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1.
IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems ; 33(8):1811-1824, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1561119

ABSTRACT

Recently, with the large-scale outbreak of the global financial crisis and public safety incidents (such as COVID-19), high-performance computing has been widely applied to risk prediction, vaccine development, and other fields. In scenarios where high-performance computing infrastructure responds to the instantaneous explosion of computing demands, a crucial issue is to provide large-scale flexible allocation and adjustment of computing capability by rapidly constructing computing clusters. Existing large-scale computing cluster deployment solutions usually utilize source code deployment or other deployment tools. The great challenge of existing deployment methods is to reduce excessive image distribution time and refrain from configuration defects. In this article, we design an intelligent distributed registry deployment (IDRD) architecture based on the OpenStack cloud platform, which adaptively places distributed image repositories using the containerized deployment of multiple registries. We propose a server load priority algorithm to solve multiple registries placement problems in IDRD. Furthermore, we devise a clustering algorithm based on demand density that can optimize the global performance of IDRD and improve large-scale cluster load balancing capabilities, which has been implemented in the TianHe Supercomputing environment. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that IDRD can effectively reduce [Formula Omitted]-[Formula Omitted] of the distribution time of component images and significantly improve the efficiency of large-scale cluster deployment.

2.
Chin Med ; 16(1): 130, 2021 Dec 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551216

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is still spread and has made a severe public health threat around the world. To improve disease progression, emerging Chinese herbal compounds were used in clinical practice and some agents have proven beneficial in treating COVID-19. Here, the relevant literature from basic researches to clinical application were identified and comprehensively assessed. A variety of Chinese herbal compounds have been reported to be effective in improving symptoms and outcomes in patients with COVID-19, particularly together with routine treatment strategy. The pharmacological activities were mainly attributed to the relief of clinical symptoms, inhibition of cytokine storm, and improvement of organ function. Besides, the development of novel antiviral drugs from medicinal herbs were further discussed. The updated laboratory and clinical studies provided the evidence of Chinese herbal compounds such as Lianhua Qingwen prescription, Shufeng Jiedu prescription, and Qingfei Paidu Tang for the relief of COVID-19. However, both of the randomized controlled trials and real world researches need to be done for supporting the evidence including the efficacy and safety in fighting COVID-19.

3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 759444, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518579

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has alienated people from urban green spaces (UGSs) that have various health outcomes for humans. However, little is known about the influential factors of perceived health benefits and use behaviors in UGSs during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aims to explore the key factors that influence perceived health benefits and use behaviors in UGSs and to assess the mediating role of place attachment in relationships during the COVID-19 pandemic in Chinese megacities. Methods: We conducted an online questionnaire survey from December 2020 to March 2021 in Guangzhou and Shenzhen, China. Six multiple regression models were constructed to investigate the main factors by which UGSs influence citizens' perceived health benefits and use behaviors. Four mediation models were established using the structural equation modeling (SEM) method to explore the mediating effect of place attachment. Results: A total of 628 questionnaires were included in the analysis. The results revealed that some UGS components (green space access, maintenance, and soundscape) significantly affected perceived health benefits for citizens (physical, mental, and social health) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conversely, use behaviors (frequency of visits, duration of visits, and activity intensity) were mainly affected by the sociodemographic context but less affected by UGS components. In addition, UGS components were found to significantly predict place attachment, which in turn influenced the perceived health benefits, frequency, and duration of visits. Conclusions: This study distinguished the key factors that affect perceived health benefits and use behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic: green space access, maintenance, soundscape, and sociodemographic characteristics. Place attachment still needs to be considered when discussing how to encourage citizens to visit UGSs during the pandemic. These findings provide implications for policymakers and landscape planners regarding design and management measures for UGSs that are conducive to coping with pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , China/epidemiology , Cities , Health Status , Humans , Parks, Recreational , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 9626, 2021 05 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217712

ABSTRACT

Early classification and risk assessment for COVID-19 patients are critical for improving their terminal prognosis, and preventing the patients deteriorate into severe or critical situation. We performed a retrospective study on 222 COVID-19 patients in Wuhan treated between January 23rd and February 28th, 2020. A decision tree algorithm has been established including multiple factor logistic for cluster analyses that were performed to assess the predictive value of presumptive clinical diagnosis and features including characteristic signs and symptoms of COVID-19 patients. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by adopting Kaplan-Meier survival curve analysis and cox risk regression. The 222 patients were then clustered into two groups: cluster I (common type) and cluster II (high-risk type). High-risk cases can be judged from their clinical characteristics, including: age > 50 years, chest CT images with multiple ground glass or wetting shadows, etc. Based on the classification analysis and risk factor analysis, a decision tree algorithm and management flow chart were established, which can help well recognize individuals who needs hospitalization and improve the clinical prognosis of the COVID-19 patients. Our risk factor analysis and management process suggestions are useful for improving the overall clinical prognosis and optimize the utilization of public health resources during treatment of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Cluster Analysis , Comorbidity , Decision Support Systems, Clinical , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
5.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 97: 107702, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198831

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The clinical characteristics and treatment of patients who tested positive for COVID-19 after recovery remained elusive. Effective antiviral therapy is important for tackling these patients. We assessed the efficacy and safety of favipiravir for treating these patients. METHODS: This is a multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled trial in SARS-CoV-2 RNA re-positive patients. Patients were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either favipiravir, in addition to standard care, or standard care alone. The primary outcome was time to achieve a consecutive twice (at intervals of more than 24 h) negative RT-PCR result for SARS-CoV-2 RNA in nasopharyngeal swab and sputum sample. RESULTS: Between March 27 and May 9, 2020, 55 patients underwent randomization; 36 were assigned to the favipiravir group and 19 were assigned to the control group. Favipiravir group had a significantly shorter time from start of study treatment to negative nasopharyngeal swab and sputum than control group (median 17 vs. 26 days); hazard ratio 2.1 (95% CI [1.1-4.0], p = 0.038). The proportion of virus shedding in favipiravir group was higher than control group (80.6% [29/36] vs. 52.6% [10/19], p = 0.030, respectively). C-reactive protein decreased significantly after treatment in the favipiravir group (p = 0.016). The adverse events were generally mild and self-limiting. CONCLUSION: Favipiravir was safe and superior to control in shortening the duration of viral shedding in SARS-CoV-2 RNA recurrent positive after discharge. However, a larger scale and randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial is required to confirm our conclusion.


Subject(s)
Amides/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Pyrazines/administration & dosage , Reinfection/drug therapy , Administration, Oral , Adult , Aged , Amides/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/blood , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Subsets/drug effects , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Pyrazines/adverse effects , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Reinfection/blood , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Treatment Outcome
6.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 10(1): 45, 2021 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1166939

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The management of discharge COVID-19 patients with recurrent positive SARS-CoV-2 RNA is challenging. However, there are fewer scientific dissertations about the risk of recurrent positive. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between SARS-COV-2 RNA positive duration (SPD) and the risk of recurrent positive. METHODS: This case-control multi-center study enrolled participants from 8 Chinese hospital including 411 participants (recurrent positive 241). Using unadjusted and multivariate-adjusted logistic regression analyses, generalized additive model with a smooth curve fitting, we evaluated the associations between SPD and risk of recurrent positive. Besides, subgroup analyses were performed to explore the potential interactions. RESULTS: Among recurrent positive patients, there were 121 females (50.2%), median age was 50 years old [interquartile range (IQR): 38-63]. In non-adjusted model and adjusted model, SPD was associated with an increased risk of recurrent positive (fully-adjusted model: OR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02-1.08, P = 0.001); the curve fitting was not significant (P = 0.286). Comparing with SPD < 14 days, the risk of recurrent positive in SPD > 28 days was risen substantially (OR = 3.09, 95% CI: 1.44-6.63, P = 0.004). Interaction and stratified analyses showed greater effect estimates of SPD and risk of recurrent positive in the hypertension, low monocyte count and percentage patients (P for interaction = 0.008, 0.002, 0.036, respectively). CONCLUSION: SPD was associated with a higher risk of recurrent positive and especially SPD > 28 day had a two-fold increase in the relative risk of re-positive as compared with SPD < 14 day. What's more, the risk may be higher among those with hypertension and lower monocyte count or percentage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pharynx/virology , RNA, Viral/genetics , Recurrence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Time Factors , Virus Shedding
7.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 12(22): 22413-22424, 2020 11 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966953

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 exhibits both variability and rapid progression, particularly in patients with comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension or cancer. To determine how these underlying disorders exacerbate pneumonia in COVID-19, we evaluated 79 patients with severe COVID-19 and grouped them according to whether or not they had comorbidities. Clinical information, laboratory examinations, immunological function, and treatment outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. Our study revealed that severe COVID-19 patients with comorbidities had higher levels of inflammatory indices, including blood interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-6 and c-reactive protein levels as well as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. These were accompanied by lymphopenia, hypokalemia, hypoalbuminemia, a decrease in either CD4+ T cells or lymphocyte count, and coagulation disorders, which were closely related to poor prognosis. Patients with comorbidities also had longer disease remission times (27 ± 6.7 days) than those without comorbidities (20 ± 6.5 days). Cox multivariate analysis indicated that glucocorticoid therapy and IL-6 were independent prognostic factors. Our findings suggest that coexisting comorbidities aggravate COVID-19 through the excessive release of inflammatory factors and that glucocorticoid therapy may be beneficial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Inflammation/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , C-Reactive Protein/immunology , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/immunology , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-6/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
8.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 12(16): 15946-15953, 2020 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729799

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2(SARS-CoV-2) is the virus responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) pandemic. Despite the extensive studies aiming to understand the pathology of COVID-19, the clinicopathological characteristics and risk factors associated with COVID-19 remain mostly unclear. In this study, we assessed the clinical course and features of COVID-19 patients. FINDINGS: There were 59 patients (54.1%) that had no fever. One-hundred(91.7%) patients required oxygen therapy, which improved percutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2). Seventy-two (66.1%) patients aged over 60; these patients were more likely to develop respiratory symptoms. Only 13(11.9%) patients were positive for anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid, and computed tomography (CT) findings. We found significant differences in age, respiratory symptoms, and heart rates between patients with and without underlying conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that oxygen plays an important role in the treatment of COVID-19 patients and that age and underlying diseases are significant risk factors for COVID-19. Most COVID-19 patients have no fever, and CT provides higher detection rates than antibody- and nucleic acid-based detection methods. METHODS: We analyzed data from 109 confirmed COVID-19 cases. We compared the clinicopathological characteristic of patients stratified according to age and underlying diseases, as well as assessed the detection rates of different diagnostic methods.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Age Factors , Aged , Blood Gas Monitoring, Transcutaneous/methods , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Assessment/methods
9.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 183(1): 213-216, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-617368

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has led to interruption or delay in treatment of breast cancer patient. This commentary aims to standardize the management procedures and ensure complete or relatively complete treatment for breast cancer patients during the outbreak of COVID-19. METHODS: Provide detailed online diagnosis, online treatment recommendations, and face-to-face consultation suggestions. RESULTS: Breast cancer patients who are at high risk of COVID-19 are advised to consult online first. For patients who have undergone online consultation and need face-to-face consultation, try to go to the clinic alone and take necessary precautions. Medical staff should be provided with necessary training about severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) testing and knowledge of standard precautions and personal protective equipment. CONCLUSIONS: This commentary focused on breast cancer patients and provided suggestions to avoid the spread of COVID-19. Some of these suggestions are also suitable for cancer patients in other lesions. We hope our suggestions are useful to oncologists in other countries and help them to overcome this challenge.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care/standards , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Telemedicine/methods , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Breast Neoplasms/virology , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
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