Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
1.
Mol Med ; 26(1): 97, 2020 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894988

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a viral respiratory disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome-Coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Patients with this disease may be more prone to venous or arterial thrombosis because of the activation of many factors involved in it, including inflammation, platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction. Interferon gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1-alpha (MIP1α) are cytokines related to thrombosis. Therefore, this study focused on these three indicators in COVID-19, with the hope to find biomarkers that are associated with patients' outcome. METHODS: This is a retrospective single-center study involving 74 severe and critically ill COVID-19 patients recruited from the ICU department of the Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China. The patients were divided into two groups: severe patients and critically ill patients. The serum IP-10, MCP-1 and MIP1α level in both groups was detected using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. The clinical symptoms, laboratory test results, and the outcome of COVID-19 patients were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS: The serum IP-10 and MCP-1 level in critically ill patients was significantly higher than that in severe patients (P < 0.001). However, no statistical difference in MIP1α between the two groups was found. The analysis of dynamic changes showed that these indicators remarkably increased in patients with poor prognosis. Since the selected patients were severe or critically ill, no significant difference was observed between survival and death. CONCLUSIONS: IP-10 and MCP-1 are biomarkers associated with the severity of COVID-19 disease and can be related to the risk of death in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Chemokine CCL2/blood , Chemokine CXCL10/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Respiratory Insufficiency/complications , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/blood , Aged , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biomarkers/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Critical Illness , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/diagnosis , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/mortality , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/mortality , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/mortality , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis
2.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 10: 548582, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-844807

ABSTRACT

Objective: The present study aimed at investigating the clinical risk factors for COVID-19 patients developing from moderate condition to severe condition, and providing reference for early intervention and prognosis. Methods: We collected the clinical data of 24 patients with moderate-to-severe COVID-19 who were admitted to the isolation ward of the First Affiliated Hospital of Bengbu Medical College from January, 2020 to February 20, 2020, and evaluated the data of clinical characteristics, blood test results, inflammatory index, chest CT imaging characteristics, and antiviral treatment, comparing this with the clinical data of 41 patients with moderate condition in the same period. From this comparison we thus summarized the current knowledge of potential risk factors for COVID-19 patients developing from moderate to severe condition. Results: (1) Clinical characteristics: The moderate-to-severe group and the moderate group in terms of combined common underlying diseases and respiratory frequency showed significant difference statistically (t-value were 13.32, 6.17, respectively, P < 0.05), while no significant difference between the two groups in gender, age, or clinical symptoms was statistically observed(P > 0.05). (2) Analysis of blood test results: The lymphocyte count and plasma albumin of the moderate-to-severe group were significantly lower than those of the moderate group (t-values were 4.16, 4.11, respectively, P < 0.05), and the blood glucose and urea of the moderate-to-severe group were significantly higher than those of the moderate group (t-value were 3.27, 4.19, respectively, P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in terms of white blood cell count (WBC), platelet count (PLT), and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) (P > 0.05). (3) Comparison of inflammatory indicators: The level of IL-6 and CRP of the moderate-to-severe group were significantly higher than those of the moderate group (t-values were 2.84, 4.88, respectively, P < 0.05). (4) Imaging comparison: As for patients with moderate COVID-19, the imaging manifestations were the concurrence of ground-glass opacity, patchy shadow, and consolidation shadow in both lungs, diffuse ground-glass opacity in both lungs accompanied by air bronchogram, and large area consolidation of both lungs with pulmonary interstitial changes. The possibility for these patients to develop into severe condition increased, and the differences were statistically significant (t = 10.92, P < 0.05). (5) Clinical antiviral treatment: There was no statistically significant difference in the combination of two or three antiviral drugs between the two groups (χ2 = 0.05, P > 0.05). Conclusion: Current evidence suggested that the combination of common underlying diseases, respiratory frequency, lymphocyte count, blood glucose, albumin, urea level, inflammatory factors (CRP, IL-6), and imaging manifestations collectively contributed to the potential risk factors for the development of COVID-19 from moderate condition to severe condition. Particular attention should be paid to early detection and intervention during clinical work, which will be of vital significance to the ascent of the recovery rate as well as the reduction of mortality.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Disease Progression , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Factors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
3.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-1730

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 is a viral respiratory disease caused by the severe acute respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Patients with this disea

6.
Ann Transl Med ; 8(12): 747, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640177

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) virus has a high incidence rate and strong infectivity. The diagnosis and evaluation of familial outbreaks requires a collective consideration of epidemiological history, molecular detection methods, chest computed tomography (CT), and clinical symptoms. Methods: A group of family patients with COVID-19 diagnosed in Guizhou, China, in February 2020, was retrospectively analyzed. As of March 1, all patients in the group have been discharged from hospital. This study tracked all patients in the group. We report the epidemiology, radiological characteristics, treatment, and clinical outcomes of these patients. Results: We collected a group of 8 clustered cases (3 men and 5 women) from a family with confirmed COVID-19 infection. In the first admission diagnosis, according to the degree of clinical symptoms, the 8 patients were defined as mild type (4/8) or moderate type (4/8). They were also divided according to the CT findings into early period (1/8), progressive period (3/8), and negative on CT scan (4/8); for the first 4 patients, the corresponding CT image scores were 1, 4, 5, and 5 respectively. In this group of COVID-19 patients, half of the patients showed occult clinical manifestations and negative CT performance. We defined these patients as COVID-19-infected patients, or asymptomatic carriers. Conclusions: The family cluster analysis indicated that COVID-19-infected patients (asymptomatic carriers) and symptomatic COVID-19 patients are distinct but coexistent. This may indicate that the infectivity and virulence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2) has decreased. In order to block the transmission pathway of this virus before it spreads, we need to identify the presence of asymptomatic carriers as early as possible.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL