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1.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 19(2): 2222648, 2023 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245273

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 vaccination is effective for cancer patients without safety concerns. However, COVID-19 vaccination hesitancy is common among cancer patients. This study investigated factors affecting primary COVID-19 vaccination series completion rate among cancer patients in China. A multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted in four Chinese cities in different geographic regions between May and June 2022. A total of 893 cancer inpatients provided written informed consent and completed the study. Logistic regression models were fitted. Among the participants, 58.8% completed the primary COVID-19 vaccination series. After adjusting for background characteristics, concerns about interactions between COVID-19 vaccination and cancers/cancer treatment (adjusted odds ratios [AOR]: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.94, 0.99) were associated with lower completion of primary vaccination series. In addition, perceived higher risk of COVID-19 infection comparing to people without cancers (AOR: 0.46, 95%CI: 0.24, 0.88), perceived a high chance of having severe consequences of COVID-19 infection (AOR: 0.68, 95%CI: 0.51, 0.91) were also associated with lower completion rate. Being suggested by significant others (AOR: 1.32, 95%CI: 1.23, 1.41) and perceived higher self-efficacy to receive COVID-19 vaccination (AOR: 1.48, 95%CI: 1.31, 1.67) were positively associated with the dependent variable. Completion rate of primary COVID-19 vaccination series was low among Chinese cancer patients. Given the large population size and their vulnerability, this group urgently needs to increase COVID-19 vaccination coverage. Removing concerns about interactions between COVID-19 vaccination and cancers, using fear appeal approach, involving significant others, and facilitating patients to make a plan to receive COVID-19 vaccination might be useful strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/therapy , Asian People , Vaccination
2.
China CDC Wkly ; 5(10): 223-228, 2023 Mar 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2286283

ABSTRACT

What is already known about this topic?: Cancer patients are more vulnerable and have higher mortality rates from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) than the general population; however, coverage for booster doses of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine was low among cancer patients in China. What is added by this report?: Overall, 32.0% and 56.4% of cancer patients from four Provincial Level Administrative Divisions (PLADs) expressed hesitancy toward the first and second booster doses, respectively. Factors negatively associated with hesitancy to receive booster doses included positive attitudes, perceived support, and higher exposure to COVID-19 vaccination information. Conversely, postvaccination fatigue was positively associated with vaccine hesitancy. What are the implications for public health practice?: Improved COVID-19 vaccination coverage is needed to promote health for cancer patients.

3.
China CDC Wkly ; 5(1): 5-10, 2023 Jan 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2237474

ABSTRACT

What is already known about this topic?: Although a third coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination (booster) dose is highly recommended for diabetic patients, the vaccination behaviors and related adverse events are unclear among diabetic patients with a COVID-19 booster dose. What is added by this report?: Diabetic patients with higher postprandial blood glucose, worrying about the safety of the booster dose were less likely to get the vaccine. While having positive attitudes towards COVID-19 booster vaccination, trusting the health professionals' advice on vaccination, diabetic patients were more likely to get the booster vaccine. Furthermore, the prevalence of adverse events was not significantly different between the homologous and heterologous boosting groups. What are the implications for public health practice?: Effective measures should be taken to promote the COVID-19 booster dose uptake among diabetic patients. Health professionals should educate Chinese diabetic patients about the safety and efficacy of booster doses and continue to increase the COVID-19 booster dose vaccination coverage.

4.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 9: 822680, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109779

ABSTRACT

People living with HIV (PLWH), if infected with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), had an increased risk of mortality compared to people without HIV infection. They are considered as a priority group to receive COVID-19 vaccination. This cross-sectional online survey investigated the prevalence of and factors associated with COVID-19 vaccination uptake among 2740 PLWH aged 18-65 years in eight Chinese metropolitan cities between January and February 2021. As validated by requesting participants to send an image of receipt hiding personal identification, 6.2% of PLWH had taken up COVID-19 vaccination. Participants living in cities where individuals could make an appointment to receive COVID-19 vaccination reported significantly higher uptake than those living in cities without such allowance (11.0 vs. 2.9%, p < 0.001). Being a member of priority groups to receive vaccination, concerning about the side effects of COVID-19 vaccination and its interaction with HIV treatment, and exposing to information on the Internet/social media supporting PLWH to receive COVID-19 vaccination were significantly associated with COVID-19 vaccination uptake in both groups of participants. Receiving advice from the staff of community-based organizations supporting COVID-19 vaccination was associated with higher uptake among participants living in cities where individuals could make an appointment to receive such vaccination, while a shortage in COVID-19 vaccine supply was associated with a lower uptake among participants living in other cities. Our findings presented a snapshot of COVID-19 vaccination uptake among PLWH in the early phase of vaccine rollout in China. It provided a knowledge basis to formulate interventions promoting COVID-19 vaccination for PLWH.

5.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 8(7): e40910, 2022 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2005819

ABSTRACT

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.2196/33995.].

6.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 8(6): e33995, 2022 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1917114

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many countries and organizations recommended people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) receive the COVID-19 vaccine. However, vaccine hesitancy still exists and becomes a barrier for promoting COVID-19 vaccination among PLWHA. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate factors that contributed to COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among PLWHA. METHODS: The study used a multicenter cross-sectional design and an online survey mode. We recruited PLWHA aged 18-65 years from 5 metropolitan cities in China between January 2021 and February 2021. Participants completed an online survey through Golden Data, a widely used encrypted web-based survey platform. Multiple linear regression models were used to assess the background characteristics in relation to COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, and structural equation modeling was performed to assess the relationships among perceived benefits, perceived risks, self-efficacy, subjective norms, and COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. RESULTS: Among 1735 participants, 41.61% (722/1735) reported COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. Older age, no other vaccinations in the past 3 years, and having chronic disease history were positively associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. Structural equation modeling revealed a direct relationship of perceived benefits, perceived risks, and subjective norms with self-efficacy and vaccine hesitancy and an indirect relationship of perceived benefits, perceived risks, and subjective norms with vaccine hesitancy. Moreover, self-efficacy toward COVID-19 vaccination was low. PLWHA had concerns of HIV disclosure during COVID-19 vaccination. Family member support could have an impact on COVID-19 vaccination decision-making. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy was high among PLWHA in China. To reduce COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, programs and strategies should be adopted to eliminate the concerns for COVID-19 vaccination, disseminate accurate information on the safety and efficacy of the COVID-19 vaccine, encourage family member support for COVID-19 vaccination, and improve PLWHA's trust of medical professionals.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Latent Class Analysis , Vaccination Hesitancy
7.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(7)2022 Jun 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911707

ABSTRACT

The health of people with chronic diabetes mellitus (DM) complications will worsen following coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. This cross-sectional study compared perceptions and factors related to COVID-19 vaccination uptake between subgroups of DM inpatients with and without chronic complications in China. A multivariate logistic regression model was used for data analysis. Of the 645 participants, those without any complications reported significantly higher uptake of at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccination (43.2% versus 11.2%, p < 0.001). For people with chronic DM complications, a perception of higher risk and severer consequences of COVID-19 infection, a belief that doctors would suggest they receive COVID-19 vaccination, and a belief that relatives' vaccination uptake would influence their own decision to receive a COVID-19 vaccination were all associated with higher COVID-19 vaccination uptake. For their counterparts without chronic complications, a perception of severer consequences of COVID-19 infection, a belief that receiving COVID-19 vaccination could reduce the risk of infection, and a belief that relatives' vaccination uptake would influence their own decision to receive a COVID-19 vaccination were all associated with higher COVID-19 vaccination uptake. Concerns about the safety and the side effects of vaccination were negatively associated with COVID-19 vaccination uptake in both groups of DM patients. Different strategies might be applied to promote COVID-19 vaccination uptake in DM patients with and without chronic complications.

8.
Frontiers in medicine ; 9, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1905473

ABSTRACT

People living with HIV (PLWH), if infected with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), had an increased risk of mortality compared to people without HIV infection. They are considered as a priority group to receive COVID-19 vaccination. This cross-sectional online survey investigated the prevalence of and factors associated with COVID-19 vaccination uptake among 2740 PLWH aged 18–65 years in eight Chinese metropolitan cities between January and February 2021. As validated by requesting participants to send an image of receipt hiding personal identification, 6.2% of PLWH had taken up COVID-19 vaccination. Participants living in cities where individuals could make an appointment to receive COVID-19 vaccination reported significantly higher uptake than those living in cities without such allowance (11.0 vs. 2.9%, p < 0.001). Being a member of priority groups to receive vaccination, concerning about the side effects of COVID-19 vaccination and its interaction with HIV treatment, and exposing to information on the Internet/social media supporting PLWH to receive COVID-19 vaccination were significantly associated with COVID-19 vaccination uptake in both groups of participants. Receiving advice from the staff of community-based organizations supporting COVID-19 vaccination was associated with higher uptake among participants living in cities where individuals could make an appointment to receive such vaccination, while a shortage in COVID-19 vaccine supply was associated with a lower uptake among participants living in other cities. Our findings presented a snapshot of COVID-19 vaccination uptake among PLWH in the early phase of vaccine rollout in China. It provided a knowledge basis to formulate interventions promoting COVID-19 vaccination for PLWH.

9.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(5)2022 Apr 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847414

ABSTRACT

The population with diabetes is more susceptible to severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-2, and have a significantly higher coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) mortality rate. Previous studies have shown low willingness for the COVID-19 vaccination, and there are limited reports on the behavior and relevance of the COVID-19 vaccination. This study aimed to determine the uptake behavior and associated factors of the COVID-19 vaccine. In our cross-sectional questionnaire-based clinical study, 645 diabetes patients affiliated with two affiliated hospitals of Changzhi Medical College completed the questionnaire between June to October 2021. The health belief model (HBM) was used in examining factors influencing vaccination behavior. After adjusting for covariates with significant differences in social background characteristics, a multivariable logistic regression was used to determine predictors related to uptake in COVID-19 vaccination. A total of 162 vaccinated and 483 unvaccinated eligible diabetic patients were recruited. Patients who believed that the COVID-19 syndrome is severe (aOR3.67, 95%CI 1.88-7.17; p < 0.001), believe that vaccination can significantly reduce the risk of SARS-Cov-2 infection (aOR3.48, 95%CI 1.80-6.73; p < 0.001), believe that vaccination is beneficial to themselves and others (aOR 4.53, 95%CI 1.71-11.99; p = 0.002), think that relatives' vaccination status has a positive impact on their vaccination behavior (aOR 5.68, 95%CI 2.83-11.39; p < 0.001), and were more likely to be vaccinated; worrying about the adverse health effects of COVID-19 vaccination (aOR 0.18, 95%CI 0.09-0.35; p < 0.001) was negatively correlated with COVID-19 vaccination behavior. Health care workers should provide targeted informative interventions based on the safety and protective effects theory of HBM to improve vaccination behavior in patients with diabetes.

10.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(1)2022 Jan 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625891

ABSTRACT

Patients with diabetes are more susceptible to severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-2 infection, but vaccine hesitancy is a problem in this population. We investigated the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine hesitancy among diabetes patients in China through a cross-sectional survey from April and August 2021 using a questionnaire administered to patients at two hospitals affiliated with Changzhi Medical College (Shanxi, China). The health belief model (HBM) is used examining factors influencing vaccine hesitancy. After adjusting for potential confounders, a multivariate logistic regression model was used to analyze correlations between vaccine hesitancy and associated factors. Of the 483 participants, 56.4% (273/483) had vaccine hesitancy, including 58.2% (159/273) who were unsure of being vaccinated and 41.8% (114/273) who were unwilling. Although patients considered SARS-CoV-2 infection to be serious (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.36-6.42; p < 0.001), they had concerns about vaccine safety (aOR = 3.05, 95% CI: 1.89-4.91; p < 0.001). Relatives' vaccination status did not influence participants' willingness to be vaccinated (aOR = 2.43, 95% CI: 1.39-4.25; p < 0.001). Disagreement with physicians' view that vaccination can reduce SARS-CoV-2 infection risk was independently correlated with vaccine hesitancy (aOR = 2.25, 95% CI: 1.28-3.95; p < 0.001). Diabetes patients in China need to be educated on SARS-CoV-2 vaccine safety and protective effects to increase the vaccination rate in this population.

11.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(12): 4964-4970, 2021 12 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565873

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to ravage the world. People living with HIV (PLHIV) are one of the most vulnerable groups. This study aims to identify the factors associated with the uptake and adverse reactions of COVID-19 vaccination. METHODS: We recruited PLHIV in China by convenience sampling between 7 and 23 February 2021. Participants were asked to complete an online questionnaire. Chi-squared test and multivariable logistic regression were used to assess factors associated with vaccine uptake. RESULTS: A total of 527 vaccinated and 1091 unvaccinated PLHIV were recruited. Individuals who had a higher education, engaged in occupations with a higher risk of COVID-19 infection, received influenza or pneumonia vaccine in the past 3 years (5.40, 3.36-8.77), believed in the effectiveness of vaccines (3.01, 2.20-4.12), and received media information regarding COVID-19 vaccine (2.23, 1.61-3.11), were more likely to be vaccinated. Concerning about adverse reactions (0.31, 0.22-0.44), negative impact on the progression of HIV/AIDS (0.36, 0.26-0.50) or antiretroviral therapy (ART) (0.61, 0.44-0.85), disclosure of HIV infection status (0.69, 0.49-0.96), comorbidities (0.33, 0.22-0.47), being unmarried (0.43, 0.28-0.66) and older age were negatively associated with vaccination. Of the 527 vaccinated PLHIV, 155 (29.4%) PLHIV reported adverse reactions, with pain at the injection site being the most common (18.2%). CONCLUSIONS: PLHIV, who are concerned about adverse reactions, negative impact on ART outcome and disclosure of HIV infection status, were less likely to adopt COVID-19 vaccination. To increase vaccination coverage among PLHIV, health-care professionals should emphasize the benefits and necessity of vaccination and provide consultancy regarding adverse reactions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Influenza Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Case-Control Studies , China/epidemiology , HIV Infections/complications , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
12.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(10): e31125, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430625

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: HIV infection is a significant independent risk factor for both severe COVID-19 presentation at hospital admission and in-hospital mortality. Available information has suggested that people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) could benefit from COVID-19 vaccination. However, there is a dearth of evidence on willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccination among PLWHA. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccination among a national sample of PLWHA in China. METHODS: This cross-sectional online survey investigated factors associated with willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccination among PLWHA aged 18 to 65 years living in eight conveniently selected Chinese metropolitan cities between January and February 2021. Eight community-based organizations (CBOs) providing services to PLWHA facilitated the recruitment. Eligible PLWHA completed an online survey developed using a widely used encrypted web-based survey platform in China. We fitted a single logistic regression model to obtain adjusted odds ratios (aORs), which involved one of the independent variables of interest and all significant background variables. Path analysis was also used in the data analysis. RESULTS: Out of 10,845 PLWHA approached by the CBOs, 2740 completed the survey, and 170 had received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. This analysis was performed among 2570 participants who had never received COVID-19 vaccination. Over half of the participants reported willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccination (1470/2570, 57.2%). Perceptions related to COVID-19 vaccination were significantly associated with willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccination, including positive attitudes (aOR 1.11, 95% CI 1.09-1.12; P<.001), negative attitudes (aOR 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.97; P<.001), perceived support from significant others (perceived subjective norm; aOR 1.53, 95% CI 1.46-1.61; P<.001), and perceived behavioral control (aOR 1.13, 95% CI 1.11-1.14; P<.001). At the interpersonal level, receiving advice supportive of COVID-19 vaccination from doctors (aOR 1.99, 95% CI 1.65-2.40; P<.001), CBO staff (aOR 1.89, 95% CI 1.51-2.36; P<.001), friends and/or family members (aOR 3.22, 95% CI 1.93-5.35; P<.001), and PLWHA peers (aOR 2.38, 95% CI 1.85-3.08; P<.001) was associated with higher willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccination. The overall opinion supporting COVID-19 vaccination for PLWHA on the internet or social media was also positively associated with willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccination (aOR 1.59, 95% CI 1.31-1.94; P<.001). Path analysis indicated that interpersonal-level variables were indirectly associated with willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccination through perceptions (ß=.43, 95% CI .37-.51; P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: As compared to PLWHA in other countries and the general population in most parts of the world, PLWHA in China reported a relatively low willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccination. The internet and social media as well as interpersonal communications may be major sources of influence on PLWHA's perceptions and willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , COVID-19 Vaccines , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
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