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1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323879

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic is a significant worldwide health crisis. Patients with malignancy are considered at substantially increased risk of infection and poor outcomes. Breast cancer patients with COVID-19 represent an urgent clinical need. This study aimed to identify clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients with COVID-19 and risks associated with anti-cancer treatment. Methods: : This multicenter retrospective cohort study included 45 breast cancer patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 at seven designated hospitals in Hubei, China. The medical records of breast cancer patients were collected from the records of 9559 COVID-19 patients from 13 th January, 2020 to 18 th March, 2020. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess risk factors for COVID-19 severity. Results: : Of 45 breast cancer patients with COVID-19, 33 (73.3%) developed non-severe COVID-19, while 12 (26.7%) developed severe COVID-19, of which 3 (6.7%) patients died. The median age was 62 years, and 3 (6.7%) patients had stage IV breast cancer. Most patients developed fever (37, 82.2%), and most had bilateral lung involvement on chest CT (36, 80.0%). Univariate analysis showed the age over 75 and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score were associated with COVID-19 disease severity ( P <0.05). Multivariate analysis showed patients received chemotherapy within 7 days had a significantly higher risk for severe COVID-19 (logistic regression model: RR=13.886, 95% CI 1.014-190.243, P =0.049;Cox proportional hazards model: HR=13.909, 95% CI 1.086-178.150, P =0.043), with more pronounced neutropenia and higher LDH, CRP and procalcitonin levels than patients else ( P <0.05). Conclusions: The severity of COVID-19 in breast cancer patients was associated with baseline factors of the age over 75 and ECOG score, but not with tumor characteristics. Chemotherapy within 7 days before symptom onset was a risk factor for severe COVID-19, reflected by neutropenia and elevated LDH, CRP and procalcitonin levels.

2.
Blood Res ; 56(3): 205-207, 2021 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380049
3.
Breast ; 59: 102-109, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283953

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is a significant worldwide health crisis. Breast cancer patients with COVID-19 are fragile and require particular clinical care. This study aimed to identify the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients with COVID-19 and the risks associated with anti-cancer treatment. METHODS: The medical records of breast cancer patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were collected among 9559 COVID-19 patients from seven designated hospitals from 13th January to 18th March 2020 in Hubei, China. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess risk factors for COVID-19 severity. RESULTS: Of the 45 breast cancer patients with COVID-19, 33 (73.3%) developed non-severe COVID-19, while 12 (26.7%) developed severe COVID-19, of which 3 (6.7%) patients died. The median age was 62 years, and 3 (6.7%) patients had stage IV breast cancer. Univariate analysis showed that age over 75 and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score were associated with COVID-19 disease severity (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that patients who received chemotherapy within 7 days had a significantly higher risk for severe COVID-19 (logistic regression model: RR = 13.886, 95% CI 1.014-190.243, P = 0.049; Cox proportional hazards model: HR = 13.909, 95% CI 1.086-178.150, P = 0.043), with more pronounced neutropenia and higher LDH, CRP and procalcitonin levels than other patients (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In our breast cancer cohort, the severity of COVID-19 could be associated with baseline factors such as age over 75 and ECOG scores. Chemotherapy within 7 days before symptom onset could be a risk factor for severe COVID-19, reflected by neutropenia and elevated LDH, CRP and procalcitonin levels.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/diagnosis , Neutropenia/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/mortality , C-Reactive Protein , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Middle Aged , Neutropenia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Procalcitonin/blood , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
4.
Clin Chim Acta ; 511: 291-297, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023490

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Repositivity of SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid in discharged COVID-19 patients was reported recently. However, the characteristics of repositive results are still not well understood, leading to a lack of effective monitoring strategies. METHODS: In the present study, a total of 59 COVID-19 patients were enrolled, and the characteristics of the repositive samples were analyzed. RESULTS: The repositive rate in this cohort was 15.79%. The N gene was the main target gene that was positive in the repositive results as well as in the last positive results of all patients. The median duration from diagnosis to the last positive test was 20 days (IQR, 16-31 days), and the longest duration was 40 days. Repositivity was only observed in IgM single- or both IgM- and IgG-positive patients, instead of IgG single-positive patients. CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant proportion of repositives in the recovered COVID-19 patients, and increasing the required number of negatives for consecutive nucleic acid tests may reduce the incidence of repositives. The recommended monitoring strategy for repositivity is monitoring the N gene in IgM-positive patients. This can ensure high sensitivity while reducing the time and cost of nucleic acid detection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/genetics , Immunoglobulin M/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/standards , Retrospective Studies
5.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 11: 525, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690147

ABSTRACT

Background: Diabetes correlates with poor prognosis in patients with COVID-19, but very few studies have evaluated whether impaired fasting glucose (IFG) is also a risk factor for the poor outcomes of patients with COVID-19. Here we aimed to examine the associations between IFG and diabetes at admission with risks of complications and mortality among patients with COVID-19. Methods: In this multicenter retrospective cohort study, we enrolled 312 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 from 5 hospitals in Wuhan from Jan 1 to Mar 17, 2020. Clinical information, laboratory findings, complications, treatment regimens, and mortality status were collected. The associations between hyperglycemia and diabetes status at admission with primary composite end-point events (including mechanical ventilation, admission to intensive care unit, or death) were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results: The median age of the patients was 57 years (interquartile range 38-66), and 172 (55%) were women. At the time of hospital admission, 84 (27%) had diabetes (and 36 were new-diagnosed), 62 (20%) had IFG, and 166 (53%) had normal fasting glucose (NFG) levels. Compared to patients with NFG, patients with IFG and diabetes developed more primary composite end-point events (9 [5%], 11 [18%], 26 [31%]), including receiving mechanical ventilation (5 [3%], 6 [10%], 21 [25%]), and death (4 [2%], 9 [15%], 20 [24%]). Multivariable Cox regression analyses showed diabetes was associated increased risks of primary composite end-point events (hazard ratio 3.53; 95% confidence interval 1.48-8.40) and mortality (6.25; 1.91-20.45), and IFG was associated with an increased risk of mortality (4.11; 1.15-14.74), after adjusting for age, sex, hospitals and comorbidities. Conclusion: IFG and diabetes at admission were associated with higher risks of adverse outcomes among patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Glucose/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Diabetes Complications/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology , Glucose Intolerance/complications , Hyperglycemia/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Fasting , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Glucose Intolerance/virology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperglycemia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate
6.
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