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1.
BMJ Open ; 11(8), 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1843224

ABSTRACT

ObjectivesTo determine the association of general practitioner (GP) contact with depressive symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown in China.DesignIn April 2020, a follow-up survey was conducted on the basis of a baseline survey conducted between October 2018 and May 2019.SettingThe survey was embedded in the Stanford Wellness Living Laboratory-China (WELL China) study, an ongoing prospective community-based cohort study during 2018–2019.ParticipantsThe survey was conducted by telephone interview among 4144 adult urban residents participating in the WELL China study at baseline. We collected information on sociodemographic characteristics, depressive symptoms and GP contact during the lockdown period (February to March 2020).Primary and secondary outcome measuresDepressive symptoms were measured using the WHO-Five Well-being Index, comprising five questionnaire items that briefly indicate psychological well-being. Logistic regression models were applied to assess the association between GP contact and depressive symptoms.ResultsIn total, 3356 participants responded to the survey;203 were excluded owing to missing data on depressive symptoms, leaving 3153 participants in the present study. During lockdown, 449 participants had GP contact. GP contact was significantly negatively associated with prevalent depressive symptoms (OR, 0.67;95% CI 0.51 to 0.89;p<0.01) and incident depressive symptoms (OR 0.68;95% CI 0.51 to 0.93;p<0.05). Stratified analysis showed a significant negative association between depressive symptoms and GP contact in individuals who were 45–64 years old (p<0.01), had a middle or high education (p<0.01) and had self-reported non-communicable diseases (p<0.05).ConclusionsContact with GPs during the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdowns may have a negative association with depressive symptoms in community-dwelling populations. Given the possibility of further surges in COVID-19 infections, GPs’ contact in the community should be enhanced.

2.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 790422, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789351

ABSTRACT

Patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection mainly present with respiratory issues and related symptoms, in addition to significantly affected digestive system, especially the intestinal tract. While several studies have shown changes in the intestinal flora of patients with COVID-19, not much information is available on the gut virome of such patients. In this study, we used the viromescan software on the latest gut virome database to analyze the intestinal DNA virome composition of 15 patients with COVID-19 and investigated the characteristic alternations, particularly of the intestinal DNA virome to further explore the influence of COVID-19 on the human gut. The DNA viruses in the gut of patients with COVID-19 were mainly crAss-like phages (35.48%), Myoviridae (20.91%), and Siphoviridae (20.43%) family of viruses. Compared with healthy controls, the gut virome composition of patients with COVID-19 changed significantly, especially the crAss-like phages family, from the first time of hospital admission. A potential correlation is also indicated between the change in virome and bacteriome (like Tectiviridae and Bacteroidaceae). The abundance of the viral and bacterial population was also analyzed through continuous sample collection from the gut of patients hospitalized due to COVID-19. The gut virome is indeed affected by the SARS-CoV-2 infection, and along with gut bacteriome, it may play an important role in the disease progression of COVID-19. These conclusions would be helpful in understanding the gut-related response and contribute to the treatment and prevention strategies of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , DNA , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Virome
3.
Int J Disaster Risk Reduct ; 74: 102928, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763752

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has burdened and threatened the psychological health of people around the world, especially those of front-line medical staff. This study aimed to explore the mental-health status and its associated factors amongst the medical workforce of Xinjiang province under the normalisation of the COVID-19 epidemic prevention and control. Methods: A total of 408 medical staff were recruited from February 20 to March 10, 2021. Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90) scale, Social support Scale, and Simplified Coping-Style Questionnaire were applied to assess their mental-health status and stress-coping tendency. Descriptive analyses, welch's T-test, chi-square test, and binary logistic regression were used to analyse the data. Results: The prevalence of mental-health problems was 20.25% (80/395) amongst the surveyed medical staff, and their total symptom mean score (1.31 ± 0.40) was lower than that of the general population (1.44 ± 0.43). Logistic regression analysis revealed that nurse, individual with poor health condition, those who lived with their elderly parents at home, those receiving less social support, and those with a negative stress-coping style were more likely to show psychological problems. Conclusion: More attention should be paid to the mental state of the medical workforce during the COVID-19 pandemic. The government and professional institutes should facilitate social supportive activities and essential counselling services to help strengthen the psychological resilience of medical staff. Additionally, it is necessary for health administration committee and hospitals to make COVID-19 prevention practice guides and risk communication principles for improving the mental health of the front-line medical staff.

4.
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol ; 35(2): 223-228, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731435

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine prevalence and correlates of insomnia symptoms in older Chinese adults (OCAs) during the COVID-19 outbreak. BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, insomnia is a major health concern of elderly individuals, but its subtypes have not been investigated. METHODS: Altogether, 590 OCAs (50+ years) were recruited via snowball sampling during the COVID-19 outbreak. Standardized self-report questions were used to assess the presence of difficulty initiating sleep (DIS), difficulty maintaining sleep (DMS), and early morning awakening (EMA). Classification tree analysis (CTA) was used to identify correlates of insomnia. RESULTS: The one-month prevalence (95% confidence interval) of any subtype of insomnia symptoms was 23.4% (20.0-26.8%), with DIS, DMS, and EMA being 15.4% (12.5-18.3%), 17.1% (14.1-20.2%), and 11.2% (8.64-13.7%), respectively. Worry about being infected with COVID-19 emerged as the most salient correlate of insomnia (P < .001); compared to participants who were not worried about being infected, those who were worried and very worried were 3.2-fold (24.3% vs 7.5%) and 5.5-fold (24.3% vs 7.5%) more likely to have insomnia, respectively. Among participants in the "very worried" branch, those residing in Wuhan were 1.8-fold more likely to have insomnia than those residing in other places (50.0% vs 27.5%, P = .011). Among participants in the "worried" branch, unemployed persons were 2.0-fold more likely to have insomnia than employed persons (37.0% vs 18.1%, P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia symptoms were prevalent among OCAs during the COVID-19 outbreak. Selective intervention programs targeting elderly individuals who are worried about being infected, living in the epicenter of COVID-19, and unemployed might be effective.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology
5.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-327770

ABSTRACT

A booster vaccination is called for constraining the evolving epidemic of SARS-CoV-2. However, the necessity of a new COVID-19 vaccine is currently unclear. To compare the effect of an Omicron-matched S DNA vaccine and an ancestral S DNA vaccine in boosting cross-reactive immunities, we firstly immunized mice with two-dose of a DNA vaccine encoding the spike protein of the ancestral Wuhan strain. Then the mice were boosted with DNA vaccines encoding spike proteins of either the Wuhan strain or the Omicron variant. Specific antibody and T cell responses were measured at 4 weeks post boost. Our data showed that the Omicron-matched vaccine efficiently boosted RBD binding antibody and neutralizing antibody responses against both the Delta and the Omicron variants. Of note, antibody responses against the Omicron variant elicited by the Omicron-matched vaccine were much stronger than those induced by the ancestral S DNA vaccine. Meanwhile, CD8+ T cell responses against both the ancestral Wuhan strain and the Omicron strain also tended to be higher in mice boosted by the Omicron-matched vaccine than those in mice boosted with the ancestral S DNA vaccine, albeit no significant difference was observed. Our findings suggest that an Omicron-matched vaccine is preferred for boosting cross-reactive immunities.

6.
Preprint in English | bioRxiv | ID: ppbiorxiv-481110

ABSTRACT

A booster vaccination is called for constraining the evolving epidemic of SARS-CoV-2. However, the necessity of a new COVID-19 vaccine is currently unclear. To compare the effect of an Omicron-matched S DNA vaccine and an ancestral S DNA vaccine in boosting cross-reactive immunities, we firstly immunized mice with two-dose of a DNA vaccine encoding the spike protein of the ancestral Wuhan strain. Then the mice were boosted with DNA vaccines encoding spike proteins of either the Wuhan strain or the Omicron variant. Specific antibody and T cell responses were measured at 4 weeks post boost. Our data showed that the Omicron-matched vaccine efficiently boosted RBD binding antibody and neutralizing antibody responses against both the Delta and the Omicron variants. Of note, antibody responses against the Omicron variant elicited by the Omicron-matched vaccine were much stronger than those induced by the ancestral S DNA vaccine. Meanwhile, CD8+ T cell responses against both the ancestral Wuhan strain and the Omicron strain also tended to be higher in mice boosted by the Omicron-matched vaccine than those in mice boosted with the ancestral S DNA vaccine, albeit no significant difference was observed. Our findings suggest that an Omicron-matched vaccine is preferred for boosting cross-reactive immunities.

7.
Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology ; 11, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1564449

ABSTRACT

Patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection mainly present with respiratory issues and related symptoms, in addition to significantly affected digestive system, especially the intestinal tract. While several studies have shown changes in the intestinal flora of patients with COVID-19, not much information is available on the gut virome of such patients. In this study, we used the viromescan software on the latest gut virome database to analyze the intestinal DNA virome composition of 15 patients with COVID-19 and investigated the characteristic alternations, particularly of the intestinal DNA virome to further explore the influence of COVID-19 on the human gut. The DNA viruses in the gut of patients with COVID-19 were mainly crAss-like phages (35.48%), Myoviridae (20.91%), and Siphoviridae (20.43%) family of viruses. Compared with healthy controls, the gut virome composition of patients with COVID-19 changed significantly, especially the crAss-like phages family, from the first time of hospital admission. A potential correlation is also indicated between the change in virome and bacteriome (like Tectiviridae and Bacteroidaceae). The abundance of the viral and bacterial population was also analyzed through continuous sample collection from the gut of patients hospitalized due to COVID-19. The gut virome is indeed affected by the SARS-CoV-2 infection, and along with gut bacteriome, it may play an important role in the disease progression of COVID-19. These conclusions would be helpful in understanding the gut-related response and contribute to the treatment and prevention strategies of COVID-19.

8.
Pain Res Manag ; 2021: 9856174, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369443
9.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 290, 2021 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232067

ABSTRACT

Understanding the psychiatric symptoms of COVID-19 could facilitate the clinical management of COVID-19 patients. However, the profile of psychiatric symptoms among COVID-19 patients has been understudied. We performed a meta-analysis of studies assessing psychiatric symptoms of COVID-19 and SARS patients and survivors by using the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), an instrument covering a wide spectrum of psychiatric symptoms. Studies reporting SCL-90-R subscale scores among patients with and survivors of COVID-19 and SARS were retrieved from major English and Chinese literature databases. Patients' pooled SCL-90-R subscale scores were compared to the Chinese normative SCL-90-R data, and Cohen's d values were calculated to indicate the severity of psychiatric symptoms. The Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Checklist for Studies Reporting Prevalence Data was used to assess the quality of the included studies. The search yielded 25 Chinese studies with 1675 acute COVID-19 and 964 acute SARS patients, 30 COVID-19 and 552 SARS survivors during very early recovery (up to 1 month since discharge), 291 SARS survivors during early recovery (1-6 months after discharge), and 48 SARS survivors during late recovery (12 months after discharge). None of the included studies were rated as good quality. The ten SCL-90-R-defined psychiatric symptoms, which were of medium-to-severe severity (d = 0.68-3.01), were all exhibited in acute COVID-19 patients, and the severity of these symptoms decreased to mild-to-medium during very early recovery (d = 0.17-0.73). SARS patients presented eight psychiatric symptoms with mild-to-severe severity during the acute stage (d =0.43-1.88), and thereafter, the severity of symptoms decreased over the follow-up period. However, somatization (d = 0.30) and anxiety (d = 0.28) remained at mild levels during late recovery. A wide variety of severe psychiatric symptoms have been reported by acute COVID-19 patients, and these symptoms, despite decreasing in severity, persist in very early recovery. The changing trajectory observed with SARS suggests that psychiatric symptoms of COVID-19 may persist for a long time after discharge, and therefore, periodic monitoring of psychiatric symptoms, psychosocial support, and psychiatric treatment (when necessary) may be necessary for COVID-19 patients from the acute to convalescent stages.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , Checklist , China , Humans , Mental Disorders/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Survivors
10.
J Med Virol ; 93(3): 1732-1738, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196496

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) had led to a serious public health crisis, and no specific treatments or vaccines are available yet. A nucleocapsid protein (NP)-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detection method is not only important in disease diagnosis, but is required for the evaluation of vaccine efficacy during the development of an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. In this study, we expressed both the NP and N-terminally truncated NP (ΔN-NP) of SARS-CoV-2 in an Escherichia coli expression system and described the purification of the soluble recombinant NP and ΔN-NP in details. The identities of the NP and ΔN-NP were confirmed with mass spectrometry. We then used immunoglobulin G detection ELISAs to compare the sensitivity of NP and ΔN-NP in detecting anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. ΔN-NP showed greater sensitivity than NP in the analysis of serially diluted sera from mice and rabbits vaccinated with inactive SARS-CoV-2 and in human sera diluted 1:400. ΔN-NP showed a positive detection rate similar to that of the SARS-CoV-2 S protein in human sera. We conclude that ΔN-NP is a better serological marker than NP for evaluating the immunogenicity of inactivated SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/prevention & control , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Phosphoproteins/genetics , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Rabbits , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sequence Deletion/genetics , Sequence Deletion/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
11.
Int J Cardiol ; 329: 260-265, 2021 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-967709

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of fibrinolysis-first strategy on outcomes of patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) during the COVID-19 pandemic was unknown. METHODS: Data from STEMI patients presenting to Fuwai Hospital from January 23 to April 30, 2020 were compared with those during the equivalent period in 2019. The primary end-point was net adverse clinical events (NACE; a composite of death, non-fatal myocardial reinfarction, stroke, emergency revascularization, and bleeding over BARC type 3). The secondary outcome was a composite of recurrent ischaemia, cardiogenic shock, and exacerbated heart failure. RESULTS: The final analysis included 164 acute STEMI patients from 2020 and 240 from 2019. Eighteen patients (20.2% of those with indications) received fibrinolysis therapy in 2020 with a median door-to-needle time of 60.0 (43.5, 92.0) minutes. Patients in 2020 underwent primary PCI less frequently than their counterparts (14 [14.2%] vs. 144 [86.8%] in 2019, P < 0.001), and had a longer median door-to-balloon time (175 [121,213] minutes vs. 115 [83, 160] minutes in 2019, P = 0.009). Patients were more likely to undergo elective PCI (86 [52.4%] vs. 28 [11.6%] in 2019, P < 0.001). The in-hospital NACE was similar between 2020 and 2019 (14 [8.5%] vs. 25 [10.4%], P = 0.530), while more patients developed a secondary outcome in 2020 (20 [12.2%] vs. 12 [5.0%] in 2019, P = 0.009). CONCLUSIONS: The fibrinolysis-first strategy during the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a lower rate of timely coronary reperfusion and increased rates of recurrent ischaemia, cardiogenic shock, and exacerbated heart failure. However, the in-hospital NACE remained similar to that in 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Registries , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome
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