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1.
Transfusion ; 61(5): 1542-1550, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096956

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has placed additional stressors on physician lives. In this study, we report findings from a survey conducted among attending physician (AP) members of the American Society for Apheresis (ASFA) to elucidate the status of their well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic as well as resources provided or actions taken by their institutions and themselves personally to maintain or improve their well-being. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A 17-question, voluntary, IRB-approved survey regarding well-being was distributed to the ASFA AP members between August 26, 2020 and September 16, 2020. The descriptive analyses were reported as number and frequency of respondents for each question. Non-parametric chi-square tests, ANOVA, and paired t-tests were performed to determine differences in categorical variables, changes in well-being scores, and compare time points, respectively. RESULTS: Based on the responses of 70 attending level physicians representing the United States (U.S., 53, 75.7%) and outside the U.S. (17, 24.3%), the following were observed: (1) COVID-19 negatively affects the well-being of a sub-population of APs, (2) neither institutional nor individual measures to improve well-being completely resolved the problem of decreased AP well-being during the pandemic, and (3) personal actions may be superior to institutional resources. CONCLUSION: There is a widespread decline in AP well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic that was not adequately improved by institutional or personal resources/actions taken. Institutions and physicians must work together to implement strategies including resources and actions that could further improve AP physician well-being during a public health crisis.


Subject(s)
Blood Component Removal , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Physicians , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , United States/epidemiology
2.
J Clin Apher ; 35(5): 460-468, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064369

ABSTRACT

The wide spread availability and use of sophisticated high-speed telecommunication networks coupled with inexpensive and easily accessible computing capacity have catalyzed the creation of new tools and strategies for healthcare delivery. Such tools and strategies are of value to apheresis medicine (AM) practitioners if they improve delivery of patient care, enhance safety during a therapeutic apheresis (TA) intervention, facilitate care access, advance technical capabilities of apheresis devices, and/or elevate quality performance within TA programs. In the past several years, healthcare delivery systems' adoption of telecommunication technologies has been fostered by organizational financial and quality improvement objectives. More recently, adoption of telehealth technologies has been catalyzed by the COVID-19 pandemic as these technologies enhance both patient and provider safety in an era of social distancing. These changes will also influence the delivery of TA services which now can be generally viewed in a tripartite model format comprised of traditional hospital-based fixed site locales, mobile TA operations and lately an evolving telemedicine remote management model now reffered to as telapheresis (TLA). This communication developed by the Public Affairs and Advocacy Committee of the American Society for Apheresis (ASFA) and endorsed by its Board of Directors, reviews and describes various aspects of established and evolving electronic technologies related to TLA and the practice of AM. In subsequent companion publications, additional aspects to TLA will be explored and ASFA's vision of reasonable, regulatory compliant and high-quality TLA practices will be expounded.


Subject(s)
Blood Component Removal/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Humans , Mobile Health Units , Societies, Medical
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