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1.
Int J Public Health ; 68: 1605539, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304960

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To evaluate COVID-19 burnout syndrome among healthcare workers in Taizhou, China. Methods: A total of 1,103 qualified healthcare workers in Taizhou were included in the study. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS) was used to assess burnout syndrome. Results: Among the healthcare workers surveyed, 25.9% experienced COVID-19 burnout syndrome, including 22.3% and 3.6% with mild and moderate burnout, respectively. Multivariate linear regression models revealed associations with emotional exhaustion among healthcare workers, as follows: occupation, education level and professional qualifications. Professional efficacy was impacted by the pandemic, as follows: sex and occupation. The following factors were associated with cynicism among healthcare workers: occupation and underlying disease. Occupation (medical technician vs. physician, ß = -7.40, 95% confidence interval: -12.09 to -2.71, p = 0.002) was significantly related to MBI-GS scores after adjusting for confounding factors. Conclusion: COVID-19 burnout syndrome was common among healthcare workers in Taizhou, China, and its impact was more burdensome to physicians.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 9: 838904, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2224801

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), a worldwide disaster, has already affected lots of people. Effective care and therapy are currently being evaluated in full swing. Purpose: Our purpose was to investigate the effects of tocilizumab, an interleukin-6 receptor inhibitor, on treatment of adult patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. Data Sources Study Selection and Data Extraction: We conducted a meta-analysis and searched for relevant studies on Pubmed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library without restrictions on language from inception until February 1, 2021. Fifteen studies were included for this meta-analysis. Two authors independently selected and screened these studies, assessed the quality of included studies, and extracted related information. Results: Fifteen studies were included in this meta-analysis. The main studies showed that tocilizumab was associated with lower mortality (risk ratio = 0.62, 95% confidence interval = 0.46-0.83; and hazard ratio = 0.61, 95% confidence interval = 0.51-0.72). Using tocilizumab might also affect biochemistry indicators (lowered C-reactive protein and ferritin, increased lymphocyte count). Conclusion: These current bodies of evidence could indicate that early use of tocilizumab was associated with lower mortality in adult patients with COVID-19. Early use of tocilizumab could reduce the mortality rate of adult patients with COVID-19 without obvious fatal side effects, which may be a treatment option in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. Systematic Review Registration: The study protocol was registered on PROSPERO (ID:242811).

3.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; : 2139098, 2022 Nov 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2123046

ABSTRACT

The study aimed to determine the willingness of medical staff to have their children vaccinated with a COVID-19 booster in Taizhou, China. From March 21 to April 19, 2022, an online questionnaire survey was conducted to assess the willingness of medical staff to vaccinate their children with a booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Of the 1,252 medical staff in a tertiary grade hospital in Taizhou who were invited to answer the structured questionnaire, 514 (41.1%) samples had valid information for further data analysis. Four hundred thirty-seven medical staff (85.0%) were willing to have their children receive vaccine boosters. After adjustments for confounding factors, the opinion ('Do you think your child needs a booster vaccination against COVID-19?') (yes vs. no, OR = 6.91, 95% CI: 3.29-14.54), the viewpoint ('What are your thoughts the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccine boosters for children?' (≥12 vs. <12, OR = 13.81, 95% CI: 4.03-), and the attitude ('Your attitude to whether your child is boosting the Covid-19 vaccine?') (yes vs. no, OR = 4.66, 95% CI: 2.30-9.44) were significantly associated with their willingness to have their children receive a COVID-19 vaccine booster. A moderate percentage of the respondents expressed willingness to have their children receive booster vaccines. The findings implied that factors affecting medical staffs' willingness to vaccinate their children with a COVID-19 vaccine booster included viewpoint, opinion, and attitudes.

4.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 836, 2022 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119375

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has raised awareness of infection prevention and control. We found that the incidence of nosocomial infection in neurosurgery has changed. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of "coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) prevention and control measures" on nosocomial infections in neurosurgery. METHODS: To explore changes in nosocomial infections in neurosurgery during the COVID-19 pandemic, the clinical data of inpatients undergoing neurosurgery at Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province between January 1 and April 30, 2020 (COVID-19 era) were first analyzed and then compared with those from same period in 2019 (first pre-COVID-19 era). We also analyzed data between May 1 and December 31, 2020 (post-COVID-19 era) at the same time in 2019 (second pre-COVID-19 era). RESULTS: The nosocomial infection rate was 7.85% (54/688) in the first pre-COVID-19 era and 4.30% (26/605) in the COVID-19 era (P = 0.01). The respiratory system infection rate between the first pre-COVID-19 and COVID-19 eras was 6.1% vs. 2.0% (P < 0.01), while the urinary system infection rate was 1.7% vs. 2.0% (P = 0.84). Between the first pre-COVID-19 and COVID-19 eras, respiratory system and urinary infections accounted for 77.78% (42/54) vs. 46.15% (12/26) and 22.22% (12/54) vs. 46.15% (12/26) of the total nosocomial infections, respectively (P < 0.01). Between the second pre-COVID-19 and post-COVID-19 eras, respiratory system and urinary accounted for 53.66% (44/82) vs. 40.63% (39/96) and 24.39% (20/82) vs. 40.63% (39/96) of the total nosocomial infections, respectively (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of nosocomial infections in neurosurgery reduced during the COVID-19 pandemic. The reduction was primarily observed in respiratory infections, while the proportion of urinary infections increased significantly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross Infection , Neurosurgery , Respiratory Tract Infections , Urinary Tract Infections , Humans , Cross Infection/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Tertiary Care Centers , Urinary Tract Infections/epidemiology , Urinary Tract Infections/complications , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , China/epidemiology
5.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 1022881, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109869

ABSTRACT

Background: Since February 2022, a new Omicron wave of COVID-19 emerged in Shanghai, China. Many healthcare workers came to Shanghai from hospitals of other parts of China as aid workers. Hospitals in areas with mild COVID-19 outbreaks will inevitably be understaffed, it is likely to cause job burnout of stay-behind healthcare workers. Stay-behind healthcare workers were those who had not been dispatched to support COVID-19 prevention and control in other regions. This study was designed to evaluate the burnout among stay-behind healthcare workers in the current COVID-19 Omicron wave in Taizhou, China. Methods: A population-based, anonymous, cross-sectional online survey was designed in the Wen-Juan Xing platform. The survey was sent to all stay-behind healthcare workers of the hospital (n = 1739) from April 29 to May 3, 2022. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS) was used for the burnout survey. For univariate analysis, the χ2 test and one way ANOVA were used to assess differences in categorical variables and continuous variables, respectively. The effect of independent associated risk factors on each type of burnout was examined using the multinomial logistic regression model. Results: A total of 434 participants completed the survey invitation effectively. A total of 71.2% of stay-behind healthcare workers experienced burnout during COVID-19, including 54.8% experiencing mild to moderate burnout and 16.4% experiencing severe burnout. Night shift, depression, social support, positive coping and number of children appeared to be significantly related to mild to moderate burnout. Night shift, depression, social support, positive coping, number of children, professional title, and anxiety appeared to be significantly related to severe burnout. Conclusion: Job burnout among stay-behind healthcare workers was an important problem during the current Omicron wave of COVID-19. Night shift, depression, social support, positive coping, and number of children were associated with mild to moderate and severe burnout. Anxiety and professional title were associated with severe burnout.

6.
J Infect Public Health ; 15(9): 1006-1012, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061555

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Parental vaccine-hesitancy can lead to delays or refusal to vaccinate children despite the availability of vaccines. This is a population-based, cross-sectional study investigating whether parents in China are hesitant to vaccinate their children with a COVID-19 vaccine booster. METHODS: Parents in Taizhou, China, responded to a self-reported online questionnaire on their hesitancy to vaccinate their children with a COVID-19 vaccine booster. Of the 1252 parents who were invited to answer the structured questionnaire, 514 (41.1%) samples had valid data for data analysis. RESULTS: A total of 41.8% of participants were hesitant to give their children a COVID-19 vaccine booster. After adjusting for confounders, parental gender (female vs. male parent, OR=0.56 95% CI: 0.32-0.87), parental opinion (yes vs. no, OR=0.17, 95% CI: 0.09-0.30), parental attitudes (yes vs. no, OR=0.28, 95% CI: 0.16-0.50), the presence of people around them who are generally hesitant to receive COVID-19 booster vaccines for children (yes vs. no, OR=0.14, 95%CI: 0.08-0.23), the individual hesitancy of people around them to administer booster COVID-19 vaccines to children (yes vs. no, OR=0.02, 95%CI: 0.02-0.22), and parents' hesitancy to receive a booster vaccine for their children showed significant correlation. The disparity of factors related to booster vaccine-hesitancy for children between fathers and mothers was also found. CONCLUSIONS: We found that a moderate proportion of parents reported that they were hesitant to give their children a COVID-19 vaccine booster. The results suggest that an in-depth, dynamic assessment and further health education planning are necessary to reduce Chinese parents' hesitancy to vaccinate their children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Child , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Immunization, Secondary , Male , Parents , Vaccination
7.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(5): 2063629, 2022 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1830889

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We explored the willingness to pay for booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine among health-care workers in Taizhou, China. METHODS: A population-based self-administered online questionnaire evaluating the willingness of health-care workers to pay for booster vaccination of COVID-19 vaccine was conducted in Taizhou, China. Of the 1102 health-care workers received the invitation, 1072 (97.3%) had received twice vaccination of COVID-19 vaccine. RESULTS: There were 1569 (53.1%) out of 1072 health-care workers not willing to pay for thebooster dose of COVID-19 vaccines, 348 (32.5%) were willing to pay less than 100CHY for the booster dose of COVID-19 vaccines, only 155 (14.5%) were willing to pay more than 100 CHY. The factors related to willingness to pay for booster dose of COVID-19 vaccines were education level (c2 = 9.42, P = .01) or whether they had adverse effect to COVID-19 vaccines (c2 = 11.87, P < .01) . CONCLUSION: This study found that about half of health-care workers were willing to pay for booster dose of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in Taizhou, China, most of them are willing to pay less than 100 CHY. Health-care workers' willingness to pay for booster dose of COVID-19 vaccines were related to sex, education level, whether they had adverse effect to COVID-19 vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
8.
Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther ; 20(7): 1005-1013, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806119

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) for SARS-CoV-2 infection could contribute to the clinical and public health strategies for managing COVID-19. This umbrella review aimed to explore the accuracy and sensitivity of RADTs for SARS-CoV-2 by assessing the incidence of false positivity associated with them. AREAS COVERED: Meta-analyses and systematic reviews on the sensitivity and specificity of commercially available RADTs with data on false-positive results were identified by searching the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science databases from inception to 31 March 2022. All meta-analyses and systematic reviews on the sensitivity and specificity of rapid antigen tests were included. Data on the author and year, included studies, index tests, sample size, false negatives, false positives, and study quality based on AMSTAR 2 (Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews) rating were extracted from the included meta-analyses and systematic reviews. EXPERT OPINION: The false positivity rates in the included studies ranged from 0.0% - 4.0%. This study summarizes the available evidence on the incidence of false positivity in RADTs and shows it is less than 4.0%. Therefore, our findings imply that RADTs can be an appropriate, economic, and rapid detection method for mass screening of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Sensitivity and Specificity , Systematic Reviews as Topic
9.
Frontiers in medicine ; 9, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1787110

ABSTRACT

Background Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), a worldwide disaster, has already affected lots of people. Effective care and therapy are currently being evaluated in full swing. Purpose Our purpose was to investigate the effects of tocilizumab, an interleukin-6 receptor inhibitor, on treatment of adult patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. Data Sources, Study Selection, and Data Extraction We conducted a meta-analysis and searched for relevant studies on Pubmed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library without restrictions on language from inception until February 1, 2021. Fifteen studies were included for this meta-analysis. Two authors independently selected and screened these studies, assessed the quality of included studies, and extracted related information. Results Fifteen studies were included in this meta-analysis. The main studies showed that tocilizumab was associated with lower mortality (risk ratio = 0.62, 95% confidence interval = 0.46–0.83;and hazard ratio = 0.61, 95% confidence interval = 0.51–0.72). Using tocilizumab might also affect biochemistry indicators (lowered C-reactive protein and ferritin, increased lymphocyte count). Conclusion These current bodies of evidence could indicate that early use of tocilizumab was associated with lower mortality in adult patients with COVID-19. Early use of tocilizumab could reduce the mortality rate of adult patients with COVID-19 without obvious fatal side effects, which may be a treatment option in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. Systematic Review Registration The study protocol was registered on PROSPERO (ID:242811).

10.
Expert Rev Vaccines ; 21(5): 601-608, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Following COVID-19 vaccination, several herpes zoster cases have been reported, making it critical to explore the association between herpes zoster and COVID-19 vaccination. This is especially true in the context of increasing the number of participants enrolled to receive COVID-19 vaccination. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Three databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and EMBASE, were searched for relevant studies before 25 December 2021 according to preliminarily determined inclusion and exclusion criteria without any language limitations. Four cohort studies were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. RESULTS: Compared with the placebo group, there was no evidence that the COVID-19 vaccination group was associated with increased incidence of herpes zoster (Risk ratio [RR]: 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91 to 1.24). There is no evidence that the COVID-19 vaccination from Moderna is associated with the incidence of herpes zoster compared with vaccination from Pfizer (RR: 0.20; 95% CI: 0.01 to 2.99). CONCLUSIONS: To date, there is no evidence of an association between covid-19 vaccination and herpes zoster.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster Vaccine , Herpes Zoster , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Herpes Zoster/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Herpes Zoster Vaccine/adverse effects , Herpesvirus 3, Human , Humans , Vaccination
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