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1.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261437, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581743

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: At present, the focus of the fighting against COVID-19 in China is shifting to strictly prevent the entrance of cases from abroad and disease transmission. Therefore, it is extremely urgent to better understand the clinical features of imported cases from overseas countries, which is conductive to formulate the corresponding countermeasures. This study aimed to describe the clinical features of COVID-19 cases imported from Russia through the Suifenhe port, in order to identify baseline and clinical data associated with disease progression and present corresponding countermeasures. METHODS: All COVID-19 cases imported from Russia through the Suifenhe port were included in this retrospective study. According to the "Diagnosis and Treatment Protocol for Novel Coronavirus Pneumonia (seventh edition)", imported COVID-19 cases were divided into asymptomatic infection, mild, moderate, severe, and critical groups. Baseline and clinical data, including age, gender, comorbidities, disease severity, symptoms at onset, body temperature, white blood cell (WBC) count, lymphocyte (LYMPH) count, lymphocyte percentage (LYM%), C-reactive protein (CRP), oxygenation index (OI), and the use therapeutic modalities were obtained on admission, and then compared between groups. RESULTS: A total of 375 COVID-19 cases imported from Russia through Suifenhe port were included, of whom the asymptomatic infection, mild, moderate, severe, and critical groups accounted for 4.0%, 13.9%, 75.5%, 5.3%, and 1.3%, respectively. The majority of the imported COVID-19 cases were men (61.9%) with a median age of 38.72 years who had no comorbidity (87.7%). Nearly one-third of them (33.1%) were asymptomatic at onset, and common initial symptoms included fever (36.5%), cough (36.0%), pharyngeal discomfort (12.3%), expectoration (8.0%), and chest tightness (5.3%). In total, 180 (48%) and 4 (1.1%) enrolled imported cases received nasal tube oxygen inhalation therapy and high-flow oxygen absorption, respectively; the remaining patients did not undergo oxygen therapy. The values of age, body temperature, WBC, LYMPH, LYM%, CRP, and OI were 38.72 ± 10.50, 35.10 ± 7.92, 5.59 ± 1.97, 1.67 ± 0.68, 31.05 ± 10.22, 8.00 ± 14.75, and 389.03 ± 74.07, respectively. Gender, age, LYMPH, LYM%, symptoms at onset, cough, fever, other rare symptoms, and oxygen therapy showed significant differences between groups (P = 0.036, < 0.001, < 0.001, < 0.001, < 0.001, < 0.001, < 0.001, = 0.045, < 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with domestic confirmed patients, COVID-19 patients who arrived at China from Russia through the Suifenhe port had significantly different clinical features, and the differences in gender, age, LYMPH, LYM%, symptoms at onset, cough, fever, other rare symptoms, and oxygen therapy between groups were statistically significant. Therefore, detailed and comprehensive countermeasures were developed to manage and prevent another outbreak based on these clinical features.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Cough/virology , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Russia , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
2.
Ann Transl Med ; 9(18): 1446, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436465

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The rapid spread of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) poses a global health emergency, and cases entering China from Russia are quite diverse. This study explored and compared the clinical characteristics and outcomes of severe and critically ill COVID-19 patients from Russia with and without influenza A infection, treated in a northern Chinese hospital (Russia imported patients). METHODS: A total of 32 severe and critically ill Russia-imported COVID-19 patients treated in the Heilongjiang Imported Severe and Critical COVID-19 Treatment Center from April 6 to May 11, 2020 were included, including 8 cases (group A) with and 24 cases (group B) without influenza A infection. The clinical characteristics of each group were compared, including prolonged hospital stay, duration of oxygen therapy, time from onset to a negative SARS-CoV-2 qRT-PCR RNA (Tneg) result, and duration of bacterial infection. RESULTS: The results showed that blood group, PaO2/FiO2, prothrombin time (PT), prothrombin activity (PTA), computed tomography (CT) score, hospital stay, duration of oxygenation therapy, Tneg, and duration of bacterial infection were statistically different between the two groups (P<0.05). Multivariant regression analysis showed that the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, C-reactive protein (CRP), and influenza A infection were factors influencing hospital stay; SOFA score, CRP, and CT score were factors influencing the duration of oxygenation therapy; PaO2/FiO2, platelet count (PLT), and CRP were factors influencing Tneg; and gender, SOFA score, and influenza A infection were factors influencing the duration of bacterial infection. CONCLUSIONS: Influenza A infection is common in Russia-imported COVID-19 patients, which can prolong the hospital stay and duration of bacterial infection. Routinely screening and treating influenza A should be conducted early in such patients.

3.
Int J Antimicrob Agents ; 57(1): 106216, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065130

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are no effective therapies for patients with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: Forty-one patients with confirmed COVID-19 were enrolled in the study and divided into two groups: artemisinin-piperaquine (AP) (n = 23) and control (n = 18). The primary outcome were the time taken to reach undetectable levels of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the percentage of participants with undetectable SARS-CoV-2 on days 7, 10, 14, and 28. The computed tomography (CT) imaging changes within 10 days, corrected QT interval changes, adverse events, and abnormal laboratory parameters were the secondary outcomes. RESULTS: The mean time to reach undetectable viral RNA (mean ± standard deviation) was 10.6 ± 1.1 days (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.4-12.8) for the AP group and 19.3 ± 2.1 days (95% CI 15.1-23.5) for the control group. The percentages of patients with undetectable viral RNA on days 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 were 26.1%, 43.5%, 78.3%, 100%, and 100%, respectively, in the AP group and 5.6%, 16.7%, 44.4%, 55.6%, and 72.2%, respectively, in the control group. The CT imaging within 10 days post-treatment showed no significant between-group differences (P > 0.05). Both groups had mild adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with mild-to-moderate COVID-19, the time to reach undetectable SARS-CoV-2 was significantly shorter in the AP group than that in the control group. However, physicians should consider QT interval changes before using AP.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Artemisinins/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Quinolines/therapeutic use , Adult , Artemisinins/adverse effects , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Long QT Syndrome/chemically induced , Lung Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases/drug therapy , Lung Diseases/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Quinolines/adverse effects , RNA, Viral/blood , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Load
4.
Int J Antimicrob Agents ; 57(1): 106216, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065129

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are no effective therapies for patients with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: Forty-one patients with confirmed COVID-19 were enrolled in the study and divided into two groups: artemisinin-piperaquine (AP) (n = 23) and control (n = 18). The primary outcome were the time taken to reach undetectable levels of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the percentage of participants with undetectable SARS-CoV-2 on days 7, 10, 14, and 28. The computed tomography (CT) imaging changes within 10 days, corrected QT interval changes, adverse events, and abnormal laboratory parameters were the secondary outcomes. RESULTS: The mean time to reach undetectable viral RNA (mean ± standard deviation) was 10.6 ± 1.1 days (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.4-12.8) for the AP group and 19.3 ± 2.1 days (95% CI 15.1-23.5) for the control group. The percentages of patients with undetectable viral RNA on days 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 were 26.1%, 43.5%, 78.3%, 100%, and 100%, respectively, in the AP group and 5.6%, 16.7%, 44.4%, 55.6%, and 72.2%, respectively, in the control group. The CT imaging within 10 days post-treatment showed no significant between-group differences (P > 0.05). Both groups had mild adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with mild-to-moderate COVID-19, the time to reach undetectable SARS-CoV-2 was significantly shorter in the AP group than that in the control group. However, physicians should consider QT interval changes before using AP.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Artemisinins/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Quinolines/therapeutic use , Adult , Artemisinins/adverse effects , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Long QT Syndrome/chemically induced , Lung Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases/drug therapy , Lung Diseases/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Quinolines/adverse effects , RNA, Viral/blood , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Load
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