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1.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 671667, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643500

ABSTRACT

Background: In this study, we investigated the relationship between serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level and disease progression and prognosis of patients with COVID-19. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the information of 1,751 patients with COVID-19 from Leishenshan Hospital in Wuhan, China. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses as well as Logistics regression analyses, and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to determine the association between LDH levels and the prognosis of COVID-19 patients. Results: LDH was an independent risk factor for in-hospital death no matter it was taken as classified variable and continuous variable (all P = 0.001) but not for severe or critical illness status. The Kaplan-Meier curves for LDH level showed that an elevated level of LDH was associated with in-hospital death. Conclusions: In patients with COVID-19, the increased LDH level is associated with a higher risk of negative clinical prognosis and higher mortality. This will provide a reference for clinicians and researchers to understand, diagnose, and treat patients with COVID-19. Further prospective studies with larger sample sizes are needed to verify these findings.

2.
Brain Behav ; 12(2): e2492, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1640676

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious mental health condition that is triggered by a terrifying event. We aimed to investigate the occurrence and risk factors of PTSD among discharged COVID-19 patients. METHODS: This study included 144 discharged COVID-19 patients. PTSD was assessed by using validated cut-offs of the impact of event scale-revised (IES-R, score ≥25). All patients completed a detailed questionnaire survey, and clinical parameters were routinely measured in the hospital. Binary logistic regression models were applied to identify factors associated with PTSD. RESULTS: Of the 144 participants with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19, the occurrence of PTSD was 16.0%. In multivariable analyses, age above 40 years (adjusted OR [95% CI], 5.19 [2.17-12.32]), female sex (adjusted OR [95% CI], 7.82 [3.18-18.21]), current smoker (adjusted OR [95% CI], 6.72 [3.23-15.26]), and ≥3 involved pulmonary lobes (adjusted OR [95% CI], 5.76 [1.19-15.71]) were significantly associated with a higher risk of PTSD. Conversely, history of hypertension and serum hemoglobin levels were significantly associated with a lower risk of PTSD with adjusted ORs (95% CI) of 0.37 (0.12-0.87) and 0.91 (0.82-0.96), respectively. CONCLUSION: Old age, gender (being female), current smoking, bacterial pneumonia, and ≥3 involved pulmonary lobes were associated with an increased occurrence of PTSD among discharged COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Patient Discharge , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
3.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 636999, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555719

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has evolved into a pandemic. We hypothesized that biochemical indicators of liver function may help determine the prognosis of COVID-19 patients. Methods: Patient information was collected from the Wuhan-Leishenshan hospital. Logistic and Cox regression analyses, Kaplan-Meier curves, and Curve fitting were used to determine the correlation between elevated levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), and AST/ALT and severity of disease/mortality. Results: Logistic and Cox regression analyses and Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that COVID-19 progression correlated with elevated levels of AST and AST/ALT. The odds ratios for elevated levels of AST and AST/ALT in patients were 0.818 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.274-2.441, P = 0.035) and 2.055 (95% CI: 1.269-3.327, P = 0.003), respectively; the hazard ratios were 4.195 (95% CI: 1.219-14.422, P = 0.023) and 3.348 (95% CI: 1.57-7.139, P = 0.002), respectively. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves demonstrated that patients with elevated AST and AST/ALT levels had a higher risk of developing severe COVID-19. Conclusion: Elevated AST and AST/ALT levels correlated with severity of COVID-19 and mortality. Liver function tests may help clinicians in determining the prognosis of patients undergoing treatment for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitals , Humans , Liver , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 687220, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291017

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic poses a global threat, and identification of its prognostic biomarkers could prove invaluable. Fibrinogen (FIB) could be one such indicator as coagulation and fibrinolysis abnormalities are common among COVID-19 patients. We examined the role of FIB levels in the prognosis of COVID-19. Methods: This retrospective cohort study enrolled 1,643 COVID-19 patients from the Leishenshan Hospital in Wuhan, China. The follow-up was conducted from February 8, 2020 to April 15, 2020. The cohort was divided into three groups according to the FIB level on admission, and associations with mortality and disease severity were determined using Cox and logistic regression analyses, respectively. Further, Kaplan-Meier (K-M) analyses by log-rank tests were used to assess the survival of patients with varying FIB levels. Results: Patients with FIB < 2.2 g/L [hazard ratio (HR): 9.02, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.91-42.59, P = 0.006] and >4.2 g/L (HR: 4.79, 95% CI: 1.14-20.20, P = 0.033) showed higher mortality risks compared to those with FIB between 2.2 and 4.2 g/L. The survival curves showed similar results in K-M analyses (P < 0.001). Additionally, an elevated FIB level was associated with a greater risk of developing critical disease (odds ratio: 2.16, 95% CI: 1.04-4.46, P = 0.038) than a FIB level within the normal range. Conclusion: Abnormal FIB levels may be associated with mortality risk among COVID-19 patients and could predict critical disease development. Thus, assessment of FIB levels may assist in determining the prognosis of COVID-19 patients.

5.
Build Environ ; 201: 108009, 2021 Aug 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252536

ABSTRACT

In previous reports, the positive SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid was detected in the fecal samples from confirmed pneumonia patients, suggesting a high probability of the fecal-oral transmission. To date, however, the role played by the drainage system of a high-rise building in the virus transmission is not clear and especially studies on the dynamics mechanism behind is scarce. From this point of view, the present work carries out a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to investigate the effects of the water seal effectiveness of the floor drain, the negative/positive pressures (P 1 , P 2 ) in the bathroom, temperature differential (ΔT), outside wind velocity (v), the piping fittings and the negative pressure at the cowl (P 3 ) on the transmission of the virus-laden aerosol particles in a drainage system of a typical 7-storeys residential building. The CFD models are first validated by the previous experiments in literature. Numerical results imply that the drainage system might play an essential role to the virus transmission. Then, results indicate that, the leakage risk of the aerosol particles via the floor drain with inefficient water-seal (UFD) mainly exists at the upper floors above the neutral pressure level (NPL). Besides, the negative and positive pressures at the bathroom can enhance and reduce the exposure risk of aerosol particles from the corresponding UFD, respectively. The ΔT increasing does not modify the location of the NPL. Moreover, the exposure risk of aerosol particles can be effectively avoided by the well water-sealed floor drains and/or the presence of a proper negative pressure at the cowl on the top floor. Finally, based on the CFD results, several protection suggestions on the drainage system and human activities are provided.

6.
Front Pharmacol ; 12: 587816, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172974

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease- (COVID-19-) related renal function abnormality is associated with poor prognosis. However, the clinical significance of dynamic changes in renal function indicators has not been studied, and no studies have evaluated the renal function in COVID-19 patients by cystatin C. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of abnormal renal function on admission on prognosis of COVID-19 patients and the prognostic value of various renal function indicators. Methods: A total of 1,764 COVID-19 patients without a history of chronic kidney disease were categorized into two groups, an elevated cystatin C group and a normal cystatin C group, based on the results of renal function tests on admission. The clinical characteristics were compared between the two groups, and logistic or Cox regression analyses were performed to explore the associations between elevated cystatin C/serum creatinine levels and disease severity and survival. We also performed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, Kaplan-Meier survival, and curve fitting analyses. Results: When adjusted for several significant clinical variables, elevated cystatin C levels on admission were independent predictors of disease severity (p < 0.001), and elevated creatinine levels were independent predictors of death (p = 0.020). Additionally, the ROC curve analysis shows that elevated cystatin C levels [area under the curve (AUC): 0.656] have a better predictive value for disease severity than elevated creatinine levels (AUC: 0.540). The survival curves of patients with elevated cystatin C/creatinine levels show a sharper decline than those of patients with normal cystatin C/creatinine levels (p < 0.001). The curve fitting analysis revealed that, compared to the flat curves of cystatin C and creatinine levels for patients who survived, the curves for patients who died kept rising, and cystatin C levels rose above the normal range earlier than creatinine. Conclusions: Elevated cystatin C, which occurs earlier than serum creatinine, is useful for the early detection of renal function abnormality and might have better predictive value for disease severity in COVID-19 patients, while elevated serum creatinine may have a better predictive value for risks of death.

7.
ESC Heart Fail ; 8(1): 644-651, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064351

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Many studies have explored the clinical characteristics of patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19), especially patients with cardiovascular disease. However, associated mechanisms and markers remain to be further investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of α-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (α-HBDH) levels on disease progression and prognosis of patients with COVID-19. METHODS AND RESULTS: One thousand seven hundred and fifty-one patients from the Leishenshan hospital in Wuhan were divided into elevated and normal groups by α-HBDH level, and the clinical information between the two groups was compared retrospectively. The main outcome evaluation criteria included in-hospital death and disease severity. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses, survival curves, logistic regression, and receiver operating characteristic curve models were performed to explore the relationship between elevated α-HBDH and the two outcomes. Besides, curve fitting analyses were conducted to analyse the relationship between computed tomography score and survival. Among 1751 patients with confirmed COVID-19, 15 patients (0.87%) died. The mean (SD) age of patients was 58 years in normal α-HBDH group and 66 years in elevated α-HBDH group (P < 0.001). The mortality during hospitalization was 0.26% (4 of 1559) for patients with normal α-HBDH levels and 5.73% (11 of 192) for those with elevated α-HBDH levels (P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox analysis confirmed an association between elevated α-HBDH levels and higher risk of in-hospital mortality [hazard ratio: 4.411, 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.127-17.260; P = 0.033]. Multivariate logistic regression for disease severity and α-HBDH levels showed significant difference between both groups (odds ratio = 3.759; 95% CI, 1.895-7.455; P < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier curves also illustrated the survival difference between normal and elevated α-HBDH patients (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our study found that serum α-HBDH is an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality and disease severity among COVID-19 patients. α-HBDH assessment may aid clinicians in identifying high-risk individuals among COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Hydroxybutyrate Dehydrogenase/blood , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/mortality , China/epidemiology , Disease Progression , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
8.
Front Public Health ; 8: 596168, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1055005

ABSTRACT

Background: Six months since the outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), the pandemic continues to grow worldwide, although the outbreak in Wuhan, the worst-hit area, has been controlled. Thus, based on the clinical experience in Wuhan, we hypothesized that there is a relationship between the patient's CO2 levels and prognosis. Methods: COVID-19 patients' information was retrospectively collected from medical records at the Leishenshan Hospital, Wuhan. Logistic and Cox regression analyses were conducted to determine the correlation between decreased CO2 levels and disease severity or mortality risk. The Kaplan-Meier curve analysis was coupled with the log-rank test to understand COVID-19 progression in patients with decreased CO2 levels. Curve fitting was used to confirm the correlation between computed tomography scores and CO2 levels. Results: Cox regression analysis showed that the mortality risk of COVID-19 patients correlated with decreased CO2 levels. The adjusted hazard ratios for decreased CO2 levels in COVID-19 patients were 8.710 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.773-27.365, P < 0.001], and 4.754 (95% CI: 1.380-16.370, P = 0.013). The adjusted odds ratio was 0.950 (95% CI: 0.431-2.094, P = 0.900). The Kaplan-Meier survival curves demonstrated that patients with decreased CO2 levels had a higher risk of mortality. Conclusions: Decreased CO2 levels increased the mortality risk of COVID-19 patients, which might be caused by hyperventilation during mechanical ventilation. This finding provides important insights for clinical treatment recommendations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Carbon Dioxide/blood , Hyperventilation/diagnosis , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Chemical Analysis , Blood Coagulation Tests , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hyperventilation/etiology , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
9.
Front Pharmacol ; 11: 600592, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024518

ABSTRACT

Background: D-dimer is a small protein fragment and high levels of D-dimer have been associated with increased mortality in patients presenting to emergency departments with infection. Previous studies have reported increased levels of D-dimer in COVID-19; however, it is unclear whether an increased D-dimer level provides early warning of poor prognosis. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the usefulness of D-dimer as an early indicator of prognosis in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of patients with COVID-19 admitted to Leishenshan Hospital in Wuhan, China, from February 15 to March 30, 2020. The final date of follow-up was April 11, 2020. Results: Of the 1,643 patients with COVID-19, 691 had elevated D-dimer levels. Their median age was 65 years. Of the patients with elevated D-dimer levels, 45% had comorbidities, with cardiovascular disease (205 [29.7%]) being the most common. Patients with elevated D-dimer were more likely to require treatment with high-flow oxygen, anticoagulation, antibiotics, and admission to the intensive care unit They were also more likely to have increased interleukin-6, monocytes, and lymphocytes. Patients with elevated D-dimer levels had significantly higher mortality than those with normal or low D-dimer levels. Conclusion: In patients with COVID-19, elevated D-dimer was associated with abnormal immunity, underlying disease, increased disease severity, and increased mortality. Taken together, D-dimer may be a marker for the early warning of disease severity and increased risk of death. These findings provide insights into the potential risk of elevated D-dimer in patients with COVID-19.

10.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 7: 598870, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948038

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused a large number of deaths. Some patients with severe or critical COVID-19 have been observed to have elevated bilirubin levels. Studies on the association of bilirubin level and mortality in patients with COVID-19 are limited. This study aimed to examine the role of bilirubin levels in COVID-19 severity and mortality. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in Leishenshan Hospital in Wuhan, China. Cox regression analyses and logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate the risks for mortality and disease severity, respectively. Kaplan-Meier analyses with log-rank tests were performed to assess the association between bilirubin level and survival. Results: In total, 1,788 patients with COVID-19 were included in the analysis. 5.8% (4/69) of patients in the elevated serum total bilirubin (STB) group died, compared to 0.6% (11/1,719) of patients in the non-elevated STB group. The median alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities in the elevated STB group were 29 U/L [interquartile range (IQR): 16-45 U/L] and 22 U/L (IQR: 13-37 U /L), respectively, which were significantly higher than the median ALT (median: 23, IQR: 15-37) and AST (median: 20, IQR: 16-26) activities in the non-elevated STB group (both p < 0.05). Patients with an elevated STB level showed increased mortality [hazard ratio (HR): 9.45, P = 0.002], elevated conjugated bilirubin (CB) levels (HR: 4.38, P = 0.03), and an elevated ratio of CB to unconjugated bilirubin (UCB, CB/UCB) (HR: 2.49, P = 0.01). CB/UCB was positively correlated with disease severity (odds ratio: 2.21, P = 0.01). Conclusions: COVID-19 patients with elevated STB and CB levels had a higher mortality, and CB/UCB was predictive of disease severity and mortality. Thus, it is necessary to pay special attention to COVID-19 patients with elevated bilirubin levels in clinical management.

11.
Int J Med Sci ; 17(16): 2468-2476, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-827890

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was first announced in Wuhan, and has rapidly evolved into a pandemic. However, the risk factors associated with the severity and mortality of COVID-19 are yet to be described in detail. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the information of 1525 cases from the Leishenshan Hospital in Wuhan. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were generated to explore the relationship between procalcitonin (PCT) level and the progression and prognosis of COVID-19. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to explore the relationship between disease severity in hospitalized patients and their PCT levels. Survival curves and the cumulative hazard function for COVID-19 progression were conducted in the two groups. To further detect the relationship between the computed tomography score and survival days, curve-fitting analyses were performed. Results: Patients in the elevated PCT group had a higher incidence of severe and critical severity conditions (P < 0.001), death, and higher computed tomography (CT) scores. There was an association between elevated PCT levels and mortality in the univariate ((hazard ratio [1], 3.377; 95% confidence interval [2], 1.012-10.344; P = 0.033) and multivariate Cox regression analysis (HR, 4.933; 95% CI, 1.170-20.788; P = 0.030). Similarly, patients with elevated PCT were more likely to have critically severe disease conditions in the univariate (odds ratio [2], 7.247; 95% CI, 3.559-14.757; P < 0.001) and multivariate logistic regression analysis (OR, 10.679; 95% CI, 4.562-25.000; P < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier curves showed poorer prognosis for patients with elevated PCT (P = 0.024). The CT score 1 for patients with elevated PCT peaked at day 40 following the onset of symptoms then decreased gradually, while their total CT score was relatively stable. Conclusion: PCT level was shown as an independent risk factor of in-hospital mortality among COVID-19 patients. Compared with inpatients with normal PCT levels, inpatients with elevated PCT levels had a higher risk for overall mortality and critically severe disease. These findings may provide guidance for improving the prognosis of patients with critically severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Procalcitonin/blood , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Disease Progression , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
12.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-820

ABSTRACT

Background: Almost one million of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients were diagnosed in the world wide from December 2019 to now. Thousands of em

13.
Chest ; 158(3): 939-946, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-728480

ABSTRACT

Background: In December 2019, a novel coronavirus-associated pneumonia, now known as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), was first detected in Wuhan, China. To prevent the rapid spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and treat patients with mild symptoms, sports stadiums and convention centers were reconstructed into mobile hospitals. Research Question: It is unknown whether a mobile cabin hospital can provide a safe treatment site for patients with mild COVID-19 symptoms. Study Design and Methods: This study retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 421 patients with COVID-19 admitted to a mobile cabin hospital in Wuhan from February 9, 2020, to March 5, 2020. Clinical data comprised patient age, sex, clinical presentation, chest imaging, nucleic acid testing, length of hospitalization, and outcomes. Results: Of the patients who were discharged from the cabin hospital, 362 (86.0%) were categorized as recovered; 14.0% developed severe symptoms and were transferred to a designated hospital. The most common presenting symptoms were fever (60.6%) and cough (52.0%); 5.2% exhibited no obvious symptoms. High fever (> 39.0°C) was more common in severe cases than in recovered cases (18.6% vs 6.6%). The distribution of lung lesions was peripheral in 85.0% of patients, multifocal in 69.4%, and bilateral in 68.2%. The most common pattern was ground-glass opacity (67.7%), followed by patchy shadowing (49.2%). The incidence of patchy shadowing was higher in patients with severe disease (66.1%) than in those who recovered (31.8%, P < .0001). The median length of hospitalization was 17 days (interquartile range, 14-19 days), and the median time taken for positive real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction results to become negative in recovered patients was 8 days (interquartile range, 6-10 days). Interpretation: Mobile cabin hospitals provide a safe treatment site for patients with mild COVID-19 symptoms and offer an effective isolation area to prevent the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Mobile Health Units , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , DNA, Viral/analysis , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate/trends , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
14.
Front Pharmacol ; 11: 1093, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-698306

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine, has been reported to be associated with disease severity and mortality in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Yet, dynamic changes in IL-6 levels and their prognostic value as an indicator of lung injury in COVID-19 patients have not been fully elucidated. OBJECTIVE: To validate whether IL-6 levels are associated with disease severity and mortality and to investigate whether dynamic changes in IL-6 levels might be a predictive factor for lung injury in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: This retrospective, single-center study included 728 adult COVID-19 patients and used data extracted from electronic medical records for analyses. RESULTS: The mortality rate was higher in the elevated IL-6 group than in the normal IL-6 group (0.16 vs 5%). Cox proportional hazards and logistic regression analyses for survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 10.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-99.23; p = 0.042) and disease severity (adjusted odds ratio, 3.56; 95% CI, 2.06-6.19; p < 0.001) revealed similar trends. Curve-fitting analyses indicated that patient computed tomography (CT) scores peaked on days 22 and 24. An initial decline in IL-6 levels on day 16 was followed by resurgence to a peak, nearly in tandem with the CT scores. CONCLUSION: Increased IL-6 level may be an independent risk factor for disease severity and in-hospital mortality and dynamic IL-6 changes may serve as a potential predictor for lung injury in Chinese COVID-19 patients. These findings may guide future treatment of COVID-19 patients.

15.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 11: 478, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697904

ABSTRACT

Aims: This study aimed to investigate the clinical courses and outcomes of diabetes mellitus patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Wuhan. Methods: This study enrolled 1,880 consecutive patients with confirmed COVID-19 in Leishenshan Hospital. We collected and analyzed their data, including demographic data, history of comorbidity, clinical symptoms, laboratory tests, chest computed tomography (CT) images, treatment options, and survival. Results: The percentages of patients with diabetes among the severe and critical COVID-19 cases were higher than those among the mild or general cases (89.2%, 10.8 vs. 0%, p = 0.001). However, patients with and without diabetes showed no difference in the follow-up period (p = 0.993). The mortality rate in patients with or without diabetes was 2.9% (n = 4) and 1.1% (n = 9), respectively (p = 0.114). Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses and the Kaplan-Meier curves did not show any statistically significant differences between patients with and without diabetes (all p > 0.05). Conclusions: Our study results suggested that diabetes had no effect on the prognosis of COVID-19 patients but had a negative association with their clinical courses. These results may be useful for clinicians in the management of diabetic patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Diabetes Complications , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Chin. Trad. Herbal Drugs ; 9(51): 2283-2296, 20200512.
Article in Chinese | WHO COVID, ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-681504

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) treatment mechanism and active ingredients of Shufeng Jiedu Capsule by network pharmacology and molecular docking. Methods: TCMSP databases were used to search the chemical composition and target of Shufeng Jiedu Capsule, which was composed of Isatidis Radix, Polygonum cuspidatum, Forsythia suspensa, Phragmitis Rhizoma, Patrinia, Verbena officinalis, Bupleurum chinense, and Glycyrrhiza uralensis. The Swiss target prediction database was used to remove the target with possibility of 0. The corresponding targets of the disease were searched in the GeneCards and OMIM databases with the key words of "coronavirus", "pneumonia", "cough", and "fever". Through the UniProt databases to correct the name of the target point, take the intersection of Shufeng Jiedu Capsule and the disease target point, then use the software of Cytoscape 3.7.2 to build the network of traditional Chinese medicine-compound-target for visualization, through DAVID databases to carry out the GO function enrichment analysis and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis, predict the interaction mechanism of the target, and draw the column and bubble chart for visualization. The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) 3CL hydrolase was then docking with all compounds and the first five compounds with the least binding energy were selected for docking with angiotensin-converting enzyme II (ACE2). Results: The traditional Chinese medicine-compound-target compound target network contains eight kinds of traditional Chinese medicine-compound-target, 157 compounds and 260 corresponding targets. The key targets were PTGS2, ESR1, AR, etc. There were 393 items in GO functional enrichment analysis (P < 0.05), and 139 signaling pathways in KEGG pathway enrichment analysis. Molecular docking results showed that SARS-CoV-2 3CL hydrolase and ACE2 binding energy of the five core compounds, including 6-(3-oxoindolin-2-ylidene) indolo [2,1-b] quinazolin-12-one, bicuculline, physciondiglucoside, dihydroverticillatine, and licoisoflavanone, was smaller than that of recommended chemical drugs, and the binding energy to ACE2 was similar to that of the recommended chemical drug. Conclusion: The compounds in Shufeng Jiedu Capsule can regulate the signaling pathway of human cytomegalovirus infection, Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus infection, IL-17 signaling pathway, small cell lung cancer, etc. to treat COVID-19 by binding with SARS-CoV-2 3CL hydrolase and ACE2.

18.
Surgery ; 168(3): 398-403, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-650869

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to investigate clinical symptoms and epidemiologic features of emergency surgery patients infected with the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). More than 5 million people worldwide have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since December 2019 to the time of this publication. Thousands of emergency operations have been carried out since December 2019. To date, however, no literature has focused on the clinical symptoms of emergency surgery patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 164 emergency surgery patients with or without COVID-19 pneumonia in Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University in Wuhan, China, from January 1, 2020, to January 20, 2020. For this report, the final date of follow-up was February 5, 2020. The associated clinical, laboratory, epidemiologic, demographic, radiologic, and outcome data were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: Of the 164 emergency surgery patients, the median age was 41 years (interquartile range, 29-89), and 136 (82.9%) were women. The associated main clinical symptom included fever (93 [56.7%]),dry cough (56 [34.2%]), fatigue (86 [52.4%]), nausea (78 [47.6%]), and dizziness (77 [47%]). Of 54 emergency surgery patients infected with COVID-19, the median age was 46 years (interquartile range: 25-89), and 45 (83.3%) were women. The pathologic clinical symptoms investigated included fever (54 [100%]), fatigue (48 [88.9%]), nausea (52 [96.3%]), dizziness (46 [85.2%]), and dry cough (44 [81.5%]). The lymphopenia (0.37 × 109/L [interquartile range: 0.23-0.65]) and increased C-reactive protein (24.7 × 109/L [interquartile range: 13.57-38]) were observed. The preoperative fever and postoperative fever in emergency surgery patients with or without COVID-19 pneumonia were analyzed in this study. Of 54 emergency surgery patients with COVID-19, 15 (27.8%) showed preoperative fever, 54 (100%) had postoperative fever. Of 110 emergency surgery patients without COVID-19, 5 (4.5%) had preoperative fever, 31 (28.2%) patients had postoperative fever. In emergency surgery patients with COVID-19, the fever lasted more than 7 days, markedly exceeded the length of time non-COVID-19 patients experienced fever (approximately 3 days). Furthermore, 43 health care workers were exposed to emergency surgery patients with COVID-19 pneumonia and were infected with COVID-19 pneumonia. CONCLUSION: In our study, the clinical symptoms of emergency surgery patients infected with COVID-19 displayed marked differences from those reporting common COVID-19 pneumonia. In addition, the health care workers were suspected to have been exposed to a great risk when caring for emergency surgery patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. Management guidelines of emergency surgery patients are described in in this report.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Emergencies , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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