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1.
Front Cardiovasc Med ; 9: 871425, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952280

ABSTRACT

To protect cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) patients with arrhythmia or possible device malfunction, it is important for health care professionals to provide emergent device evaluation and reprogramming. This case series illustrated the clinical application of realtime remote programming in CIED patients requiring emergent in-person evaluation and reprogramming (ChiCTR2100046883 chictr.org). All remote sessions were performed safely and efficiently by remote electrophysiologists without being in the physical presence of a patient. The implementation of realtime remote programming not only largely reduces the response time to urgent events but also greatly helps to minimize personnel exposure to COVID-19 infection.

2.
Front Cardiovasc Med ; 9: 864398, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1864203

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to seriously imbalanced distribution of follow-up clinics in China, routine in-office visits are erratically attended by many cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) patients. Meanwhile, remote monitoring is significantly underutilized. Novel tools to address the current predicament of routine in-office visits in China is urgently needed. Objectives: To assess the reliability and feasibility of cloud follow-up in CIED patients. Methods: A total of 325 CIED patients from 13 hospitals in Sichuan Province, China, were enrolled. Information on patients' sociodemographic and basic clinical characteristics was collected. All devices were tested and programmed with 5G-cloud follow-up platform in a real-time manner. All patients were surveyed about their acceptance of and preferences regarding cloud follow-up compared to routine in-office visits. Results: Compliance with routine in-office visits in this region was 60.6%. None of the patients were enrolled in remote monitoring services. Clinically important predictors of non-compliance were elderly age (≥75 years old), odds ratio (OR) 2.392 (95% confidence interval, 1.111-5.150); needing notification from a follow-up clinic, OR 2.518 (1.179-5.376); and being beyond 15 months post-implantation, OR 5.440 (2.563-11.543). All cloud follow-up sessions were performed safely and efficiently, without any adverse events. 292 (89.8%) patients preferred cloud follow-up for future device management. Conclusion: Compliance with routine in-office visits in this region has much room for improvement. Cloud follow-up addresses the limitations of an imbalanced distribution of follow-up clinics and geographic barriers for in-office CIED evaluation. Thus, cloud follow-up provides a potential solution to the current predicament of routine in-office visits in China.

3.
Frontiers in cardiovascular medicine ; 9, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1871966

ABSTRACT

To protect cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) patients with arrhythmia or possible device malfunction, it is important for health care professionals to provide emergent device evaluation and reprogramming. This case series illustrated the clinical application of realtime remote programming in CIED patients requiring emergent in-person evaluation and reprogramming (ChiCTR2100046883 chictr.org). All remote sessions were performed safely and efficiently by remote electrophysiologists without being in the physical presence of a patient. The implementation of realtime remote programming not only largely reduces the response time to urgent events but also greatly helps to minimize personnel exposure to COVID-19 infection.

4.
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol ; 45(6): 815-817, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673251

ABSTRACT

We report a case in which real-time remote interrogation and reprogramming of the parameters of a dual-chamber pacemaker was performed during the COVID-19 pandemic. The described case demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of CIED remote programming based on the 5G cloud technology support platform (5G-CTP), and showed that the application of real-time remote programming would help in reducing the risk of cross-infection between doctors and patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pacemaker, Artificial , Humans , Pandemics
5.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(6)2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307525

ABSTRACT

Gene expression and immune status in human tissues are changed with aging. There is a need to develop a comprehensive platform to explore the dynamics of age-related gene expression and immune profiles across tissues in genome-wide studies. Here, we collected RNA-Seq datasets from GTEx project, containing 16 704 samples from 30 major tissues in six age groups ranging from 20 to 79 years old. Dynamic gene expression along with aging were depicted and gene set enrichment analysis was performed among those age groups. Genes from 34 known immune function categories and immune cell compositions were investigated and compared among different age groups. Finally, we integrated all the results and developed a platform named ADEIP (http://gb.whu.edu.cn/ADEIP or http://geneyun.net/ADEIP), integrating the age-dependent gene expression and immune profiles across tissues. To demonstrate the usage of ADEIP, we applied two datasets: severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and human mesenchymal stem cells-assoicated genes. We also included the expression and immune dynamics of these genes in the platform. Collectively, ADEIP is a powerful platform for studying age-related immune regulation in organogenesis and other infectious or genetic diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Organ Specificity/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , RNA-Seq , Young Adult
6.
J Gen Virol ; 102(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910383

ABSTRACT

The emerging pathogen severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused social and economic disruption worldwide, infecting over 9.0 million people and killing over 469 000 by 24 June 2020. Unfortunately, no vaccine or antiviral drug that completely eliminates the transmissible disease coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been developed to date. Given that coronavirus nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1) is a good target for attenuated vaccines, it is of great significance to explore the detailed characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 nsp1. Here, we first confirmed that SARS-CoV-2 nsp1 had a conserved function similar to that of SARS-CoV nsp1 in inhibiting host-protein synthesis and showed greater inhibition efficiency, as revealed by ribopuromycylation and Renilla luciferase (Rluc) reporter assays. Specifically, bioinformatics and biochemical experiments showed that by interacting with 40S ribosomal subunit, the lysine located at amino acid 164 (K164) was the key residue that enabled SARS-CoV-2 nsp1 to suppress host gene expression. Furthermore, as an inhibitor of host-protein expression, SARS-CoV-2 nsp1 contributed to cell-cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase, which might provide a favourable environment for virus production. Taken together, this research uncovered the detailed mechanism by which SARS-CoV-2 nsp1 K164 inhibited host gene expression, laying the foundation for the development of attenuated vaccines based on nsp1 modification.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Lysine/genetics , Ribosomal Proteins/genetics , Ribosome Subunits, Small, Eukaryotic/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Amino Acid Sequence , Amino Acid Substitution , Computational Biology/methods , G1 Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , Genes, Reporter , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Luciferases/genetics , Luciferases/metabolism , Lysine/metabolism , Mutation , Ribosomal Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Ribosomal Proteins/metabolism , Ribosome Subunits, Small, Eukaryotic/metabolism , Ribosome Subunits, Small, Eukaryotic/virology , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Signal Transduction , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
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