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1.
Aging Dis ; 13(3): 884-898, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1870135

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 emerged in Wuhan in December 2019 and soon became a worldwide pandemic. We collected and analyzed the data from 1077 patients with COVID-19 who were admitted to the west campus of Wuhan Union Hospital from January 16 to April 16, 2020. Sixty (5.6%) of the 1077 COVID-19 patients were diagnosed with acute kidney injury (AKI) during hospitalization, and 18 of them (30%) had AKI on chronic kidney disease (AKI/CKD). COVID-19 patients with AKI had a worse prognosis, with higher intensive care unit (ICU) admission (28.3%) and fatality (65%) rates than patients without AKI (3.4% and 10.7%, respectively). Among the COVID-19 patients, AKI was more likely to occur in male patients, the elderly, patients with more severe disease states and those with comorbidities (such as hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease (CHD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and CKD). COVID-19 patients with AKI were more likely to develop respiratory failure, gastrointestinal bleeding, acute liver injury, acute myocardial injury, heart failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), cerebrovascular accident, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) than those without AKI. Compared with patients without AKI, COVID-19 patients with AKI had lower platelet counts, lymphocyte counts, albumin levels and serum calcium levels but had elevated leukocyte counts, neutrophil counts and serum potassium levels. Inflammatory indicators, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and procalcitonin (PCT), were significantly higher in patients with AKI than in those without AKI. COVID-19 patients with AKI also exhibited a longer prothrombin time (PT), a longer activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and a higher D-dimer level than those without AKI. Survival analysis revealed that COVID-19 patients with AKI had a reduced survival rate compared with those without AKI. Furthermore, COVID-19 patients with AKI/CKD had a lower survival rate than those with AKI or CKD only. Multiple logistic regression indicated that the predictors of AKI in COVID-19 patients included complications, such as respiratory failure and acute myocardial injury, and higher creatinine and PCT levels during hospitalization.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-312672

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to summarize the existing literature on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in newborns to clarify the clinical features and outcomes of neonates with COVID-19. A systematic search was performed in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Wanfang Data, and VIP databases from January 1, 2019 to April 30, 2020. The references of relevant studies were also searched. A descriptive summary was organized by aspects of clinical presentations (symptoms, laboratory examinations, and imaging) and outcomes. We identified 14 studies reporting 18 newborns with COVID-19. The most common clinical manifestations were fever (62.5%), shortness of breath (50.0%), diarrhea/vomiting/feeding intolerance(43.8%), cough (37.5%), dyspnea (25.0%), and nasal congestion/runny nose/sneeze(25.0%). Atypical symptoms included jaundice and convulsion. Lymphocyte numbers decreased in 5 cases, and radiographic findings were likely to show pneumonia. All newborns recovered and discharged from the hospital, and there was no death. Conclusion: Clinical symptoms of neonatal SARS-CoV-2 infection are atypical, most of them are mild. Up to now, the prognosis of newborns is good, and there is no death. Intrauterine vertical transmission is possible, but confirmed evidence is still lacking. The Long-term follow-up of potential influences of SARS-CoV-2 infection on neonates need further exploration.

3.
International Journal of Infectious Diseases ; 94:78-80, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1409639

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has emerged since December 2019 in Wuhan city, and has quickly spread throughout China and other countries. To date, no specific treatment has been proven to be effective for SARS-CoV-2 infection. According to World Health Organization (WHO), management of coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) has mainly focused on infection prevention, case detection and monitoring, and supportive care. Given to the previous experience, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been proven to be an effective therapy in the treatment of respiratory failure or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). On the basis of similar principle, ECMO may be also an effective therapy in the treatment of severe COVID-19. In this study, we described and discussed the clinical outcomes of ECMO for ARDS patients, ECMO use for severe COVID-19 in China, the indications of ECMO use, and some important issues associated with ECMO.

4.
J Card Surg ; 36(10): 3554-3560, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320417

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenatio (ECMO) for rescue therapy of respiratory failure in critically ill coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients remains controversial. We aimed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of ECMO in the treatment of COVID-19 compared with conventional ventilation support. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, data were collected on extremely critical patients with COVID-19 from January 2020 to March 2020 in intensive care unit of a hospital in charge by national rescue team in Wuhan, China, the epicenter of pandemic. Patients were classified into the ECMO group and the conventional ventilation non-ECMO group. Clinical characteristics, technical characteristics, laboratory results, mortality, and complications of the two groups were analyzed. RESULTS: 88 patients with extremely critical COVID-19 were screened; 34 received ECMO support and 31 received conventional ventilation support. Both groups had comparable characteristics at baseline in terms of age, gender, and comorbidities. Before ECMO or conventional therapy, patients in the two groups had sever acute respiratory distress syndrome with a mean partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2 /FiO2 ) ratio of 69.6 and 75.4, respectively. At the time of reporting, patients in the ECMO had significantly lower in-hospital mortality compared with the control group (58.8 vs. 93.5%, p = .001). CONCLUSION: ECMO is shown to decrease the mortality of extremely critical ill COVID-19 patients compared with the conventional treatment. Although complications occurred frequently, ECMO could still be a rescue therapy for the treatment of COVID-19 during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Critical Illness , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 374, 2021 07 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297295

ABSTRACT

Suffering from COVID-19 and witnessing the suffering and deaths of patients with COVID-19 may place frontline healthcare workers (HCWs) at particularly high risk for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however, few data are available on the clinical characteristics of PTSD among frontline HCWs who survived COVID-19 ("surviving HCWs" hereafter). The present study examined the prevalence, correlates, and clinical symptoms of possible PTSD in surviving HCWs 6 months after the COVID-19 outbreak in China. A total of 291 surviving HCWs and 42 age- and gender-matched COVID-19-free frontline HCWs (control group) were recruited and administered the Chinese Essen Trauma Inventory, which was used to assess the presence of possible PTSD according to DSM-IV-TR criteria. Survivors' clinical data and characteristics of exposure to COVID-19 were collected via self-report questionnaires. Surviving HCWs had significantly higher rates of possible PTSD than controls (19.9% vs. 4.8%, P = 0.017). Correlates of PTSD in survivors were ICU admission (OR = 8.73, P = 0.003), >10 respiratory symptoms during the most symptomatic period of COVID-19 (OR = 3.08, P = 0.006), the residual symptom of dizziness (OR = 2.43, P = 0.013), the residual symptom of difficult breathing (OR = 2.23, P = 0.027), life in danger due to COVID-19 (OR = 16.59, P = 0.006), and exposure to other traumatic events (OR = 2.94, P = 0.035). Less commonly seen PTSD symptoms in survivors were having nightmares about the event (34.5%), suddenly feeling like they were living through the event suddenly (25.9%), being unable to remember an important part of the event (32.8%), and overalertness (31.0%). Nearly one-fifth of the surviving HCWs had possible PTSD 6 months after the COVID-19 outbreak. Mental health services for this vulnerable population should include periodic screening for PTSD, expanded social support, and, when necessary, psychotherapy and psychopharmacological treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , China/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Health Personnel , Humans , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
6.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(7): 9225-9242, 2021 03 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1170595

ABSTRACT

AIM: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been associated with increased mortality and morbidity from thromboembolism, especially venous thromboembolism. There are more limited data for systemic thromboembolism. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of systemic and venous thromboembolism as well as major bleeding and mortality in relation to underlying risk factors and the impact of anticoagulation use in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with COVID-19 admitted to Union Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei, China between January 08, 2020 and April 7, 2020 were enrolled in this retrospective study. Cox proportional hazard models were utilized to determine associated risk factors for clinical events, adjusting for the severity of COVID-19 infection, drug therapies, comorbidities, surgery, and use of antithrombotic drugs. There were 1125 patients (49.9% male; mean age 58 years (standard deviation, SD, 15 years)) with a mean follow-up of 21 (SD 13) days. Approximately 25 (30%) patients with thromboembolism also suffered bleeding events. Age was an independent risk factor for thromboembolism, bleeding events, and death (all p<0.05). After adjusting for the severity of COVID-19 infection, comorbidities, surgery, antiviral drugs, immunomodulators, Chinese herbs, and antithrombotic drugs, low lymphocyte counts (hazard ratio, HR, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03, 1.01-1.05, p=0.01) and surgery (HR 2.80, 1.08-7.29, p=0.03) independently predicted the risk for major bleeding, whereas liver dysfunction (HR 4.13, 1.30-13.1, p=0.02) was an independent risk factor for patients with both thromboembolism and bleeding events. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COVID-19 were at high risk for thromboembolic and bleeding events as well as mortality. The use of anticoagulants, especially parenteral anticoagulants, significantly reduced the risk for composite outcomes of thromboembolism, bleeding events, and death. The presence of AF was a contributor to systemic thromboembolism in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Thromboembolism/etiology , Adult , Aged , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , China/epidemiology , Female , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology
7.
Complement Ther Clin Pract ; 43: 101379, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163602

ABSTRACT

The epidemic situation of COVID-19 is a great public health emergency worldwide characterized by fastest spreading, widest infection range and the mostly difficult to prevent and control in recent years. According to medical experience, traditional Chinese exercises (TCE) have been applied for COVID-19 prevention, adjuvant treatment or rehabilitation, and achieved some curative effects. They can enhance the body immunity, improve the function of organs, especially cardiopulmonary function, promote physical and mental rehabilitation by adjusting the body, regulating the breath, regulating the mind. This paper aims to investigate the potential value of TCE for health preservation in the prevention and adjuvant treatment for COVID-19 according to an overview of application and analysis of existing evidence. On this basis, this review proposed the TCE plan by visiting clinical and practice experts, so as to provide some references for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 with TCE in the world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , China , Exercise , Exercise Therapy , Humans , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(7): 9243-9252, 2021 04 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168300

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has spread rapidly since 2019. Approximately 15% of the patients will develop severe complications such as multiple organ disease syndrome related to cytokine release syndrome (CRS). Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) can remove inflammatory cytokines through filtration or adsorption. We evaluated the effectiveness of CRRT in COVID-19 patients with CRS. METHODS: This retrospective, multicenter, descriptive study included 83 patients with CRS from three hospitals in Wuhan. RESULTS: In COVID-19 patients with CRS, the fatality rate was even higher in CRRT group (P=0.005). However, inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein, neutrophil counts, and D-dimer decreased after CRRT (P<0.05). Results of Lasso model showed that tracheotomy (ß -1.31) and convalescent plasma (ß -1.41) were the protective factors. In contrast, CRRT (ß 1.07), respiratory failure (ß 1.61), consolidation on lung CT (ß 0.48), acute kidney injury (AKI) (ß 0.47), and elevated neutrophil count (ß 0.02) were the risk factors for death. CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that although CRRT significantly reduced the inflammation, it did not decrease the fatality rate of patients with CRS. Therefore, the choice of CRRT indication, dialysis time and dialysis mode should be more careful and accurate in COVID-19 patients with CRS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Critical Illness/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , China , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Treatment Outcome
9.
Curr Stem Cell Res Ther ; 16(2): 105-108, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136354

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus, named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV- 2) has emerged in Wuhan, China since the end of December 2019 and has quickly spread all over the world in a matter of two months. To date, no specific treatment has been proven to be effective for coronavirus (COVID-19). With the rapid increase of infected patients and deaths, it is vital to explore an effective treatment for COVID-19. Current studies suggest that there exists cytokine storm in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients; some of the them will develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiple organ dysfunction, and even death. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess the property of immunomodulation. Given the previous preclinical and clinical studies, MSCs therapy has shown safety and efficacy in the treatment of respiratory failure or ARDS. Based on similar principles, MSCs therapy may also be an effective therapy in the treatment of COVID-19. In this study, we summarized the clinical outcomes of MSCs for ARDS patients in some preclinical and clinical studies and discussed the application of MSCs for patients with COVID-19 in China and the related important issues with MSCs used during the outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Pandemics
10.
Cell Transplant ; 30: 963689721995455, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1112412

ABSTRACT

During the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), many critically ill patients died of severe pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), or multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. To date, no specific treatments have been proven to be effective for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In the animal models and clinical applications, mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have been shown safety and efficacy for the treatment of respiratory virus infection through their abilities of differentiation and immunomodulation. Besides, possessing several advantages of MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) over MSCs, EV-based therapy also holds potential therapeutic effects in respiratory virus infection. In this review, we summarized the basic characteristics and mechanisms of COVID-19 and MSCs, outlined some preclinical and clinical studies of MSCs or MSC-EVs for respiratory virus infection such as influenza virus and SARS-CoV-2, shed light on the common problems that we should overcome to translate MSC therapy into clinical application, and discussed some safe issues related to the use of MSCs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Animals , Clinical Trials as Topic , Exosomes , Extracellular Vesicles , Humans , Patient Safety
11.
Natl Sci Rev ; 7(12): 1868-1878, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087785

ABSTRACT

Systematic autopsy and comprehensive pathological analyses of COVID-19 decedents should provide insights into the disease characteristics and facilitate the development of novel therapeutics. In this study, we report the autopsy findings from the lungs and lymphatic organs of 12 COVID-19 decedents-findings that evaluated histopathological changes, immune cell signature and inflammatory factor expression in the lungs, spleen and lymph nodes. Here we show that the major pulmonary alterations included diffuse alveolar damage, interstitial fibrosis and exudative inflammation featured with extensive serous and fibrin exudates, macrophage infiltration and abundant production of inflammatory factors (IL-6, IP-10, TNFα and IL-1ß). The spleen and hilar lymph nodes contained lesions with tissue structure disruption and immune cell dysregulation, including lymphopenia and macrophage accumulation. These findings provide pathological evidence that links injuries of the lungs and lymphatic organs with the fatal systematic respiratory and immune malfunction in critically ill COVID-19 patients.

12.
Stroke ; 51(9): e254-e258, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992145

ABSTRACT

Recent case-series of small size implied a pathophysiological association between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and severe large-vessel acute ischemic stroke. Given that severe strokes are typically associated with poor prognosis and can be very efficiently treated with recanalization techniques, confirmation of this putative association is urgently warranted in a large representative patient cohort to alert stroke clinicians, and inform pre- and in-hospital acute stroke patient pathways. We pooled all consecutive patients hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and acute ischemic stroke in 28 sites from 16 countries. To assess whether stroke severity and outcomes (assessed at discharge or at the latest assessment for those patients still hospitalized) in patients with acute ischemic stroke are different between patients with COVID-19 and non-COVID-19, we performed 1:1 propensity score matching analyses of our COVID-19 patients with non-COVID-19 patients registered in the Acute Stroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne Registry between 2003 and 2019. Between January 27, 2020, and May 19, 2020, 174 patients (median age 71.2 years; 37.9% females) with COVID-19 and acute ischemic stroke were hospitalized (median of 12 patients per site). The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was 10 (interquartile range [IQR], 4-18). In the 1:1 matched sample of 336 patients with COVID-19 and non-COVID-19, the median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was higher in patients with COVID-19 (10 [IQR, 4-18] versus 6 [IQR, 3-14]), P=0.03; (odds ratio, 1.69 [95% CI, 1.08-2.65] for higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score). There were 48 (27.6%) deaths, of which 22 were attributed to COVID-19 and 26 to stroke. Among 96 survivors with available information about disability status, 49 (51%) had severe disability at discharge. In the propensity score-matched population (n=330), patients with COVID-19 had higher risk for severe disability (median mRS 4 [IQR, 2-6] versus 2 [IQR, 1-4], P<0.001) and death (odds ratio, 4.3 [95% CI, 2.22-8.30]) compared with patients without COVID-19. Our findings suggest that COVID-19 associated ischemic strokes are more severe with worse functional outcome and higher mortality than non-COVID-19 ischemic strokes.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/complications , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Stroke/complications , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disability Evaluation , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Propensity Score , Recovery of Function , Registries , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/therapy , Survival Analysis , Time-to-Treatment , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
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