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1.
American Journal of the Medical Sciences ; 365(Supplement 1):S26, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2235935

ABSTRACT

Case Report:We present a 5-year-old male with two days of fever, cough, vomiting, and loose stools. His history is significant for premature birth (35 weeks gestational age) and shunted hydrocephalus. A ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt was placed 6 days prior to presentation. Parental report included episodes of post-tussive, nonbloody, non-bilious emesis, poor oral intake, tachypnea, and increased work of breathing. Physical examination demonstrated a dehydrated infant with sunken fontanelles. He had no notable rash, no lymphadenopathy, and clear conjunctiva. His VP shunt site appeared normal without swelling or erythema. Initial evaluation showed elevated inflammatory markers -ESR 51 and CRP 12.32 mg/dL. A viral respiratory PCR panel returned positive for coronavirus (not SARS-CoV-2). A head CT scan and shunt radiography series showed no abnormalities with his shunt. The following morning, Radiology reported an incidental retropharyngeal fluid collection on a re-read of the patient's initial CT scan. A neck CT was obtained and demonstrated a fluid pocket with secondary mass effect in addition to bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. Screening blood cultures were negative. The patient remained febrile (tmax 103.6F) and developed a transaminitis (ALT 264.9, AST 654), elevated fibrinogen 476, elevated INR 1.4, and low albumin 2.1. Abdominal ultrasound showed a normal the liver and biliary tract. His transaminitis resolved without treatment. The next day, the patient developed lip erythema and conjunctival injection. An echocardiogram showed a dilated right coronary artery (z-score of 3.59) and his inflammatory markers (ESR 26, CRP 9.63) remained elevated. Treatment was initiated with IVIG and moderate-dose aspirin. The patient defervesced, and he remained afebrile for over 48 hours prior to discharge. A repeat echocardiogram 2 days later showed a slight reduction in coronary artery dilatation (z-score 3.39). Hewas discharged on lowdose aspirin, and followed up with cardiology as an outpatient. Kawasaki's Disease (KD) is most common in children from ages 1 to 4 years and is classically characterized by persistent fever with a constellation of symptoms including limbal sparing conjunctivitis, cervical lymphadenopathy, polymorphous rash, strawberry tongue, oral changes, and extremity changes. Our patient presented at a younger age with a concurrent diagnosis of coronavirus upper respiratory tract infection. His atypical hospital course and incidental finding of retropharyngeal edema and transaminitis increased the clinical suspicion for KD. His symptoms rapidly improved after administration of IVIG. Younger patients are at an increased risk for severe complications of KD including coronary aneurysm. KD has been shown in the literature to have an association with coronavirus infection as well as presentation with retropharyngeal edema. Clinicians should consider KD in their differential even if patients do not meet all criteria for diagnosis on initial presentation. Copyright © 2023 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation.

2.
American Journal of the Medical Sciences ; 365(Supplement 1):S216, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2233912

ABSTRACT

Purpose of Study: Report a rare case of onset of seronegative, juvenile dermatomyositis likely potentiated by Covid-19 infection Methods Used: Case analysis and literature research Summary of Results: A 7 year-old previously healthy male presented with 3 weeks of progressive, bilateral upper and lower extremity weakness, difficulty swallowing, voice changes, periorbital edema, and rash. Recent history was notable for diagnoses of COVID-19 one month prior to presentation and streptococcal pharyngitis 2 months prior to presentation. Notably, there is a family history of systemic lupus erythematosus. On examination, the patient demonstrated bilateral periorbital swelling with purple discoloration of the upper eyelids, a violaceous, pruritic, macular rash on his upper extremities and on his abdomen. Musculoskeletal exam was significant for severe axial (strength 2/5) and proximal (strength 3/5) muscleweakness with notable inability to sit unsupported or maintain head control. His neurologic exam was nonfocal;however, diffuse hyporeflexia in both upper and lower extremities were elicited. Initial screening labs were notable for mild transaminitis;positive ANA (1:80 in speckled pattern), negative ANCA, negative dsDNA/Anti- Sm, elevated aldolase of 10.3, CK 464, and LDH 665;normal thyroid studies and normal inflammatory markers. MRI with and without contrast of the spine indicated diffuse myositis of all muscle groups. Due to concern for autoimmune mediated myositis, Rheumatology was involved early in the patient's course. Empiric treatment was initiated early in the patient's presentation with IVIG, steroids, methotrexate, and plaquenil leading to gradual improvement in symptoms. Subsequent muscle biopsy was consistent with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Conclusion(s): JDM is rare, occurring in 1 to 15 per million children. It classically presents with proximal myopathy and dermatologic findings of Gattron's papules, a heliotrope and malar rash. Its pathophysiology is not yet well defined but is thought to be a humoral mediated autoimmune disease. Muscle biopsies characteristically show perifascicular and perivascular infiltration. Early diagnosis and treatment with steroids, immune modulators, and physical therapy is critical to limit muscle atrophy. Viral infections are known triggers of rheumatologic diseases broadly;however, the more pronounced type 1 interferon response associated with COVID-19, which is known to be a driving pathway of JDM, may be a risk factor for severe, recalcitrant disease. Future research is needed to better identify involved pathophysiology and target future treatment efforts. Additionally, more education and case reports could focus on dermatologic presentations of individuals with pigmented skin. Copyright © 2023 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation.

3.
The American Journal of the Medical Sciences ; 365:S216, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2211712
4.
Applied Mathematics and Nonlinear Sciences ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2198284

ABSTRACT

This study uses the event study method to study and analyse the impact of the release of policy information related to the COVID-19 epidemic on the changes in the stock prices of listed companies of property service enterprises in China. The results show that the Hong Kong capital market has been greatly affected by the release of policy information related to the COVID-19 epidemic. Additionally, the study demonstrates that the policy effect of the introduction of policy information related to the COVID-19 epidemic exists in the short term, and that the effectiveness of policy information related to the COVID-19 epidemic will change over time.

5.
Taiwanese Political Science Review ; 25(1):1-50, 2021.
Article in Chinese | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1574275

ABSTRACT

Amid the coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak, how do the Taiwanese public evaluate the performance of the United States’ and Chinese governments in handling the pandemic? How should people make judgments when the international situation and information about the coronavirus disease keep changing? Using “image theory as its research framework, this study explores whether the Taiwanese public’s impressions of U.S. and Chinese leaders and China’s military threat toward Taiwan affect their perceptions of the U.S. and China governments’ responses to Covid-19. We construct three variables: impression of U.S. leaders, impression of Chinese leaders, and enemy image. We utilize the 2020 China Image Survey and an “ordered logit model” to probe the effects of the leaders’ impressions and military threat when evaluating a government’s response. The findings reveal that Taiwanese people who have a better impression of a country’s leaders are more likely to rate that country’s government’s performance more positively;after removing the effect of the military threat, people who are fond of China tend to evaluate the Chinese government’s response more positively than that of the U.S. government. The results largely confirm the predictions of image theory. When information is complex, people are more prone to relying on their impressions of a country’s leaders—rather than on factual information— as the basis for their evaluations of government performance. This tendency is particularly pronounced in times of crisis, such as the Covid-19 pandemic. Moreover, China’s military threat toward Taiwan does not affect the Taiwanese people’s assessment of government performance in other countries;it is only limited to the country where the threat originated. © 2021, Taiwanese Political Science Association. All rights reserved.

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