Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 12 de 12
Filter
3.
J Vasc Access ; : 1129729820937484, 2020 Jul 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-633922

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 is an epidemic disease throughout the world. The management of vascular access during the epidemic is currently unknown. METHODS: In this multicenter cross-sectional study, we collected vascular access data from hemodialysis patients treated at 44 hospitals in Hubei from 22 January to 10 March 2020. We estimated the management of vascular access during the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak. RESULTS: Of the 9231 hemodialysis patients included, 5387 patients (58.4%) were men and 2959 patients (32.1%) were older than 65 years. Arteriovenous fistula was the predominant type of vascular access, accounting for 76.5%; 496 patients (5.4%) developed vascular access complications; catheter flow reduction was the most common vascular access complication, and stenosis was the predominant complication among those with arteriovenous access. Overall, 280 vascular access sites were placed in patients newly diagnosed with uremia, of whom 260 (92.8%) underwent catheter insertion; 149 rescue procedures were carried out to treat the vascular access complications, which consisted of 132 catheters, 7 percutaneous transluminal angioplasties, 6 arteriovenous fistula repairs, and 4 arteriovenous fistulas. Occlusion of the arteriovenous access had the highest rescue rate (92.7%), while many other vascular access complications remained untreated; 69 and 142 patients were diagnosed with confirmed and suspected coronavirus disease 2019, respectively. A total of 146 patients died, of whom 29 patients (19.9%) died due to vascular access complications. CONCLUSION: Catheter flow reduction and stenosis of arteriovenous access were the major vascular access complications. Most of the vascular access sites established were catheters, and many of the vascular access complications remained untreated.

4.
J Clin Lab Anal ; : e23415, 2020 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-505885

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate clinical characteristics, laboratory indexes, treatment regimens, and short-term outcomes of severe and critical coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. METHODS: One hundred and sixty one consecutive severe and critical COVID-19 patients admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) were retrospectively reviewed in this multicenter study. Demographic features, medical histories, clinical symptoms, lung computerized tomography (CT) findings, and laboratory indexes on admission were collected. Post-admission complications, treatment regimens, and clinical outcomes were also documented. RESULTS: The mean age was 59.38 ± 16.54 years, with 104 (64.60%) males and 57 (35.40%) females. Hypertension (44 [27.33%]) and diabetes were the most common medical histories. Fever (127 [78.88%]) and dry cough (111 [68.94%]) were the most common symptoms. Blood routine indexes, hepatic and renal function indexes, and inflammation indexes were commonly abnormal. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was the most common post-admission complication (69 [42.86%]), followed by electrolyte disorders (48 [29.81%]), multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) (37 [22.98%]), and hypoproteinemia (36 [22.36%]). The most commonly used antiviral drug was lopinavir/ritonavir tablet. 50 (31.06%) patients died, while 78 (48.45%) patients healed and discharged, and the last 33 (20.50%) patients remained in hospital. Besides, the mean hospital stay of deaths was 21.66 ± 11.18 days, while the mean hospital stay of discharged patients was 18.42 ± 12.77 days. Furthermore, ARDS (P < .001) and MODS (P = .008) correlated with increased mortality rate. CONCLUSION: Severe and critical COVID-19 presents with high mortality rate, and occurrence of ARDS or MODS greatly increases its mortality risk.

5.
Cell ; 181(7): 1475-1488.e12, 2020 06 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-464128

ABSTRACT

Viruses are a constant threat to global health as highlighted by the current COVID-19 pandemic. Currently, lack of data underlying how the human host interacts with viruses, including the SARS-CoV-2 virus, limits effective therapeutic intervention. We introduce Viral-Track, a computational method that globally scans unmapped single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) data for the presence of viral RNA, enabling transcriptional cell sorting of infected versus bystander cells. We demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of Viral-Track to systematically detect viruses from multiple models of infection, including hepatitis B virus, in an unsupervised manner. Applying Viral-Track to bronchoalveloar-lavage samples from severe and mild COVID-19 patients reveals a dramatic impact of the virus on the immune system of severe patients compared to mild cases. Viral-Track detects an unexpected co-infection of the human metapneumovirus, present mainly in monocytes perturbed in type-I interferon (IFN)-signaling. Viral-Track provides a robust technology for dissecting the mechanisms of viral-infection and pathology.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Software , Animals , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coinfection/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Interferons/immunology , Lung/pathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Sensitivity and Specificity , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis
6.
Front Med ; 2020 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-401814

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a life-threatening pandemic. The epidemic trends in different countries vary considerably due to different policy-making and resources mobilization. We calculated basic reproduction number (R0) and the time-varying estimate of the effective reproductive number (Rt) of COVID-19 by using the maximum likelihood method and the sequential Bayesian method, respectively. European and North American countries possessed higher R0 and unsteady Rt fluctuations, whereas some heavily affected Asian countries showed relatively low R0 and declining Rt now. The numbers of patients in Africa and Latin America are still low, but the potential risk of huge outbreaks cannot be ignored. Three scenarios were then simulated, generating distinct outcomes by using SEIR (susceptible, exposed, infectious, and removed) model. First, evidence-based prompt responses yield lower transmission rate followed by decreasing Rt. Second, implementation of effective control policies at a relatively late stage, in spite of huge casualties at early phase, can still achieve containment and mitigation. Third, wisely taking advantage of the time-window for developing countries in Africa and Latin America to adopt adequate measures can save more people's life. Our mathematical modeling provides evidence for international communities to develop sound design of containment and mitigation policies for COVID-19.

7.
Nat Med ; 26(6): 842-844, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-244490

ABSTRACT

Respiratory immune characteristics associated with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity are currently unclear. We characterized bronchoalveolar lavage fluid immune cells from patients with varying severity of COVID-19 and from healthy people by using single-cell RNA sequencing. Proinflammatory monocyte-derived macrophages were abundant in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with severe COVID-9. Moderate cases were characterized by the presence of highly clonally expanded CD8+ T cells. This atlas of the bronchoalveolar immune microenvironment suggests potential mechanisms underlying pathogenesis and recovery in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Single-Cell Analysis , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology
8.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 31(6): 1157-1165, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-154772

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Some patients with COVID-19 pneumonia also present with kidney injury, and autopsy findings of patients who died from the illness sometimes show renal damage. However, little is known about the clinical characteristics of kidney-related complications, including hematuria, proteinuria, and AKI. METHODS: In this retrospective, single-center study in China, we analyzed data from electronic medical records of 333 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, including information about clinical, laboratory, radiologic, and other characteristics, as well as information about renal outcomes. RESULTS: We found that 251 of the 333 patients (75.4%) had abnormal urine dipstick tests or AKI. Of 198 patients with renal involvement for the median duration of 12 days, 118 (59.6%) experienced remission of pneumonia during this period, and 111 of 162 (68.5%) patients experienced remission of proteinuria. Among 35 patients who developed AKI (with AKI identified by criteria expanded somewhat beyond the 2012 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes definition), 16 (45.7%) experienced complete recovery of kidney function. We suspect that most AKI cases were intrinsic AKI. Patients with renal involvement had higher overall mortality compared with those without renal involvement (28 of 251 [11.2%] versus one of 82 [1.2%], respectively). Stepwise multivariate binary logistic regression analyses showed that severity of pneumonia was the risk factor most commonly associated with lower odds of proteinuric or hematuric remission and recovery from AKI. CONCLUSIONS: Renal abnormalities occurred in the majority of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. Although proteinuria, hematuria, and AKI often resolved in such patients within 3 weeks after the onset of symptoms, renal complications in COVID-19 were associated with higher mortality.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Hematuria/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Proteinuria/etiology , Adult , Aged , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies
9.
Front Med ; 14(2): 199-209, 2020 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-51748

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 was first reported in Wuhan in December 2019 and gradually spread to other areas in China. After implementation of prevention and control measures, the estimation of the epidemic trend is needed. A phase- and region-adjusted SEIR model was applied for modeling and predicting the number of cases in Wuhan, Hubei Province and regions outside Hubei Province in China. The estimated number of infections could reach its peak in late February 2020 in Wuhan and Hubei Province, which is 55 303-84 520 and 83 944-129 312, respectively, while the epidemic peaks in regions outside Hubei Province in China could appear on February 13, 2020 with the estimated 13 035-19 108 cases. According to the estimation, the outbreak would abate in March and April all over China. Current estimation provided evidence for planned work resumption under stringent prevention and control in China to further support the fight against the epidemic. Nevertheless, there is still possibility of the second outbreak brought by the work resumption and population migration, especially from Hubei Province and high intensity cities outside Hubei Province. Strict prevention and control measures still need to be considered in the regions with high intensity of epidemic and densely-populated cities.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Epidemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Statistics as Topic
11.
Kidney Int ; 97(5): 829-838, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-10390

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, a coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) disease outbreak occurred in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, and rapidly spread to other areas worldwide. Although diffuse alveolar damage and acute respiratory failure were the main features, the involvement of other organs needs to be explored. Since information on kidney disease in patients with COVID-19 is limited, we determined the prevalence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients with COVID-19. Further, we evaluated the association between markers of abnormal kidney function and death in patients with COVID-19. This was a prospective cohort study of 701 patients with COVID-19 admitted in a tertiary teaching hospital that also encompassed three affiliates following this major outbreak in Wuhan in 2020 of whom 113 (16.1%) died in hospital. Median age of the patients was 63 years (interquartile range, 50-71), including 367 men and 334 women. On admission, 43.9% of patients had proteinuria and 26.7% had hematuria. The prevalence of elevated serum creatinine, elevated blood urea nitrogen and estimated glomerular filtration under 60 ml/min/1.73m2 were 14.4, 13.1 and 13.1%, respectively. During the study period, AKI occurred in 5.1% patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that patients with kidney disease had a significantly higher risk for in-hospital death. Cox proportional hazard regression confirmed that elevated baseline serum creatinine (hazard ratio: 2.10, 95% confidence interval: 1.36-3.26), elevated baseline blood urea nitrogen (3.97, 2.57-6.14), AKI stage 1 (1.90, 0.76-4.76), stage 2 (3.51, 1.49-8.26), stage 3 (4.38, 2.31-8.31), proteinuria 1+ (1.80, 0.81-4.00), 2+∼3+ (4.84, 2.00-11.70), and hematuria 1+ (2.99, 1.39-6.42), 2+∼3+ (5.56,2.58- 12.01) were independent risk factors for in-hospital death after adjusting for age, sex, disease severity, comorbidity and leukocyte count. Thus, our findings show the prevalence of kidney disease on admission and the development of AKI during hospitalization in patients with COVID-19 is high and is associated with in-hospital mortality. Hence, clinicians should increase their awareness of kidney disease in patients with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , Coronavirus Infections , Hospital Mortality , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Acute Kidney Injury/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Betacoronavirus , China , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Proportional Hazards Models , Prospective Studies , Proteinuria , Risk Factors
12.
Cell Discov. ; 1(6)20201201.
Article in English | ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-1750

ABSTRACT

An outbreak of clusters of viral pneumonia due to a novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV/SARS-CoV-2) happened in Wuhan, Hubei Province in China in December 2019. Since the outbreak, several groups reported estimated R0of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and generated valuable prediction for the early phase of this outbreak. After implementation of strict prevention and control measures in China, new estimation is needed. An infectious disease dynamics SEIR (Susceptible, Exposed, Infectious, and Removed) model was applied to estimate the epidemic trend in Wuhan, China under two assumptions of Rt. In the first assumption, Rtwas assumed to maintain over 1. The estimated number of infections would continue to increase throughout February without any indication of dropping with Rt= 1.9, 2.6, or 3.1. The number of infections would reach 11,044, 70,258, and 227,989, respectively, by 29 February 2020. In the second assumption, Rtwas assumed to gradually decrease at different phases from high level of transmission (Rt= 3.1, 2.6, and 1.9) to below 1 (Rt= 0.9 or 0.5) owing to increasingly implemented public health intervention. Several phases were divided by the dates when various levels of prevention and control measures were taken in effect in Wuhan. The estimated number of infections would reach the peak in late February, which is 58,077–84,520 or 55,869–81,393. Whether or not the peak of the number of infections would occur in February 2020 may be an important index for evaluating the sufficiency of the current measures taken in China. Regardless of the occurrence of the peak, the currently strict measures in Wuhan should be continuously implemented and necessary strict public health measures should be applied in other locations in China with high number of COVID-19 cases, in order to reduce Rtto an ideal level and control the infection.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL