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1.
Adv Sci (Weinh) ; 10(15): e2206615, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2279406

ABSTRACT

The widespread accessibility of commercial/clinically-viable electrochemical diagnostic systems for rapid quantification of viral proteins demands translational/preclinical investigations. Here, Covid-Sense (CoVSense) antigen testing platform; an all-in-one electrochemical nano-immunosensor for sample-to-result, self-validated, and accurate quantification of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nucleocapsid (N)-proteins in clinical examinations is developed. The platform's sensing strips benefit from a highly-sensitive, nanostructured surface, created through the incorporation of carboxyl-functionalized graphene nanosheets, and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) conductive polymers, enhancing the overall conductivity of the system. The nanoengineered surface chemistry allows for compatible direct assembly of bioreceptor molecules. CoVSense offers an inexpensive (<$2 kit) and fast/digital response (<10 min), measured using a customized hand-held reader (<$25), enabling data-driven outbreak management. The sensor shows 95% clinical sensitivity and 100% specificity (Ct<25), and overall sensitivity of 91% for combined symptomatic/asymptomatic cohort with wildtype SARS-CoV-2 or B.1.1.7 variant (N = 105, nasal/throat samples). The sensor correlates the N-protein levels to viral load, detecting high Ct values of ≈35, with no sample preparation steps, while outperforming the commercial rapid antigen tests. The current translational technology fills the gap in the workflow of rapid, point-of-care, and accurate diagnosis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , COVID-19/diagnosis , Sensitivity and Specificity , Nucleocapsid , Antigens
4.
J Virol ; 97(2): e0194722, 2023 02 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2193457

ABSTRACT

Members of deltacoronavirus (DCoV) have mostly been identified in diverse avian species as natural reservoirs, though the porcine DCoV (PDCoV) is a major swine enteropathogenic virus with global spread. The important role of aminopeptidase N (APN) orthologues from various mammalian and avian species in PDCoV cellular entry and interspecies transmission has been revealed recently. In this study, comparative analysis indicated that three avian DCoVs, bulbul DCoV HKU11, munia DCoV HKU13, and sparrow DCoV HKU17 (Chinese strain), and PDCoV in the subgenera Buldecovirus are grouped together at whole-genome levels; however, the spike (S) glycoprotein and its S1 subunit of HKU17 are more closely related to night heron DCoV HKU19 in Herdecovirus. Nevertheless, the S1 protein of HKU11, HKU13, or HKU17 bound to or interacted with chicken APN (chAPN) or porcine APN (pAPN) by flow cytometry analysis of cell surface expression of APN and by coimmunoprecipitation in APN-overexpressing cells. Expression of chAPN or pAPN allowed entry of pseudotyped lentiviruses with the S proteins from HKU11, HKU13 and HKU17 into nonsusceptible cells and natural avian and porcine cells, which could be inhibited by the antibody against APN or anti-PDCoV-S1. APN knockdown by siRNA or knockout by CRISPR/Cas9 in chicken or swine cell lines significantly or almost completely blocked infection of these pseudoviruses. Hence, we demonstrate that HKU11, HKU13, and HKU17 with divergent S genes likely engage chAPN or pAPN to enter the cells, suggesting a potential interspecies transmission from wild birds to poultry and from birds to mammals by certain avian DCoVs. IMPORTANCE The receptor usage of avian deltacoronaviruses (DCoVs) has not been investigated thus far, though porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) has been shown to utilize aminopeptidase N (APN) as a cell receptor. We report here that chicken or porcine APN also mediates cellular entry by three avian DCoV (HKU11, HKU13, and HKU17) spike pseudoviruses, and the S1 subunit of three avian DCoVs binds to APN in vitro and in the surface of avian and porcine cells. The results fill the gaps in knowledge about the avian DCoV receptor and elucidate important insights for the monitoring and prevention of potential interspecies transmission of certain avian DCoVs. In view of the diversity of DCoVs, whether this coronavirus genus will cause novel virus to emerge in other mammals from birds, are worthy of further surveillance and investigation.


Subject(s)
CD13 Antigens , Deltacoronavirus , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Virus Internalization , Animals , CD13 Antigens/genetics , CD13 Antigens/metabolism , Chickens/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections , Deltacoronavirus/metabolism , Swine , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Lentivirus/genetics , Lentivirus/metabolism
5.
Virologica Sinica ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2093134

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has spread surprisingly fast worldwide, and new variants continue to emerge. Recently, the World Health Organization acknowledged a new mutant strain "Omicron", with children were accounting for a growing share of COVID-19 cases compared with other mutant strains. However, the clinical and immunological characteristics of convalescent pediatric patients after Omicron infection were lacking. In this study, we comparatively analyzed the clinical data from pediatric patients with adult patients or healthy children and the effects of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine on the clinical and immune characteristics in convalescent pediatric patients. Our results indicated that convalescent pediatric patients had unique clinical and immune characteristics different from those of adult patients or healthy children, and SARS-CoV-2 vaccination significantly affected on the clinical and immune characteristics and the prevention of nucleic acid re-detectable positive (RP) in convalescent patients. Our study further deepens the understanding of the impact of Omicron on the long-term health of pediatric patients and provides a valuable reference for the prevention and treatment of children infected with Omicron.

6.
J Virol ; 96(20): e0131822, 2022 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053123

ABSTRACT

Pseudorabies virus (PRV), which is extremely infectious and can infect numerous mammals, has a risk of spillover into humans. Virus-host interactions determine viral entry and spreading. Here, we showed that neuropilin-1 (NRP1) significantly potentiates PRV infection. Mechanistically, NRP1 promoted PRV attachment and entry, and enhanced cell-to-cell fusion mediated by viral glycoprotein B (gB), gD, gH, and gL. Furthermore, through in vitro coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays, NRP1 was found to physically interact with gB, gD, and gH, and these interactions were C-end Rule (CendR) motif independent, in contrast to currently known viruses. Remarkably, we illustrated that the viral protein gB promotes NRP1 degradation via a lysosome-dependent pathway. We further demonstrate that gB promotes NRP1 degradation in a furin-cleavage-dependent manner. Interestingly, in this study, we generated gB furin cleavage site (FCS)-knockout PRV (Δfurin PRV) and evaluated its pathogenesis; in vivo, we found that Δfurin PRV virulence was significantly attenuated in mice. Together, our findings demonstrated that NRP1 is an important host factor for PRV and that NRP1 may be a potential target for antiviral intervention. IMPORTANCE Recent studies have shown accelerated PRV cross-species spillover and that PRV poses a potential threat to humans. PRV infection in humans always manifests as a high fever, tonic-clonic seizures, and encephalitis. Therefore, understanding the interaction between PRV and host factors may contribute to the development of new antiviral strategies against PRV. NRP1 has been demonstrated to be a receptor for several viruses that harbor CendR, including SARS-CoV-2. However, the relationships between NRP1 and PRV are poorly understood. Here, we found that NRP1 significantly potentiated PRV infection by promoting PRV attachment and enhanced cell-to-cell fusion. For the first time, we demonstrated that gB promotes NRP1 degradation via a lysosome-dependent pathway. Last, in vivo, Δfurin PRV virulence was significantly attenuated in mice. Therefore, NRP1 is an important host factor for PRV, and NRP1 may be a potential target for antiviral drug development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Herpesvirus 1, Suid , Pseudorabies , Mice , Humans , Animals , Herpesvirus 1, Suid/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Furin/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Mammals
7.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 300, 2022 08 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031821

ABSTRACT

Ubiquitination is a highly conserved and fundamental posttranslational modification (PTM) in all eukaryotes regulating thousands of proteins. The RING (really interesting new gene) finger (RNF) protein, containing the RING domain, exerts E3 ubiquitin ligase that mediates the covalent attachment of ubiquitin (Ub) to target proteins. Multiple reviews have summarized the critical roles of the tripartite-motif (TRIM) protein family, a subgroup of RNF proteins, in various diseases, including cancer, inflammatory, infectious, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Except for TRIMs, since numerous studies over the past decades have delineated that other RNF proteins also exert widespread involvement in several diseases, their importance should not be underestimated. This review summarizes the potential contribution of dysregulated RNF proteins, except for TRIMs, to the pathogenesis of some diseases, including cancer, autoimmune diseases, and neurodegenerative disorder. Since viral infection is broadly involved in the induction and development of those diseases, this manuscript also highlights the regulatory roles of RNF proteins, excluding TRIMs, in the antiviral immune responses. In addition, we further discuss the potential intervention strategies targeting other RNF proteins for the prevention and therapeutics of those human diseases.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases , Humans , Neoplasms/genetics , Tripartite Motif Proteins/genetics , Tripartite Motif Proteins/metabolism , Ubiquitin/metabolism , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/genetics , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/metabolism , Ubiquitination/genetics
8.
J Biol Chem ; 298(11): 102511, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031421

ABSTRACT

Revealing the mechanisms of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) entry and cell-to-cell spread might provide insights for understanding the underlying mechanisms of viral pathogenesis, tropism, and virulence. The signaling pathways involved in SARS-CoV-2 entry and viral spike-mediated cell-to-cell fusion remain elusive. In the current study, we found that macropinocytosis inhibitors significantly suppressed SARS-CoV-2 infection at both the entry and viral spike-mediated cell-to-cell fusion steps. We demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 entry required the small GTPase Rac1 and its effector kinase p21-activated kinase 1 by dominant-negative and RNAi assays in human embryonic kidney 293T-angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 cells and that the serine protease transmembrane serine protease 2 reversed the decrease in SARS-CoV-2 entry caused by the macropinocytosis inhibitors. Moreover, in the cell-to-cell fusion assay, we confirmed that macropinocytosis inhibitors significantly decreased viral spike-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. Overall, we provided evidence that SARS-CoV-2 utilizes a macropinocytosis pathway to enter target cells and to efficiently promote viral spike-mediated cell-to-cell fusion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Cell Fusion , Virus Internalization , Serine Proteases
9.
Sustainability ; 14(16):10413, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024163

ABSTRACT

Based on the logistic growth model, the relationship between technology innovation and the evolution of economic forms was analyzed, and the main characteristics and basic laws of the five economic forms of hunter–gatherer, agriculture, industry, information, and bioeconomy were summarized. Based on a comprehensive and intensive scan of the latest bioeconomy development strategies of various countries, we summarized their two main driving forces from the technological supply side and economic and social demand side, as well as their four distinctive features, namely the comprehensiveness of science and technology innovation, the aggregation of industrial development, the globalization of development goals, and strong policy dependence. Finally, we proposed countermeasures to design the implementation path of the bioeconomy and improve the quality of the bioeconomy factor supply in terms of the development and application of biotechnology, the upgradation of bioindustry clusters, the positive policy environment, and the theorization of the bioeconomy.

10.
J Med Virol ; 94(11): 5096-5102, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1929925

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), since its outbreak in December 2019, has been capable of continuing the pandemic by mutating itself into different variants. Mass vaccinations, antibiotic treatment therapy, herd immunity, and preventive measures have reduced the disease's severity from the emerging variants. However, the virus is undergoing recombination among the current two variants: Delta and Omicron, resulting in a new variant, informally known as "Deltacron," which was controversial as it might be a product of lab contamination between Omicron and Delta samples. However, the proclamation was proved wrong, and the experts are putting more effort into better understanding the variant's epidemiological characteristics to control potential outbreaks. This review has discussed the potential mutations in the novel variant and prospective risk factors and therapeutic options in the context of this new variant. This study could be used as a guide for implementing appropriate controls in a sudden outbreak of this new variant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
11.
Biosens Bioelectron ; 213: 114459, 2022 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1885634

ABSTRACT

Electrochemical immuno-biosensors are one of the most promising approaches for accurate, rapid, and quantitative detection of protein biomarkers. The two-working electrode strip is employed for creating a self-supporting system, as a tool for self-validating the acquired results for added reliability. However, the realization of multiplex electrochemical point-of-care testing (ME-POCT) requires advancement in portable, rapid reading, easy-to-use, and low-cost multichannel potentiostat readers. The combined multiplex biosensor strips and multichannel readers allow for suppressing the possible complex matrix effect or ultra-sensitive detection of different protein biomarkers. Herein, a handheld binary-sensing (BiSense) bi-potentiostat was developed to perform electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)-based signal acquisition from a custom-designed dual-working-electrode immuno-biosensor. BiSense employs a commercially available microcontroller and out-of-shelf components, offering the cheapest yet accurate and reliable time-domain impedance analyzer. A specific electrical board design was developed and customized for impedance signal analysis of SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid (N)-protein biosensor in spiked samples and alpha variant clinical nasopharyngeal (NP) swab samples. BiSense showed limit-of-detection (LoD) down to 56 fg/mL for working electrode 1 (WE1) and 68 fg/mL for WE2 and reported with a dynamic detection range of 1 pg/mL to 10 ng/mL for detection of N-protein in spiked samples. The dual biosensing of N-protein in this work was used as a self-validation of the biosensor. The low-cost (∼USD$40) BiSense bi-potentiostat combined with the immuno-biosensors successfully detected COVID-19 infected patients in less than 10 min, with the BiSense reading period shorter than 1.5 min, demonstrating its potential for the realization of ME-POCTs for rapid and hand-held diagnosis of infections.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques , COVID-19 , Biosensing Techniques/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Electrochemical Techniques , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Pediatr Surg Int ; 38(8): 1113-1123, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1877828

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate the impact of COVID-19 on the treatment of children with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). METHODS: We retrospectively collected and compared the data of patients with CDH admitted between January 1, 2020 and December 31, 2021(study group) with the CDH patients admitted before the pandemic between January 1, 2018 and December 31, 2019 (control group). RESULTS: During the pandemic, 41 patients with CDH diagnosed prenatally were transferred to our hospital, and 40 underwent surgical repair. The number of patients treated in our hospital increased by 24.2% compared with the 33 patients before the pandemic. During the pandemic, the overall survival rate, postoperative survival rate and recurrence rate were 85.4%, 87.5% and 7.3%, respectively, and there were no significant differences compared with the control group (75.8%, 83.3% and 9.1%, respectively). The average length of hospital stay in patients admitted during the pandemic was longer than that in the control group (31 days vs. 16 days, P < 0.001), and the incidence of nosocomial infection was higher than that in the control group (19.5% vs. 3%, P = 0.037). CONCLUSIONS: CDH patients confirmed to be SARS-CoV-2 infection-free can receive routine treatment. Our data indicate that the implementation of protective measures during the COVID-19 pandemic, along with appropriate screening and case evaluation, do not have a negative impact on the prognosis of children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hernias, Diaphragmatic, Congenital , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Hernias, Diaphragmatic, Congenital/epidemiology , Hernias, Diaphragmatic, Congenital/surgery , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Med Virol ; 94(5): 1825-1832, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1777580

ABSTRACT

Currently, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread worldwide as an Omicron variant. This variant is a heavily mutated virus and designated as a variant of concern by the World Health Organization (WHO). WHO cautioned that the Omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2 held a very high risk of infection, reigniting anxieties about the economy's recovery from the 2-year pandemic. The extensively mutated Omicron variant is likely to spread internationally, posing a high risk of infection surges with serious repercussions in some areas. According to preliminary data, the Omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2 has a higher risk of reinfection. On the other hand, whether the current COVID-19 vaccines could effectively resist the new strain is still under investigation. However, there is very limited information on the current situation of the Omicron variant, such as genomics, transmissibility, efficacy of vaccines, treatment, and management. This review focused on the genomics, transmission, and effectiveness of vaccines against the Omicron variant, which will be helpful for further investigation of a new variant of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Genomics , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
15.
J Med Virol ; 94(5): 1815-1820, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1777571

ABSTRACT

The polybasic furin cleavage site insertion with four amino acid motifs (PRRA) in spike protein's S1/S2 junction site is important in determining viral infectivity, transmission, and host range. However, there is no review so far explaining the effect of the furin cleavage site of the spike protein on SARS-CoV-2 replication and pathogenesis in the host and immune responses and vaccination. Therefore, here we specifically focused on genomic evolution and properties of the cleavage site of spike protein in the context of SARS-CoV-2 followed by its effect on viral entry, replication, and pathogenesis. We also explored whether the spike protein furin cleavage site affected the host immune responses and SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. This review will help to provide novel insights into the effects of polybasic furin cleavage site on the current COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Furin/metabolism , Humans , Immunity , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vaccination
16.
World J Clin Cases ; 10(8): 2404-2419, 2022 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771816

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Millions of people have died of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, and retrospective studies of the disease in local regions are necessary. AIM: To characterize the epidemiological features and dynamic changes in blood biochemical indices for SARS-CoV-2-infected patients in Hebi, a representative city with a large floating population in North China. METHODS: From January 25 to February 10, 2020, the clinical data of patients who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in Hebi city (China) were evaluated at admission, and laboratory data for hematologic parameters, inflammatory indices, coagulation function indices, liver function indices, blood lipid indices, renal function indices, myocardial enzyme activities and five blood biochemical markers of immunity were evaluated at admission, upon hospitalization and before discharge. RESULTS: Sixteen confirmed COVID-19 patients developed pneumonia but were cured after adequate treatment. Fever and fatigue were the common symptoms. The most common laboratory abnormalities of patients at admission were leukopenia, eosinopenia, decreased percentage of eosinophils, elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein and fibrinogen levels, hypoalbuminemia, mildly increased aspartate transferase activity and levels of bilirubin, and increased levels of ß2-microglobulin. Importantly, aggravated liver dysfunction was detected in most patients, which may be partially attributed to virus infection as well as medicinal treatment. CONCLUSION: This study provides several potential diagnostic markers and dynamic biochemical indices of disease progression to better prevent, diagnose and treat COVID-19 infection.

17.
J Virol ; 96(7): e0013622, 2022 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745828

ABSTRACT

Viruses have evolved diverse strategies to hijack the cellular gene expression system for their replication. The poly(A) binding proteins (PABPs), a family of critical gene expression factors, are viruses' common targets. PABPs act not only as a translation factor but also as a key factor of mRNA metabolism. During viral infections, the activities of PABPs are manipulated by various viruses, subverting the host translation machinery or evading the cellular antiviral defense mechanism. Viruses harness PABPs by modifying their stability, complex formation with other translation initiation factors, or subcellular localization to promote viral mRNAs translation while shutting off or competing with host protein synthesis. For the past decade, many studies have demonstrated the PABPs' roles during viral infection. This review summarizes a comprehensive perspective of PABPs' roles during viral infection and how viruses evade host antiviral defense through the manipulations of PABPs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Host Microbial Interactions , Immune Evasion , SARS-CoV-2 , Antiviral Agents , Humans , Poly(A)-Binding Proteins/genetics , Poly(A)-Binding Proteins/immunology , Protein Biosynthesis , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
18.
J Med Virol ; 94(7): 2962-2968, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739192

ABSTRACT

Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases that play a key role in cell division and transcriptional regulation. Recent studies have demonstrated the critical roles of CDKs in various viral infections. However, the molecular processes underpinning CDKs' roles in viral infection and host antiviral defense are unknown. This minireview briefly overviews CDKs' functions and highlights the most recent discoveries of CDKs' emerging roles during viral infections, thereby providing a scientific and theoretical foundation for antiviral regulation and shedding light on developing novel drug targets and therapeutic strategies against viral infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Virus Diseases , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Cyclin-Dependent Kinases/metabolism , Cyclin-Dependent Kinases/therapeutic use , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Diseases/drug therapy
19.
J Med Virol ; 94(7): 2977-2985, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1729157

ABSTRACT

The pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is currently the most formidable challenge to humankind. Understanding the complicated virus-host interplay is crucial for fighting against viral infection. A growing number of studies point to the critical roles of RING (really interesting new gene) finger (RNF) proteins during SARS-CoV-2 infection. RNF proteins exert direct antiviral activity by targeting genome and envelope glycoproteins of SARS-CoV-2. Additionally, some RNF members serve as potent regulators for antiviral innate immunity and antibody-dependent neutralization of SARS-CoV-2. Notably, SARS-CoV-2 also hijacks the RNF proteins-mediated ubiquitination process to evade host antiviral innate immunity and enhance viral replication. In this mini-review, we discuss the diverse antiviral mechanisms of RNF proteins and viral immune evasion in an RNF proteins-dependent manner. Understanding the crosstalk between RNF proteins and SARS-CoV-2 infection would help design potential novel targets for COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Drug Treatment , SARS-CoV-2 , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Pandemics
20.
researchsquare; 2022.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-RESEARCHSQUARE | ID: ppzbmed-10.21203.rs.3.rs-1423306.v1

ABSTRACT

Purpose To investigate the impact of COVID-19 on the treatment of children with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH).Methods We retrospectively collected and compared the data of patients with CDH admitted between January 1, 2020 and December 31, 2021 with the CDH patients admitted before the pandemic between January 1, 2018 and December 31, 2019 (control group).Results During the pandemic, 41 patients with CDH diagnosed prenatally were transferred to our hospital, and 40 underwent surgical repair. The number of patients treated in our hospital increased by 24.2% compared with that before the pandemic. During the pandemic, the overall survival rate, postoperative survival rate and recurrence rate were 85.4%, 87.5% and 7.3%, respectively, and there were no significant differences compared with the control group. The average length of hospital stay in patients admitted during the pandemic was longer than that in the control group, and the incidence of nosocomial infection was higher than that in the control group.Conclusions CDH patients confirmed to be SARS-CoV-2 infection-free can receive routine treatment. Our data indicate that the implementation of protective measures during the COVID-19 pandemic, along with appropriate screening and case evaluation, do not have a negative impact on the prognosis of children.

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