technology-mediated religious experiences. © 2022 ACM.

8.
Genetics in Medicine ; 24(3):S150, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1768091

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The global pandemic required healthcare institutions and clinical research programs to adapt quickly to non-traditional care models. TeleKidSeq is a pilot study that emerged from the NYCKidSeq program, an NIH-funded Clinical Sequencing Evidence-Generating (CSER) Consortium site focused on incorporating genomic medicine into the care of diverse New York City children with suspected genetic disorders. Embracing the opportunity to study the use of telehealth in delivering genomic results, TeleKidSeq will examine the impact of innovative remote genetic counseling modalities in medically underserved populations. Studies focusing on the use of telehealth performed before the COVID-19 pandemic have shown that patients prefer in-person visits to virtual visits;however, with the increased familiarity and widespread use of virtual platforms, we anticipate an increase in the preference for telehealth visits. TeleKidSeq aims to fill the gaps in current knowledge on the impact of visual aids in telehealth in diverse urban patient populations. Methods: TeleKidSeq will recruit 496 pediatric participants (aged 0-21 years) with neurologic, immunologic, or cardiac conditions suspected to have an underlying genetic cause who receive care predominantly within two large health systems in the New York metropolitan area. The Mount Sinai Genomics Stakeholder Board, consisting of diverse stakeholders and key community advisors, provided guidance about our study design and materials. Participants will be English- or Spanish-speaking, and based on prior enrollment data from NYCKidSeq study, we expect more than 65% will be from populations underrepresented in medical research. Prior to enrollment, participants will be randomized to receive their genomic results from a genetic counselor via telehealth either with screen sharing (ScrS) or without screen sharing (NScrS). All participants will receive genome sequencing (GS) from a clinically validated laboratory. Additionally, we will use GUÍA, a web-based application designed to enhance the delivery of genomic test results, in both the ScrC and NScrS arms to facilitate delivery of individualized genomic results and clinical information in a personalized, highly visual, and narrative manner. Surveys administered at baseline, after results disclosure, and 6-months post-results disclosure will be used to evaluate study outcomes. The primary outcome of the TeleKidSeq study will be participants’ perceived understanding of their GS results with a comparison between the results disclosed via videoconferencing with ScrS and NScrS arms. Secondary outcomes will include: objective understanding of GS results;understanding of medical follow-up recommendations and the actionability of genome sequencing results;adherence to medical follow-up recommendations made based on genomic results;and satisfaction with and ease of use of the telehealth experience, compared across the two arms. Diagnostic yield, clinical utility and cost of GS will also be assessed. Results: Not applicable. Conclusion: Overall, the TeleKidSeq pilot study will contribute to innovations in communicating genomic test results to diverse populations through telehealth technology. In conjunction with NYCKidSeq, this work will inform best practices for the implementation of genomic medicine in diverse, English- and Spanish-speaking populations.

9.
Anesthesia and Analgesia ; 132(5S_SUPPL):355-356, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1695950
10.
International HTA Db; 2021.
Non-conventional in English | International HTA Db | ID: grc-751179

ABSTRACT

Objectives:Due to the expected growing number of cases and the associated increasing average sick leave durations, long COVID not only places a burden on the patients and their families but also the wider economy, in particular, the workforce. The present systematic review aimed to support preparations and adjustments in the long COVID care planning in Austria by giving (1) an overview of recommendations about long COVID care pathways for adult patients as well as (2) examples of already existing care structures in selected European countries. Conclusions:In the included literature, it was recommended that the majority of long COVID-related healthcare should take place in primary care. There are however some differences in the served patient groups between countries. While, for example, in Austria and Germany, all long COVID patients -including former hospitalised and non-hospitalised COVID-19 patients- are advised to consult the general practitioner for a first clinical assessment, in the United Kingdom former hospitalised COVID-19 patients, who suffer from ongoing or new symptoms after 12 weeks of discharge, can attend primary care facilities or secondary care outpatient departments. After the first assessments, patients with more complex symptoms are advised to be referred to so-called specialised long COVID outpatient assessment clinics for further assessments. Some clinics are also intended to offer treatments, such as rehabilitative elements, themselves. Patients with one dominant symptom are recommended to be referred to secondary assessment by the respective specialist. Further options include rehabilitation, community health services and non-medical healthcare providers and are chosen depending on the patients' needs. Furthermore, self-management, such as exercising at home or stress reduction, is recommended as a single therapy for milder long COVID symptoms or as a supporting therapy in addition to other treatments for moderate to severe symptoms. In the United Kingdom, doctors can also refer the patients to a supported self-management online programme "The Your COVID Recovery Platform". Concerning additional (social) services, the same services as for other (chronic) diseases are also recommended for long COVID patients including support for employees, such as sick leave, phased return or transitional allowance. Recommendations:Overall, multidisciplinarity, a personalised approach and shared decision-making have been named as key factors for successful long COVID care. For that matter, good communication between healthcare professionals and the patients, including inclusive communication (e.g. by offering translated materials) and the right balance in the detail of provided information to avoid unnecessary uncertainty, is crucial. Methods:A systematic search in four databases and further unsystematic hand searches were conducted. Based on the predefined inclusion criteria, in total 14 references including five guidelines, four reviews, one consensus paper and four clinical perspectives were included for answering both research questions. To answer the second research question, an additional 23 references from further hand searches and expert consultations were considered including websites about patient organisations, healthcare facilities, social care services and a newspaper article about relevant healthcare facilities.

11.
International HTA Db; 2021.
Non-conventional in German | International HTA Db | ID: grc-751178

ABSTRACT

Objectives:Due to the expected increase in long COVID cases, social consequences have to be considered in addition to the impairments in daily life for the affected persons and their families. The aim of the cooperation with the Belgian HTA institute, KCE, was to provide an overview of long COVID prevalences and possible risk factors, as well as of the consequences for everyday life. Conclusions:Currently available data on the epidemiology of long COVID revealed that 5-36% of non-hospitalised COVID-19 patients and 39-72% of hospitalised patients reported long-lasting or recurrent symptoms one to three months after the acute infection. After three to six months, there was a slight decrease in prevalences in both patient populations (2-21% and 51-68%, respectively). After more than six months, 13-25% and up to 60% of the non-hospitalised and hospitalised patients respectively, still reported persistent symptoms. The most commonly reported symptoms among long COVID patients were fatigue (16-98%), shortness of breath (10-93%) and headache (9-91%) one to three months after acute infection, and fatigue (16-78%), cognitive impairment (13-55%) and respiratory problems (16-21%) after three to six months. Furthermore, the studies suggested that the female gender and a high number of symptoms during the acute infection may favour the occurrence of long COVID symptoms. In addition, some long COVID patients experienced impairments in activities of daily living and reduced social participation (e.g. inability to work). Recommendations:Until today, it remains unclear to what extent the reported long COVID symptoms can be distinguished from similar symptoms of other diseases and to what extent they are novel long-term symptoms (type and duration) compared with the long-term consequences of other severe infectious diseases. For this reason, sufficiently large, prospective, and, if possible, comparative cohort studies are recommended for future research initiatives. In addition, transparent communication of long COVID prevalences, including any potential uncertainties in the data, will be important in the future. Methods:A systematic search of 11 databases and a hand search were performed. Considering the predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria, 28 studies in 29 publications were included, comprising 22 cohort studies and six cross-sectional surveys.

12.
International HTA Db; 2020.
Non-conventional in English | International HTA Db | ID: grc-751177

ABSTRACT

Objectives:In March 30th 2020, a request was raised by the Austrian Ministry of Health (BMASGK) and further Austrian policy stakeholder to set up a Horizon Scanning System (HSS) for medicines and vaccines. The establishment of a HSS/ Horizon Scanning System for Covid-19 interventions has the intention of a. informing health policy makers at an early stage which interventions (vaccinations and drugs) are currently undergoing clinical trials and b. monitoring them over the next few months in order to support evidence-based purchasing, if necessary. Methods:To respond to the request by BMASGK, 1. As a first step an inventory, based on international sources, is being built. 2. As a second step, selective searches by means of searches in study registries are carried out for information on clinical studies in humans and the state of research. 3. The information gathered in the first two steps forms the basis for "vignettes" (short descriptions) for those products that are already at an "advanced" stage. 4. Subsequently, the products are being monitored with regard to their status of clinical studies up to approval and are finally evaluated for their benefit and harm. All work steps are conducted in close international (European) cooperation.

13.
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol ; 322(2): H319-H327, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613119

ABSTRACT

Vascular dysfunction has been reported in adults who have recovered from COVID-19. To date, no studies have investigated the underlying mechanisms of persistent COVID-19-associated vascular dysfunction. Our purpose was to quantify nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation in healthy adults who have recovered from SARS-CoV-2 infection. We hypothesized that COVID-19-recovered adults would have impaired NO-mediated vasodilation compared with adults who have not had COVID-19. In methods, we performed a cross-sectional study including 10 (5 men/5 women, 24 ± 4 yr) healthy control (HC) adults who were unvaccinated for COVID-19, 11 (4 men/7 women, 25 ± 6 yr) healthy vaccinated (HV) adults, and 12 (5 men/7 women, 22 ± 3 yr) post-COVID-19 (PC, 19 ± 14 wk) adults. COVID-19 symptoms severity (survey) was assessed. A standardized 39°C local heating protocol was used to assess NO-dependent vasodilation via perfusion (intradermal microdialysis) of 15 mM NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester during the plateau of the heating response. Red blood cell flux was measured (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC = flux/mmHg) was expressed as a percentage of maximum (28 mM sodium nitroprusside + 43°C). In results, the local heating plateau (HC: 61 ± 20%, HV: 60 ± 19%, PC: 67 ± 19%, P = 0.80) and NO-dependent vasodilation (HC: 77 ± 9%, HV: 71 ± 7%, PC: 70 ± 10%, P = 0.36) were not different among groups. Neither symptom severity (25 ± 12 AU) nor time since diagnosis correlated with the NO-dependent vasodilation (r = 0.46, P = 0.13; r = 0.41, P = 0.19, respectively). In conclusion, healthy adults who have had mild-to-moderate COVID-19 do not have altered NO-mediated cutaneous microvascular function.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Healthy young adults who have had mild-to-moderate COVID-19 do not display alterations in nitric oxide-mediated cutaneous microvascular function. In addition, healthy young adults who have COVID-19 antibodies from the COVID-19 vaccinations do not display alterations in nitric oxide-mediated cutaneous microvascular function.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Microcirculation/physiology , Skin/blood supply , Vasodilation/physiology , Adult , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Case-Control Studies , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Female , Humans , Laser-Doppler Flowmetry , Male , Microcirculation/drug effects , NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester/pharmacology , Nitric Oxide/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Vasodilation/drug effects , Young Adult
14.
Journal of Pediatric Neurology ; : 5, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1559232

ABSTRACT

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder affecting many organ systems. Patients commonly develop a variety of benign tumors as well as neurological disease, including seizures, autism, and cognitive delay. We report here the case of an adolescent patient with TSC and a history of mild COVID-19 who presented with a 1-day history of altered mental status. The patient was found to have ischemic cerebral infarction of the right MCA and ACA territories. Initial angiography showed an occlusion of the right internal carotid artery without a demonstrable etiology, with follow-up echocardiography and angiography revealing a large aortic thrombus. The patient was not a candidate for thrombus removal due to her cerebral infarct and received medical anticoagulation. Thrombosis progressed to involve the left ICA, with left cerebral infarction and subsequent death. Aortic thrombus embolization as a cause of cerebrovascular accident (CVA) is a novel finding in the setting of TSC and should be considered for pediatric patients with CVA of unknown etiology. It is unclear whether this was related to the prior COVID-19 infection.

15.
International HTA Database; 2020.
Non-conventional in English | International HTA Database | ID: grc-750673

ABSTRACT

Objectives:In March 30th 2020, a request was raised by the Austrian Ministry of Health (BMASGK) and further Austrian policy stakeholder to set up a Horizon Scanning System (HSS) for medicines and vaccines. The establishment of a HSS/ Horizon Scanning System for Covid-19 interventions has the intention of a. informing health policy makers at an early stage which interventions (vaccinations and drugs) are currently undergoing clinical trials and b. monitoring them over the next few months in order to support evidence-based purchasing, if necessary. Methods:To respond to the request by BMASGK, 1. As a first step an inventory, based on international sources, is being built. 2. As a second step, selective searches by means of searches in study registries are carried out for information on clinical studies in humans and the state of research. 3. The information gathered in the first two steps forms the basis for "vignettes" (short descriptions) for those products that are already at an "advanced" stage. 4. Subsequently, the products are being monitored with regard to their status of clinical studies up to approval and are finally evaluated for their benefit and harm. All work steps are conducted in close international (European) cooperation.

16.
Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice ; 19(3):13, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1353250

ABSTRACT

Background: Interprofessional education (IPE) is a critical component of health professions education but planning and implementation are challenged by logistical, physical, personnel, and recently global pandemic COVID-19 barriers. Purpose: This report describes the development and design of the proposed Hybrid Interprofessional Education (HIPE) model, a blended learning IPE model developed to mitigate barriers using a flexible framework and online collaborative technologies to deliver experiences based on Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) core competencies. Operational principles, model design, an example of model implementation, and outcomes are reported. Method: Fifty-four student physical therapists and physician assistants attending remote campuses of the same university participated and completed an exit survey. Descriptive statistics were calculated for Likert scale and semantic differential scale survey items and thematic analysis was conducted for open question responses. Results: Analysis revealed students felt improved understanding of interprofessional practice, the other profession's role, teamwork, and communication. Responses supported online, asynchronous delivery and the web application used but not the synchronous activity portion. Three themes arose from comments: learning with and from, interactions, and activity design. Conclusion: The HIPE model was used to deliver IPE that supported perceptions of student learning in IPEC core competencies when physical proximity was not possible. Further iterative research and model refinement are needed. Future research should include investigation of student learning outcomes when using the HIPE model.

18.
International HTA Database; 2020.
Non-conventional in English | International HTA Database | ID: covidwho-662059

ABSTRACT

Objectives:In March 30th 2020, a request was raised by the Austrian Ministry of Health (BMASGK) and further Austrian policy stakeholder to set up a Horizon Scanning System (HSS) for medicines and vaccines. The establishment of a HSS/ Horizon Scanning System for Covid-19 interventions has the intention of a. informing health policy makers at an early stage which interventions (vaccinations and drugs) are currently undergoing clinical trials and b. monitoring them over the next few months in order to support evidence-based purchasing, if necessary. Methods:To respond to the request by BMASGK, 1. As a first step an inventory, based on international sources, is being built. 2. As a second step, selective searches by means of searches in study registries are carried out for information on clinical studies in humans and the state of research. 3. The information gathered in the first two steps forms the basis for "vignettes" (short descriptions) for those products that are already at an "advanced" stage. 4. Subsequently, the products are being monitored with regard to their status of clinical studies up to approval and are finally evaluated for their benefit and harm. All work steps are conducted in close international (European) cooperation.

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