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1.
Preprint | SciFinder | ID: ppcovidwho-5359

ABSTRACT

A review. In the end of Dec. 2019, an unexplained pneumonia outbroke in Wuhan (the pathogen later confirmed to be novel coronavirus), and then caused a nationwide outbreak, varying quantity of infections have be found in several countries, which cause serious damage to people′s lives and health National Health Committee of the People′s Republic of China published Announcement of the National Health Committee of the People′s Republic of China Number 1 of 2020, what Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) was included in the management of Class B infectious diseases, and measures for the prevention and control of Class A Infectious Diseases should be taken according to the Law on the Prevention and Control of Infectious Diseases. The treatment for COVID-19 is still in exploration, in order to provide reference for subsequent treatment, we will summarize the progress of the therapy in this paper.

2.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 9(1): 104, 2020 Jul 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-672011

ABSTRACT

From December 25, 2019 to January 31, 2020, 33 cases of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were identified in the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine of Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, China, yet none of the affiliated HCWs was infected. Here we analyzed the infection control measures used in three different departments in the Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University and correlated the measures with the corresponding infection data of HCWs affiliated with these departments. We found that three infection control measures, namely the isolation of the presumed positive patients, the use of facemasks and intensified hand hygiene play important roles in preventing nosocomial transmission of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Hand Hygiene/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Isolation/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , China , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/transmission , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
3.
J Med Virol ; 92(7): 833-840, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-164692

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), emerged in Wuhan, China, and has spread globally. However, the transmission route of SARS-CoV-2 has not been fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate SARS-CoV-2 shedding in the excreta of COVID-19 patients. Electronical medical records, including demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory and radiological findings of enrolled patients were extracted and analyzed. Pharyngeal swab, stool, and urine specimens were collected and tested for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Viral shedding at multiple time points in specimens was recorded, and its correlation analyzed with clinical manifestations and the severity of illness. A total of 42 laboratory-confirmed patients were enrolled, 8 (19.05%) of whom had gastrointestinal symptoms. A total of 28 (66.67%) patients tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA in stool specimens, and this was not associated with the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms and the severity of illness. Among them, 18 (64.29%) patients remained positive for viral RNA in the feces after the pharyngeal swabs turned negative. The duration of viral shedding from the feces after negative conversion in pharyngeal swabs was 7 (6-10) days, regardless of COVID-19 severity. The demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory and radiologic findings did not differ between patients who tested positive and negative for SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the feces. Viral RNA was not detectable in urine specimens from 10 patients. Our results demonstrated the presence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the feces of COVID-19 patients and suggested the possibility of SARS-CoV-2 transmission via the fecal-oral route.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Outbreaks , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Virus Shedding , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Electronic Health Records , Feces/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pharynx/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , RNA, Viral/genetics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
4.
Lancet Glob Health ; 8(6): e790-e798, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-141633

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the early stages of the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Hubei, China, the local health-care system was overwhelmed. Physicians and nurses who had no infectious disease expertise were recruited to provide care to patients with COVID-19. To our knowledge, no studies on their experiences of combating COVID-19 have been published. We aimed to describe the experiences of these health-care providers in the early stages of the outbreak. METHODS: We did a qualitative study using an empirical phenomenological approach. Nurses and physicians were recruited from five COVID-19-designated hospitals in Hubei province using purposive and snowball sampling. They participated in semi-structured, in-depth interviews by telephone from Feb 10 to Feb 15, 2020. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using Haase's adaptation of Colaizzi's phenomenological method. FINDINGS: We recruited nine nurses and four physicians. Three theme categories emerged from data analysis. The first was "being fully responsible for patients' wellbeing-'this is my duty'". Health-care providers volunteered and tried their best to provide care for patients. Nurses had a crucial role in providing intensive care and assisting with activities of daily living. The second category was "challenges of working on COVID-19 wards". Health-care providers were challenged by working in a totally new context, exhaustion due to heavy workloads and protective gear, the fear of becoming infected and infecting others, feeling powerless to handle patients' conditions, and managing relationships in this stressful situation. The third category was "resilience amid challenges". Health-care providers identified many sources of social support and used self-management strategies to cope with the situation. They also achieved transcendence from this unique experience. INTERPRETATION: The intensive work drained health-care providers physically and emotionally. Health-care providers showed their resilience and the spirit of professional dedication to overcome difficulties. Comprehensive support should be provided to safeguard the wellbeing of health-care providers. Regular and intensive training for all health-care providers is necessary to promote preparedness and efficacy in crisis management. FUNDING: National Key R&D Program of China, Project of Humanities and Social Sciences of the Ministry of Education in China.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Outbreaks , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Young Adult
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