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1.
Lancet Healthy Longevity ; 3(7):E491-E500, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2068447

ABSTRACT

Background Because evidence on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in older adults is scarce, we aimed to evaluate the incidence and risk of adverse events after CoronaVac (Sinovac Biotech) vaccination in adults aged 60 years or older. Methods In this modified self-controlled case series, we enrolled adults aged 60 years or older who had received at least one dose of CoronaVac in Hong Kong between Feb 23, 2021, and Jan 31, 2022. We extracted population-based, electronic health record data from the clinical management system of the Hospital Authority on adverse events of special interest (from Jan 1, 2005, to Feb 23, 2022) and patients' demographic information (from Jan 1, 2018, to Jan 31, 2022), previous diagnoses (from Jan 1, 2018, to Jan 31, 2022), medication history (from Jan 1, 2018, to Jan 31, 2022), and laboratory tests, including those for SARS-CoV-2 infection (from Jan 1, 2018, to Jan 31, 2022). Details of vaccination status were provided by the Department of Health of the Hong Kong Government and were linked to data from the Hospital Authority with identity card numbers or passport numbers. Our outcomes were the overall incidence of any adverse event of special interest and the incidence rates of 30 adverse events of special interest, as suggested by the WHO Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety, in the inpatient setting within 21 days (2 days for anaphylaxis) of either the first, second, or third CoronaVac dose compared with a baseline period. Individuals who had a history of a particular event between Jan 1, 2005, and Feb 23, 2021, were excluded from the corresponding analysis. We evaluated the risk of an adverse event of special interest using conditional Poisson regression, adjusting for seasonal effects. Findings Of 1 253 497 individuals who received at least one dose of CoronaVac during the study period, 622 317 (49.6%) were aged at least 60 years and were included in the analysis. Our analysis sample received 1 229 423 doses of CoronaVac and had a mean age of 70.40 years (SD 8.10). 293 086 (47.1%) of 622 317 participants were men and 329 231 (52.9%) were women. The incidence of individual adverse events of interest ranged from 0.00 per 100 000 people to 57.49 per 100 000 people (thromboembolism). The first and third doses of CoronaVac were not associated with a significant excess risk of an adverse event of special interest within 21 days (or 2 days for anaphylaxis) of vaccination. After the second dose, the only significantly increased risk was for anaphylaxis (adjusted incidence rate ratio 2.61, 95% CI 1.08-6.31;risk difference per 100 000 people 0.61, 95% CI 0.03-1.81). Interpretation Because older age is associated with poor outcomes after SARS-CoV-2 infection, the benefits of CoronaVac vaccination in older adults outweigh the risks in regions where COVID-19 is prevalent. Ongoing monitoring of vaccine safety is warranted. Copyright (C) 2022 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

2.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7):S-1082, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967407

ABSTRACT

Background: Real-world population-based safety data about the COVID-19 mRNA vaccine is lacking in patients with various immunocompromised conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Aim: To determine the incidence rates of unplanned IBD-related hospital admission and all-cause emergency attendance following BNT162B2 vaccination in IBD patients. Methods: Through the Government commissioned, territory-wide active COVID19 safety surveillance, we linked population-level vaccination records and health outcome data, between March 10 (1st day of vaccination program) and September 30, 2021, to assess the association between two-dose of BNT162b2 and unplanned IBD-related hospitalization and all-cause emergency attendance. We used inverse probability treatment weightingbased cohort study design to balance the baseline characteristics between vaccinated and unvaccinated IBD patients. Poisson regression model was fitted to estimate the adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) of unplanned IBD hospital admission and 28-day emergency room attendance following the vaccination, using the unvaccinated group as the reference. Results: Among more than 4.1 million citizens with successful vaccine and health record-linkage, we identified 941 IBD patients (age: 46.0 ± 15.0 years, male: 64.2%) who completed twodose of BNT162b2 and 1196 age-sex matched unvaccinated IBD patients as control (age: 49.3 ± 18.3 years, male: 58.9%). After inverse propensity weighting, all baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were well balanced (standard mean difference < 0.1;Table 1). During a median follow-up of 59-60 days (181.2 person-years for BNT162b2 group;253.6 person-years for the unvaccinated group), there was no significant difference in the risk of unplanned IBD-related hospital admission [3.31 versus 5.13 per 100 person-years, IRR: 0.75 (0.38, 1.47)] and 28-day all-cause emergency room attendance [39.1 vs 47.5 per 100 person-years, IRR: 1.08 (0.76-1.53)] between BNT162b2 recipients and unvaccinated individuals. Series of stratified analyses, including patients with Crohn’s disease (N= 378) or ulcerative colitis (N=553), who received immunosuppressants (N=454) or biologics (N= 192), all showed that receiving two-dose of BNT162b2 vaccine was not associated with a higher risk of unplanned IBD-admission and 28-day emergency attendance when compared to their counterparts without vaccination (Figure 1). Conclusion: Results from this populationbased study showed no increase in risk of unplanned IBD-related hospitalization and allcause emergency attendance following two-dose of BNT162b2 Covid-19 vaccination in patients with IBD. This observation potentially reassures the medium-term safety of mRNA vaccine in patients with IBD, although there is still possible self-selection bias in receiving the vaccine. (Table Presented) (Figure Presented)

3.
HONG KONG JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY ; 25(2):94-102, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1939425

ABSTRACT

Introduction: We aimed to analyse the effect of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination on F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) imaging findings in cancer patients. Methods: A total of 165 oncology patients who underwent FDG PET/CT between 1 May 2021 and 30 September 2021 after their first or second COVID-19 vaccination with were included in this retrospective study. The occurrence and pattern of FDG uptake at the injection site (usually deltoid), ipsilateral axillary and other regional lymph nodes, were measured. Results: Overall, the incidence of FDG-avid ipsilateral regional nodal uptake was 26.7% (44/165), with a median maximal standardised uptake value of 3.2 (range, 1.7-13.8). Vaccine-associated hypermetabolic lymphadenopathy (VAHL) was found in 11.4% (5/44) of the subjects beyond 6 weeks after vaccination. VAHL was more common in patients receiving BioNTech-Fosun mRNA vaccine (compared with patients receiving the Sinovac CoronaVac inactivated vaccine), and in women (p < 0.05). Conclusion: VAHL is common and can be observed beyond 6 weeks after vaccination. It was seen more frequently in women and in patients receiving the mRNA-based vaccine. Proper vaccination history documentation, locating the vaccination site contralateral to the primary cancer, and appropriate scheduling of FDG PET/CT are advisable for correct image interpretation.

4.
Journal of China Tourism Research ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1900970

ABSTRACT

The casino industry may have been stigmatized by its notorious image due to the negative consequences that gambling brings. Yet, they are at the forefront in combating the pandemic, taking a proactive stand to expedite corporate social responsibility (CSR) through a constellation of means in a timely manner. Moreover, the majority of research focuses on the long-term strategic CSR, leaving ad-hoc CSR initiatives that are responsive without previous planning underexplored. Proactive and prompt CSR efforts exerted by casino conglomerates hence offer researchers a case in better understanding this rarely researched area pertaining to just-in-time CSR amid a mega turbulence. Based on data collected from casino websites, social media, and other public media, we have organized their initiatives into themes germane to safeguarding their personnel and guests, giving encouragement to the society, contributing to financial charities as well as daily necessities and protective supplies, promoting safety and better quality of life during the pandemic, and more. These endeavors do make a real difference in saving lives as well as uniting the community to build up resilience to mitigate the aftermath of the crisis. These expedited CSR efforts render a new phenomenon that we refer as just-in-time CSR. © 2022 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

7.
Embase; 2022.
Preprint in English | EMBASE | ID: ppcovidwho-334030

ABSTRACT

We studied 2780 adults in Hong Kong who received CoronaVac inactivated virus vaccine (Sinovac) and BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine (“Comirnaty”, BioNTech/Fosun Pharma). We found stronger and more durable antibody responses to two doses of the mRNA vaccine, and slightly stronger initial antibody responses to each vaccine in younger adults and women.

9.
Journal of the Hong Kong College of Cardiology ; 28(2):103, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1743907

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Tele-cardiac rehabilitation has demonstrated safety and efficacy in several clinical studies. With the outbreak of COVID-19, the centered-based CR service was totally suspended. To facilitate patients to exercise at home while being monitored. A pilot home-based cardiac tele-rehabilitation program was developed with a structured protocol at Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) and rolled out from October 2020. Objectives: 1. To minimize the impact of suspension of in-hospital CR service due to outbreak of COVID-19. 2. To evaluate the effects and develop a home-based CR program for remote rehabilitation, based on advanced technological infrastructure and complementary clinical protocols. Methodology: Target patients: Low risk cardiac patients who fulfil the intake criteria, able and willing to use digital monitoring devices including blood pressure machine, smart watch and smart phone. Program design: The program will last for 12 weeks and consists of education, exercise training and relaxation training. Each consenting patient will be given a training kit containing a training log-book, informative educational leaflets and a set of QR codes to access our home-made education, exercise training & relaxation practice videos. Individual phone consultation by multidisciplinary will be scheduled once a week at the first five weeks. Patients can view the video at their own convenience, and then discuss or ask questions during phone follow-up. Individualized exercise will be prescribed according to patients' age, mobility and cardio fitness level. Patients can follow the designated video to do exercise at home. They will be instructed to measure and record their blood pressure, heart rate, and rate perceived exertion (RPE) before and after exercise. Physiotherapist will phone call patient to monitor and coach patients. Evaluation: All patients will undergo a detailed face-to-face assessment at baseline and at 12-week. They are including 6-minute walk test, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood test for lipid profile, etc. In addition, patients will also request to fill in a set of questionnaires to measure the physical activity level, functional performance and psychological fitness. Conclusion: It believes that tele-rehabilitation is a more cost-effective model compared to center-based CR. It enables a new direction for the CR program.

10.
Kidney international reports ; 7(2):S416-S417, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1695657
11.
Kidney International Reports ; 7(2):S416-S417, 2022.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1693528
12.
Journal of Travel & Tourism Marketing ; 38(9):917-934, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1621376

ABSTRACT

This study draws on life history theory to rationalize how tourism enterprises make decisions and evolve during the COVID-19 pandemic. Using a case study approach, the current work improvises the house of trade-off paradox as a visual metaphoric framework that integrates three major dyadic trade-off pairs along with four organizational resource configuration aspects. This inquiry further synthesizes the wheel of selection strategy to pinpoint a mechanism in which tourism agencies mutate to adapt to a new normal based on acute environmental shocks. We further provide practical implications for operators with valuable insights germane to post-pandemic recovery.

13.
Lancet Infectious Diseases ; 21(11):1492-1493, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1557953
14.
International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1475973

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study aims to move beyond the current understanding of corporate social responsibility (CSR) to propose the concept of just-in-time (JIT) CSR as a metaphor that reflects hospitality operators’ endeavors to expedite socially responsible measures to both internal and external organizational stakeholders during times when functional and emotional supports are urgently needed. Design/methodology/approach: This research used a qualitative approach in two studies. Study 1 engaged a media analysis to better grasp the knowledge of the research problem at hand. Study 2 involved interviews from stakeholders to assess their emotions and perceptions of meanings of major contents discerned from the first study. Findings: This research highlights a process in which operators’ CSR practices (e.g. for business practices, for organizational strategy and for stakeholder well-being) during the COVID-19 crisis are imbued with connotative meanings (e.g. place-as-safety, place-as-partnership and place-as-warmth) that ultimately give shape to three core outcomes (e.g. individual rejoinder, brand resonance and societal resilience). Research limitations/implications: While JIT CSR is not an antidote for all devastations caused by COVID-19, it is posited as a needed mechanism that operators could use to ameliorate the situation and to go beyond their own stake to bring a broader array of societal benefits to humanity. Originality/value: This research underscores how hospitality operators expedite crisis responses to the pandemic, and how their societal objectives transform the image of a place from a commercial venue into a place imbued with meaning associated with safety, partnership and warmth. © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited.

15.
PLoS ONE ; 16(2), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1410733

ABSTRACT

Background: A high proportion of COVID-19 patients were reported to have cardiac involvements. Data pertaining to cardiac sequalae is of urgent importance to define subsequent cardiac surveillance.

16.
International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1091161

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This paper aims to analyze how a real-time COVID-19 pandemic is impacting Macao’s hospitality industry, and illustrates why lessons from COVID-19 are an opportunity for further development for the city. Design/methodology/approach: This case study highlights local government and hospitality industry responses to a real-time crisis. Academic studies, media news and reports have been collected to illustrate why the Macao’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic could be taken as a city case study example. Previous crisis experience provided guidance to Macao’s success in this pandemic. Findings: Macao has succeeded in managing the adverse effects of COVID-19, illustrating the coexistence of challenges and opportunities from experiencing the epidemic. With no COVID-19 cases in the city, cross-border tourism with China resumed in September. Macao is undeniably over reliant on the gambling industry to provide tax income and employment, creating an unbalanced industrial structure. However, the Chinese and Macao Governments, the hospitality industry and other stakeholders, have presented high levels of engagement, unity and rational courses of action during the pandemic. This paper examines Macao’s two orientations – intra and post-coronavirus – which are shown to be instrumental in the city’s future tourism development. Practical implications: As the paper is Macao-specific, some generalization may not be applicable. The lessons and strategies proposed in the paper may only be theoretically and temporarily workable in this real-time situation. However, as COVID-19 will remain for some time globally, the efficacy of the findings justifies further ongoing analysis and application beyond Macao. Originality/value: The case offers a first-hand analysis on the governance of Macao to negate the impacts of COVID-19, enabling a comprehensive review on the practices and policies that were effective during the virus outbreak. There is reference for researchers and practitioners in the public policy domain, and particularly in the area of crisis management and destination resilience. The result is worthy of future exploration on how the mechanism of centralized government facilitates risk management, and the rebuilding of a tourism economy in a crisis context, comparing this to other national systems. © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited.

17.
Current Issues in Tourism ; 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-968551

ABSTRACT

This study explores airline corporations’ crisis communication by underscoring how they capitalized on public relation campaigns to fortify favourable corporate image by conveying positive message frames during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study employed corpus linguistics to assess the evolution of corporate communication with respect to pre/early-crisis and during-crisis stages, based on a large volume of corpus data retrieved from press releases from major aviation enterprises. Message frames changed from business-as-usual with emphasis on business success and optimistic future prospects in the pre/early-crisis phase to corporate image fortification with emphasis on organizational resilience, social responsibility, and empathy. This study introduces a framework of process response, which highlights a mechanism in which resource endowments of organizational capabilities shape the extent to which organizations react to major disturbances through the aforementioned impression management frames. Discussions along with means to reframe business models are presented to identify what airline corporations could do when facing severe adversity. This study contributes to the literature by statistically comparing lexical items from a large corpus of textual contents in different crisis stages to illustrate changes in management’s crisis response tactics and focus through an evolution of framing mechanism. © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

18.
Chest ; 158(4):A1280, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-871862

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: Medical Student/Resident Disorders of the Pleura Posters SESSION TYPE: Med Student/Res Case Rep Postr PRESENTED ON: October 18-21, 2020 INTRODUCTION: Hepatopulmonary fistulas are quite rare, a complication which can be due to primary etiologies such as hydatid or pyogenic cysts (1). These insults cause transdiaphragmatic infiltration leading to rupture at the lower lung leading to the formation of a fistula. Secondary causes are congenital abnormalities, surgical or penetrating trauma. Our patient developed an extremely rare complication of fistulization with the right lung pleura due to a suppurative hepatic collection leading to a complicated clinical presentation. There are known septic embolic or constitutional symptoms associated with the diagnosis which were not present in our case, rather acute hypoxic respiratory failure and septic shock due to rupture of the hepatic abscess. CASE PRESENTATION: A 59-year-old female with a recent history of a benign liver tumor presented for shortness of breath and dry cough for two days. On physical exam, she was tachypneic and increased work of breathing. Vital signs were significant for oxygen desaturation to 86% on room air, required mechanical ventilation. She was admitted to the intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure due to possible multifocal pneumonia and rule out COVID-19 Upon admission evaluation, laboratory results significant for transaminitis (Alk Phos 353, AST 197 and ALT 60) Chest X-ray (Figure 1) raised right hemidiaphragm, right lower lobe atelectasis and bilateral alveolar infiltrates. CT AP with IV contrast revealed a large right sub diaphragmatic abscess with a right-sided empyema (Figure 2) Upon review of daily CXR, day 6 of the admission, new loculated pneumothoraces in the upper and middle right lung. Chest tube was placed for the pnuemothoraces. The pleural fluid was exudative and neutrophil predominant. Followed by an IR drainage of the liver abscess yielding 60 cc of brown purulent fluid. The spontaneous pneumothorax was likely in the setting of a cystopleural fistula resulting from ruptured hepatic abscess given similar microbiology with anaerobic gram positive rod growth from the IR guided liver abscess drainage and the chest tube drainage. DISCUSSION: Hepatopulmonary fistulas may have benign courses but there is a significant mortality rate due to septic shock and florid infection. A pyogenic abscess causes obstruction of the biliary tree allowing for bacterial overgrowth complicated by rupture leading to peritonitis or sepsis. CONCLUSIONS: Our case is a rare presentation showing the severe progression of a pyogenic liver abscess allowing for this communication between the lung and liver. This case emphasizes the importance of early recognition of infectious liver abscesses and early intervention. Reference #1: Gulamhussein, Patrini, Pararajasingham, Adams, Shukla, Velissaris, Lawrence, Panagiotopoulous “Hepatopulmonary Fistula: a life threatening complication of hydatid cyst” J Cardiothorac Surg 2015 Reference #2: Abbas M, Khan F, Muhsin S, Al-Dehwe “Epidemiology, Clinical features and outcome of Liver Abcsess: A single Reference Center Experience in Qatar” Oman Med J 2014 DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Kinjal Patel, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Jean Singh, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Ivan Wong, source=Web Response

19.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 2190-2199, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-780277

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in millions of patients infected worldwide and indirectly affecting even more individuals through disruption of daily living. Long-term adverse outcomes have been reported with similar diseases from other coronaviruses, namely Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). Emerging evidence suggests that COVID-19 adversely affects different systems in the human body. This review summarizes the current evidence on the short-term adverse health outcomes and assesses the risk of potential long-term adverse outcomes of COVID-19. Major adverse outcomes were found to affect different body systems: immune system (including but not limited to Guillain-Barré syndrome and paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome), respiratory system (lung fibrosis and pulmonary thromboembolism), cardiovascular system (cardiomyopathy and coagulopathy), neurological system (sensory dysfunction and stroke), as well as cutaneous and gastrointestinal manifestations, impaired hepatic and renal function. Mental health in patients with COVID-19 was also found to be adversely affected. The burden of caring for COVID-19 survivors is likely to be huge. Therefore, it is important for policy makers to develop comprehensive strategies in providing resources and capacity in the healthcare system. Future epidemiological studies are needed to further investigate the long-term impact on COVID-19 survivors.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Patient Outcome Assessment , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Organ Specificity , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
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