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1.
Int J Equity Health ; 22(1): 110, 2023 06 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234232

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hong Kong has a relatively low incidence rate of COVID-19 across the globe. Nevertheless, ethnic minorities in Hong Kong, especially South Asians (SAs) and Southeast Asians (SEAs), face numerous physical, mental, social, economic, cultural and religious challenges during the pandemic. This study explores the experiences of SA and SEA women in a predominantly Chinese metropolitan city. METHODS: Ten SA and SEA women were recruited and face-to-face interviews were conducted. Questions about participants' daily life experience, physical and mental health conditions, economic situation and social interaction amid COVID-19 pandemic were asked to assess the impact of COVID-19. RESULTS: SAs and SEAs have a distinctive family culture, and women experienced significant physical and mental impact of COVID-19 due to their unique gender role in the family. In addition to taking care of their family in Hong Kong, SA and SEA women also had to mentally and financially support family members residing in their home countries. Access to COVID-related information was restricted due to language barrier. Public health measures including social distancing imposed extra burden on ethnic minorities with limited social and religious support. CONCLUSIONS: Even when COVID-19 incidence rate is relatively low in Hong Kong, the pandemic made life even more challenging for SAs and SEAs, which is a community already struggling with language barriers, financial woes, and discrimination. This in turn could have led to greater health inequalities. Government and civil organizations should take the social determinants of health inequalities into account when implementing COVID-19-related public health policies and strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Southeast Asian People , Minority Groups/psychology
2.
Curr Psychol ; : 1-11, 2021 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322337

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has substantially induced worries and affected individual mental health and subjective well-being. Nonetheless, a high level of social capital could potentially protect individuals who suffer from mental health problems and thus promote their subjective well-being, especially under the social distancing policies during the pandemic. To this end, based on a random sample of 1053 Hong Kong adults, structural equation modeling was applied to study the path relationships between the worries of COVID-19, social capital, mental health problems, and subjective well-being. The study found that worries during the pandemic were associated with mental health and subjective well-being, through social capital as a mediator. Moreover, social capital exhibited a stronger influence on mental health and subjective well-being in the economically inactive group than in the economically active group. This study highlights the important role of social capital during the COVID-19 pandemic. While Hong Kong's COVID-19 response has primarily focused on disease prevention, it must be noted that social services and mutual-help activities are also crucial for people to withstand the crisis.

3.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1138147, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327357

ABSTRACT

Background: Primary care patients, especially those with an older age, are one of the most vulnerable populations for post-COVID-19 symptoms. Identifying predictors of post-COVID symptoms can help identify high-risk individuals for preventive care. Methods: Out of 977 primary care patients aged 55 years or above with comorbid physical and psychosocial conditions in a prospective cohort in Hong Kong, 207 patients infected in the previous 5-24 weeks were included. The three most common post-COVID-19 symptoms (breathlessness, fatigue, cognitive difficulty), which lasted beyond the 4-week acute infection period, were assessed using items from the COVID-19 Yorkshire Rehabilitation Scale (C19-YRS), together with other self-reported symptoms. Multivariable analyses were conducted to identify predictors of post-acute and long COVID-19 symptoms (5-24 weeks after infection). Results: The 207 participants had a mean age of 70.8 ± 5.7 years, 76.3% were female, and 78.7% had ≥2 chronic conditions. In total, 81.2% reported at least one post-COVID symptom (mean: 1.9 ± 1.3); 60.9, 56.5 and 30.0% reported fatigue, cognitive difficulty, and breathlessness respectively; 46.1% reported at least one other new symptom (such as other respiratory-related symptoms (14.0%), insomnia or poor sleep quality (14.0%), and ear/nose/throat symptoms (e.g., sore throat) (10.1%), etc.). Depression predicted post-COVID-19 fatigue. The female sex predicted cognitive difficulty. Receiving fewer vaccine doses (2 doses vs. 3 doses) was associated with breathlessness. Anxiety predicted a higher overall symptom severity level of the three common symptoms. Conclusion: Depression, the female sex, and fewer vaccine doses predicted post-COVID symptoms. Promoting vaccination and providing intervention to those at high-risk for post-COVID symptoms are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Adult , Female , Aged , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Chronic Disease , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue/etiology , Primary Health Care
4.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 618, 2023 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266435

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In addition to high vaccination levels, COVID-19 control requires uptake and continued adherence to personal hygiene and social distancing behaviors. It is unclear whether residents of a city with successive experience in worldwide pandemics such as SARS, would quickly adopt and maintain preventive behaviors. METHODS: A population-based, longitudinal telephone survey was conducted between in first local wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (April 2020) and third local wave (December 2020) (n = 403). The study examined factors associated with personal hygiene and social distancing behavior fatigue, as measured by reduced adherence. RESULTS: Over 9 months, face mask use increased (96.5-100%, p < 0.001). Although habitual hand hygiene remained unchanged (92.0%), blue collar workers and non-working individuals showed higher risk of hand hygiene fatigue. There was a decline (p < 0.05) in avoidance of social gatherings (81.1 to 70.7%), avoidance of public places (52.9-27.5%) and avoidance of international travel (81.9-77.4%) even with rising caseloads. Lowered perception of COVID-19 disease severity was associated with decreased avoidance of social gatherings and public places while lower education was associated with decline in avoidance of social gatherings. CONCLUSION: Even in regions with past pandemic experience, maintaining social distancing behaviors during a protracted pandemic remains a major public health challenge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Hong Kong/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Longitudinal Studies
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(3)2023 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2241471

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The emergence and persistence of symptoms after acute COVID-19 is expected to become a major burden on healthcare systems. We assessed the features of the post-COVID-19 Syndrome (Long COVID) burden in a cohort of COVID-19 patients during the fifth major wave in Hong Kong. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 135 patients with confirmed COVID-19 from Feb to Apr 2022 who utilized traditional Chinese medicine telemedicine services was conducted. The COVID-19 Yorkshire Rehabilitation Scale was administered using an online survey 12 weeks after the COVID-19 infection. Prevalence of symptom severity and functional impairments were assessed to identify burdens and patterns. The correlation between symptom severity, functional impairments, patient characteristics, and overall health was evaluated. RESULTS: The mean age was 46.8 years, with 46 (34.1%) males. Symptoms, functional impairments, and overall health worsened significantly when compared to the status prior to the infection. More than 50% reported the following sequelae 12 weeks after the acute infection: breathlessness, laryngeal or airway complications, fatigue, weakness, sleep, cognition, and anxiety. The presence of a single symptom or functional impairment significantly correlated with at least seven other problems positively, except for pain. Severity tended to be higher among vulnerable groups, including those who were chronic disease patients, older, less well educated, female, or had incomplete COVID-19 vaccinations. CONCLUSIONS: Long COVID is a significant healthcare burden among telemedicine users in Hong Kong, with complex needs for symptom and functional impairment management. Designing relevant health and rehabilitation services tailored to the needs of these patients is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Male , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Prevalence , Medicine, Chinese Traditional
6.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 8(11): e40175, 2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079993

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 Omicron BA.2 epidemic wave in Hong Kong peaked in the first quarter of 2022. Following the implementation of stringent public health measures, the daily number of reported cases fell from over 50,000 to below 2000. Although outbreaks steadily receded, the government rolled out a 3-day "voluntary universal rapid testing" campaign to invite all citizens to self-perform a rapid antigen test (RAT) daily to identify undetected prevalent infections. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the uptake and results of RAT mass screening to estimate the population's residual epidemic burden and assess the risk of further transmission. METHODS: A cross-sectional study comprising an open web-based population-based survey was conducted a week after the RAT campaign. Participants were asked to report their COVID-19 vaccination and infection history and the RAT performance and test result during the period. They were also invited to report their coliving individuals' test performance and results. Reasons for nonuptake were enquired. Testing and positive rates were age-adjusted. Determinants of undergoing RAT were identified using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS: In total, particulars from 21,769 individuals were reported by 8338 participants. The overall age-adjusted testing rate was 74.94% (95% CI 73.71%-76.18%), with over 80% of participants in the age groups between 45-84 years having self-performed RAT during the campaign period. After age-adjustment, 1.03% (95% CI 0.86%-1.21%) of participants tested positive. The positive rates in the age groups between 20-29 years and >84 years exceeded 2%. Taking into account the positive rate and 5819 reported cases during the period, the cases identified in the campaign might account for 7.65% (95% CI 6.47%-9.14%) of all infections. Testers were more likely to be female, older, not previously diagnosed with COVID-19, and have received COVID-19 vaccination. Adjusting for the number of household members, those living with a child aged <12 years and whose household members were also tested were more likely to have self-performed an RAT. Main reasons for not performing an RAT included the absence of symptoms (598/1108, 53.97%), disbelief of the appropriateness of the campaign as an antiepidemic measure (355/1108, 32.04%), and a recent COVID-19 diagnosis (332/1108, 29.96%). CONCLUSIONS: The residual population burden remained substantial in spite of the clear evidence of a receding epidemic wave. Despite caution in generalization to the Hong Kong population, the high participation rate in mass screening indicated that the voluntary RAT was well accepted, making it a feasible option for implementation as a complementary means of public health surveillance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Female , Humans , Male , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19 Vaccines , Mass Screening
7.
Frontiers in public health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2045948

ABSTRACT

Background Amid the current COVID-19 pandemic, there is an urgent need for both vaccination and revaccination (“boosting”). This study aims to identify factors associated with the intention to receive a booster dose of the coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine among individuals vaccinated with two doses and characterize their profiles in Hong Kong, a city with a low COVID-19 incidence in the initial epidemic waves. Among the unvaccinated, vaccination intention is also explored and their profiles are investigated. Methods From December 2021 - January 2022, an online survey was employed to recruit 856 Hong Kong residents aged 18 years or over from an established population-based cohort. Latent class analysis and multivariate logistic regression modeling approaches were used to characterize boosting intentions. Results Of 638 (74.5%) vaccinated among 856 eligible subjects, 42.2% intended to receive the booster dose. Four distinct profiles emerged with believers having the highest intention, followed by apathetics, fence-sitters and skeptics. Believers were older and more likely to have been vaccinated against influenza. Older age, smoking, experiencing no adverse effects from a previous COVID-19 vaccination, greater confidence in vaccines and collective responsibility, and fewer barriers in accessing vaccination services were associated with higher intentions to receive the booster dose. Of 218 unvaccinated, most were fence-sitters followed by apathetics, skeptics, and believers. Conclusion This study foretells the booster intended uptake lagging initial vaccination across different age groups and can help refine the current or future booster vaccination campaign. Given the fourth COVID-19 vaccine dose may be offered to all adults, strategies for improving boosting uptake include policies targeting young adults, individuals who experienced adverse effects from previous doses, fence-sitters, apathetics, and the general public with low trust in the health authorities.

8.
Eur J Pediatr ; 181(11): 3839-3849, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007146

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to test the influence of vaccination characteristics and gain/loss-framing of information, on parental acceptance of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination for their minor children. A discrete choice experiment was conducted among parents of children aged 0-17 years from September to October 2021 in Hong Kong. Respondents were randomly assigned to four groups with different framing of information and asked to choose hypothetical vaccination alternatives, described by seven attributes that were derived from prior qualitative interviews. A mixed logit model was adopted to analyze the effect of attributes and information framing on parental vaccination acceptance. The vaccine acceptance rates under different scenarios were also estimated. A total of 298 valid responses were obtained. It was found that the BioNTech brand, higher efficacy, less serious adverse events and more vaccination coverage in children significantly improved parental acceptance. Additionally, loss-framing increased parental acceptance compared with gain-framing, while the presentation of mortality information did not make a difference. Acceptance was also associated with parental uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine and the children's age. CONCLUSION: The findings imply that factors including gain/loss information framing, importance of vaccine characteristics, and peer influence have a significant effect on parents' decisions to get their children vaccinated. Parents with younger children had greater vaccine hesitancy, and information framing techniques should be considered in vaccination promotion for combating such vaccine hesitancy. Future studies could be conducted to identify the moderators and mediators of information framing to facilitate its implementation. WHAT IS KNOWN: • Parental acceptance of COVID-19 vaccine was found to be associated with various socio-economic and psychosocial factors, while the evidence on impact of vaccination characteristics was limited. • Behavioral interventions, including information framing, have been used to promote various health behaviors. WHAT IS NEW: • Loss-framing of information on vaccine effectiveness improves vaccine acceptance, while additional information on how the vaccine reduces death does not make a difference, which can be used to inform communication with the public in vaccination promotion. • The social norm (i.e., the vaccine uptake amongst other people) is important for increasing the parental vaccine acceptance rate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Parents/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination Coverage
9.
Comput Struct Biotechnol J ; 20: 4052-4059, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966471

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Two years into the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, populations with less built-up immunity continued to devise ways to optimize social distancing measures (SDMs) relaxation levels for outbreaks triggered by SARS-CoV-2 and its variants to resume minimal economics activities while avoiding hospital system collapse. Method: An age-stratified compartmental model featuring social mixing patterns was first fitted the incidence data in second wave in Hong Kong. Hypothetical scenario analysis was conducted by varying population mobility and vaccination coverages (VCs) to predict the number of hospital and intensive-care unit admissions in outbreaks initiated by ancestral strain and its variants (Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and Omicron). Scenarios were "unsustainable" if either of admissions was larger than the maximum of its occupancy. Results: At VC of 65%, scenarios of full SDMs relaxation (mean daily social encounters prior to COVID-19 pandemic = 14.1 contacts) for outbreaks triggered by ancestral strain, Alpha and Beta were sustainable. Restricting levels of SDMs was required such that the optimal population mobility had to be reduced to 0.9, 0.65 and 0.37 for Gamma, Delta and Omicron associated outbreaks respectively. VC improvement from 65% to 75% and 95% allowed complete SDMs relaxation in Gamma-, and Delta-driven epidemic respectively. However, this was not supported for Omicron-triggered epidemic. Discussion: To seek a path to normality, speedy vaccine and booster distribution to the majority across all age groups is the first step. Gradual or complete SDMs lift could be considered if the hybrid immunity could be achieved due to high vaccination coverage and natural infection rate among vaccinated or the COVID-19 case fatality rate could be reduced similar to that for seasonal influenza to secure hospital system sustainability.

10.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(7)2022 Jul 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1939048

ABSTRACT

Vaccination is an effective way in providing protection against COVID-19 infection and severe outcomes. However, vaccine resistance and hesitancy are a great concern among vulnerable populations including older adults who live alone or only with an older partner. This study examined their vaccination status and reasons and associated factors of vaccine resistance and hesitancy. A cross-sectional study was conducted among older adults living alone or only with an older partner in communities in Hong Kong. Participants were interviewed between October 2021 and February 2022. Logistic regression analyses were employed to examine factors associated with vaccine resistance and hesitancy. Of the 2109 included participants, the mean age was 79.3 years (SD 7.6), 1460 (69.2%) were female, 1334 (63.3%) lived alone, and 1621 (76.9%) were receiving social security support. The vaccine uptake, non-uptake (i.e., resistance), and hesitancy rates were 50.1%, 34.4%, and 15.5%, respectively. The top four reasons for vaccine resistance and hesitancy were "Not feeling in good health" (27%), "Worry about vaccine side effects" (18%), "Feeling no need" (10%), and "Lack of recommendation from doctors" (9%). Vaccine resistance and hesitancy was significantly associated with older age, living alone, more chronic conditions, fewer types of social media use, and lower self-rated health status. Similar associations can be observed in their separate analysis for vaccine resistance and vaccine hesitancy, and ever hospital admission over the past 6 months was additionally related to vaccine hesitancy. Older people who live alone or only with an older partner had a low vaccination rate. Poor health or worry about vaccine side effects were the most common reasons for their vaccine resistance and hesitancy. Actions are greatly needed to improve the uptake rate among this vulnerable population, especially those who were older, have poorer health, and use less social media.

11.
J Ment Health ; 31(4): 585-596, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1915385

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many workers experienced income reduction during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which may link to adverse mental health. AIMS: This study aimed to examine the association of current income and reduction in income during COVID-19 with anxiety and depression levels among non-healthcare workers. METHODS: This is a multi-city cross-sectional study. We used standardized questionnaires to collect information. We regrouped the current income and income reduction during COVID-19 according to the tertile and median value of each specific city. Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales-21 item short version (DASS-21) was used to assess anxiety and depression levels. We performed multinomial logistic regression to examine the association of current and reduced income with anxiety and depression. Path models were developed to outline the potential modification/indirect effect of subsidies from government. RESULTS: Large income reduction and low current income were significantly associated with more anxiety/depression symptoms. Path analysis showed that government subsidies could not significantly alleviate the impact of reduced income on anxiety/depression. CONCLUSION: Our findings showed that large income reduction and low current income were independently associated with anxiety/depression, while these symptoms may not be ameliorated by one-off government funds. This study suggests the need for long-term policies (e.g. developing sustained economic growth policies) to mitigate negative impacts of the COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
12.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 11(6): e37334, 2022 Jun 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1910907

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Up-to-date and accurate information about the health problems encountered by primary care doctors is essential to understanding the morbidity pattern of the community to better inform health care policy and practice. Morbidity surveys of doctors allow documentation of actual consultations, reflecting the patient's reason for seeking care as well as the doctor's diagnostic interpretation of the illness and management approach. Such surveys are particularly critical in the absence of a centralized primary care electronic medical record database. OBJECTIVE: With the changing sociodemographic profile of the population and implementation of health care initiatives in the past 10 years, the aim of this study is to determine the morbidity and management patterns in Hong Kong primary care during a pandemic and compare the results with the last survey conducted in 2007-2008. METHODS: This will be a prospective, practice-based survey of Hong Kong primary care doctors. Participants will be recruited by convenience and targeted sampling from both public and private sectors. Participating doctors will record the health problems and corresponding management activities for consecutive patient encounters during one designated week in each season of the year. Coding of health problems will follow the International Classification of Primary Care, Second Edition. Descriptive statistics will be used to calculate the prevalence of health problems and diseases as well as the rates of management activities (referral, investigation, prescription, preventive care). Nonlinear mixed effects models will assess the differences between the private and public sectors as well as factors associated with morbidity and management patterns in primary care. RESULTS: The data collection will last from March 1, 2021, to August 31, 2022. As of April 2022, 176 doctor-weeks of data have been collected. CONCLUSIONS: The results will provide information about the health of the community and inform the planning and allocation of health care resources. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04736992; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04736992. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): DERR1-10.2196/37334.

13.
Challenges (20781547) ; 13(1):17-N.PAG, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1911208

ABSTRACT

Background: To fight the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, it is important for the population to keep abreast of COVID-19 updates and comply with the suggested preventive measures. Understanding the influence of popular dissemination channels under the surge of an 'infodemic' is crucial, as the population may receive conflicting information from various sources. Objective: This study aimed to examine the association between information source usage and COVID-19-preventive measures compliance. Methods: An online cross-sectional study was conducted in February 2020. Four COVID-19-preventive strategies, including 'hand hygiene', 'mask wearing', 'household hygiene', and 'social distancing', were studied with respect to their usage from three common health information sources and three dissemination channels. Logistic regressions were modelled to study the odds ratio of the preventive behavior compliance in terms of information source usage. Results: A total of 1048 respondents completed the survey and the sample demonstrated high compliance in hand hygiene (81.4%) and mask wearing (93.5%), but lower compliance in household hygiene (22.4%) and social distancing (65.7%). Females and chronic diseases patients were found more likely to adopt COVID-19-preventive measures. Participants recorded highest usage in social media (80.1%) among information sources and respondents with frequent social media use had improved compliances in the preventive behaviors studied. Conclusions: The study presented evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of social media in disseminating information related to complying COVID-19-preventive behaviors. The impact of social media in spreading COVID-19 information should be recognized, despite the concerns regarding misinformation. With disciplined use, social media may help to halt the spread of COVID-19 and other communicable diseases by encouraging community participation. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Challenges (20781547) is the property of MDPI and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

14.
Vaccine ; 40(22): 3046-3054, 2022 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783818

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccination is an important preventive measure against the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic. We aimed to examine the willingness to vaccination and influencing factors among college students in China. METHODS: From March 18 to April 26, 2021, we conducted a cross-sectional online survey among college students from 30 universities in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. The survey was composed of the sociodemographic information, psychological status, experience during pandemic, the willingness of vaccination and related information. Students' attitudes towards vaccination were classified as 'vaccine acceptance', 'vaccine hesitancy', and 'vaccine resistance'. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the influencing factors associated with vaccine hesitancy and resistance. RESULTS: Among 23,143 students who completed the survey, a total of 22,660 participants were included in the final analysis with an effective rate of 97.9% after excluding invalid questionnaires. A total of 60.6% of participants would be willing to receive COVID-19 vaccine, 33.4% were hesitant to vaccination, and 6.0% were resistant to vaccination. Social media platforms and government agencies were the main sources of information vaccination. Worry about the efficacy and adverse effects of vaccine were the top two common reason of vaccine hesitancy and resistance. Multiple multinomial logistic regression analysis identified that participants who worried about the adverse effects of vaccination were more likely to be vaccine hesitancy (aOR = 2.44, 95% CI = 2.30, 2.58) and resistance (aOR = 2.71, 95% CI = 2.40, 3.05). CONCLUSION: More than half of college students are willing to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, whereas nearly one-third college students are still hesitant or resistant. It is crucial to provide sufficient and scientific information on the efficacy and safety of vaccine through social media and government agencies platforms to promote vaccine progress against COVID-19 and control the pandemic in China.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Vaccination
15.
Collegian ; 29(5): 612-620, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1693751

ABSTRACT

Background: During the early phase of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic, health care workers had elevated levels of psychological distress. Historical exposure to disease outbreak may shape different pandemic responses among experienced health care workers. Aim: Considering the unique experience of the 2003 SARS outbreak in Hong Kong, this study examined the association between prior epidemic work experience and anxiety levels, and the mediating role of perceived severity of COVID-19 and SARS in nurses. Methods: In March 2020, a cross-sectional survey targeting practising nurses in Hong Kong was conducted during the early phase of the COVID-19 epidemic. The interrelationships among participants' work experience during the SARS outbreak, perceived severity of SARS and COVID-19, and anxiety level were elucidated using structural equation model (SEM). Findings: Of 1,061 eligible nurses, a majority were female (90%) with a median age of 39 years (IQR = 32-49). A significant and negative indirect association was identified between SARS experience and anxiety levels (B=-0.04, p=0.04) in the SEM with a satisfactory fitness (CFI=0.95; RMSEA=0.06). SARS-experienced nurses perceived SARS to be less severe (B=-0.17, p=0.01), translated an equivalent perception to COVID-19 (B=1.29, p<0.001) and resulted in a lower level of anxiety (B=0.19, p<0.001). Conclusions: The less vigorous perception towards the severity of SARS and COVID-19 may explain SARS-experienced nurses' less initial epidemic-induced anxiety. The possible role of outbreak-experienced nurses in supporting outbreak-inexperienced nurses, both emotionally and technically, should be considered when an epidemic commences. Interventions aiming to facilitate the understanding of emerging virus should also be in place.

17.
Transl Psychiatry ; 12(1): 49, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692636

ABSTRACT

In recent decades, respiratory infections, including SARS, HINI and the currently spreading COVID-19, caused by various viruses such as influenza and coronavirus have seriously threatened human health. It has generated inconsistent recommendations on the mandatory use of facemasks across countries on a population level due to insufficient evidence on the efficacy of facemask use among the general population. This meta-analysis aimed to explore (1) the efficacy of facemask use on preventing respiratory infections, and (2) the perceptions, intentions, and practice about facemask use among the general population worldwide. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, Cochrane, bioRxiv, and medRxiv databases since inception to August 17, 2020. From 21,341 records identified, eight RCTs on facemask in preventing infections and 78 studies on perception, intention, and practice of facemask use among the general population were included in the analysis. The meta-analysis of RCTs found a significant protective effect of facemask intervention (OR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.71-0.99; I2 = 0%). This protective effect was even more pronounced when the intervention duration was more than two weeks (OR = 0.76; 95% CI = 0.66-0.88; I2 = 0%). The meta-analysis of observational studies on perception, intention, and practice on facemask use showed that 71% of respondents perceived facemasks to be effective for infection prevention, 68% of respondents would wear facemasks, and 54% of respondents wore facemasks for preventing respiratory infections. Differences in perception, intention, and practice behavior of facemask use in different regions may be related to the impact of respiratory infections, regional culture, and policies. The governments and relevant organizations should make effort to reduce the barriers in the use of facemasks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Tract Infections , Humans , Masks , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
18.
European Journal of Psychotraumatology ; 13(1), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1679275

ABSTRACT

Background Due to active involvement with patients for COVID-19 treatments, nurses are susceptible to adverse psychological outcomes amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite the distress, studies have suggested that nurses are able to experience positive changes (i.e. posttraumatic growth;PTG) during the pandemic. Research on other populations has also indicated that COVID-19-specific worries and work-related coping resources are associated with people’s positive changes during the pandemic. Objective This study examined how socio-demographic characteristics, COVID-19-related worries, and work-related variables (satisfaction with work and workplace pandemic guidelines) were associated with PTG among nurses in Hong Kong. Methods Nurses (N = 1510) working in hospitals and community settings were recruited through nursing associations in Hong Kong between 8 August 2020 and 22 September 2020. They were invited to complete a cross-sectional survey measuring their sociodemographic characteristics, COVID-19 worries, and satisfaction with work and workplace pandemic-control measures. Results Results from hierarchical regressions found that those working non-full-time (β = −0.06), affiliating with a religion (β = 0.24), having higher COVID-19-related worries and psychological distress (βs ranging from 0.12–0.15), and having higher work satisfaction (β = 0.14) were associated with higher PTG (ps < .05). Moreover, a significant interaction between psychological distress and satisfaction with workplace pandemic control guidelines emerged in explaining PTG (β = 0.08, p < .05), such that guideline satisfaction was only associated with higher PTG among those with higher distress (β = 0.09, p = .03), but not those with lower distress (β = −0.05, p > .05). Conclusions Nurses in Hong Kong did report positive changes amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Future studies could focus on the contributing factors of PTG to design for effective strategies to enhance resources for nurses to promote positive psychosocial outcomes. HIGHLIGHTS Work satisfaction was associated with nurses’ posttraumatic growth (PTG) amid COVID-19. Workplace pandemic control guidelines satisfaction was associated with PTG only among nurses with higher distress. To enhance nurses’ PTG, those work-related factors should be addressed.

19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674631

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Living arrangements might greatly impact psychosocial health and quality of life, particularly during the COVID-19 lockdown. This pilot study aimed to examine the association of different common living arrangements with psychosocial health, life satisfaction, and quality of life among Chinese adults during the COVID-19 lockdown. METHODS: An anonymous online survey was conducted using convenience sampling through the WeChat application in February 2020. Mental health (Patient Health Questionnaire-2, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-2, post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, Patient Health Questionnaire-15, and meaning in life), social health (UCLA-3), quality of life (EQ5D and EQ-VAS), and life satisfaction were measured. Linear regression models were used. RESULT: The study included 1245 adults (mean age: 34.14 ± 10.71) in China. Compared to other living arrangements, participants who "live with partner and children" or "live with partner, children and parents" were more likely to have better outcomes of mental health, social health, quality of life, and life satisfaction. Participants who "live with parents or grandparents" or "live with partner" were more likely to have better health outcomes compared with those who "live with children" or "live alone". CONCLUSION: Living with a partner, children, and/or parents could be a protective factor against poor psychosocial health during lockdown and quarantine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Adult , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Personal Satisfaction , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
20.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 13(1): 2005346, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672008

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to active involvement with patients for COVID-19 treatments, nurses are susceptible to adverse psychological outcomes amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite the distress, studies have suggested that nurses are able to experience positive changes (i.e. posttraumatic growth; PTG) during the pandemic. Research on other populations has also indicated that COVID-19-specific worries and work-related coping resources are associated with people's positive changes during the pandemic. Objective: This study examined how socio-demographic characteristics, COVID-19-related worries, and work-related variables (satisfaction with work and workplace pandemic guidelines) were associated with PTG among nurses in Hong Kong. Methods: Nurses (N = 1510) working in hospitals and community settings were recruited through nursing associations in Hong Kong between 8 August 2020 and 22 September 2020. They were invited to complete a cross-sectional survey measuring their sociodemographic characteristics, COVID-19 worries, and satisfaction with work and workplace pandemic-control measures. Results: Results from hierarchical regressions found that those working non-full-time (ß = -0.06), affiliating with a religion (ß = 0.24), having higher COVID-19-related worries and psychological distress (ßs ranging from 0.12-0.15), and having higher work satisfaction (ß = 0.14) were associated with higher PTG (ps < .05). Moreover, a significant interaction between psychological distress and satisfaction with workplace pandemic control guidelines emerged in explaining PTG (ß = 0.08, p < .05), such that guideline satisfaction was only associated with higher PTG among those with higher distress (ß = 0.09, p = .03), but not those with lower distress (ß = -0.05, p > .05). Conclusions: Nurses in Hong Kong did report positive changes amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Future studies could focus on the contributing factors of PTG to design for effective strategies to enhance resources for nurses to promote positive psychosocial outcomes.


Antecedentes: Debido a la participación activa de pacientes en los tratamientos de COVID-19, las/os enfermeras son susceptibles a resultados psicológicos adversos en medio de la pandemia de COVID-19. A pesar de la angustia, los estudios han sugerido que las(os) enfermeras(os) pueden experimentar cambios positivos (es decir, crecimiento postraumático; CPT) durante la pandemia. Investigación en otras poblaciones también ha indicado que las preocupaciones específicas por COVID-19 y los recursos de afrontamiento relacionados con el trabajo están asociados a cambios positivos de las personas durante la pandemia.Objetivo: Este estudio examinó cómo las características sociodemográficas, las preocupaciones relacionadas a COVID-19 y las variables relacionadas con el trabajo (satisfacción con el trabajo y pautas pandémicas en el lugar de trabajo) se asociaron con el CPT entre las(os) enfermeras(os) de Hong Kong.Métodos: Las(os) enfermeras(os) (N = 1510) que trabajan en hospitales y entornos comunitarios fueron reclutadas(os) a través de asociaciones de enfermería en Hong Kong entre el 8 de agosto del 2020 y el 22 de septiembre del 2020. Los participantes fueron invitados a completar una encuesta transversal que midió sus características sociodemográficas, preocupaciones sobre COVID-19 y satisfacción con el trabajo y las medidas de control de pandemias en el lugar de trabajo.Resultados: Los resultados de regresiones jerárquicas encontraron que aquellos que: no trabajaban a tiempo completo (ß = −0.06), se afiliaban a una religión (ß = 0.24), tenían mayores preocupaciones y angustia psicológica relacionadas por COVID-19 (ßs que oscilan entre 0.12­0.15) y tenían una mayor satisfacción laboral (ß = 0.14), se asociaron con CPT más alto (ps < .05). Además, una interacción significativa entre la angustia psicológica y la satisfacción con las pautas de control de la pandemia en el lugar de trabajo, surgió al explicar el CPT (ß = 0.08, p < .05), de modo que la satisfacción de la guía sólo se asoció con un CPT más alto entre aquéllos con mayor angustia (ß = 0.09, p = .03), pero no en aquéllos con menor angustia (ß = −0.05, p > .05).Conclusiones: Las(os) enfermeras(os) en Hong Kong informaron cambios positivos en medio de la pandemia por COVID-19. Los estudios futuros podrían centrarse en los factores que contribuyen a la CPT para diseñar estrategias eficaces con el fin de mejorar los recursos de las(os) enfermeras(os) para promover resultados psicosociales positivos.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Nurses/psychology , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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