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2.
Eur Radiol ; 2022 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1729285

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the frequency of ipsilateral axillary adenopathy on breast MRI after COVID-19 vaccination. To investigate the duration, outcomes, and associated variables of vaccine-related adenopathy. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, our database was queried for patients who underwent breast MRI following COVID-19 vaccination from January 22, 2021, to March 21, 2021. The frequency of ipsilateral axillary adenopathy and possible associated variables were evaluated, including age, personal history of ipsilateral breast cancer, clinical indication for breast MRI, type of vaccine, side of vaccination, number of doses, and number of days between the vaccine and the MRI exam. The outcomes of the adenopathy were investigated, including the duration of adenopathy and biopsy results. RESULTS: A total of 357 patients were included. The frequency of adenopathy on breast MRI was 29% (104/357 patients). Younger patients and shorter time intervals from the second dose of the vaccine were significantly associated with the development of adenopathy (p = 0.002 for both). Most adenopathy resolved or decreased on follow-up, with 11% of patients presenting persistence of adenopathy up to 64 days after the second dose of the vaccine. Metastatic axillary carcinoma was diagnosed in three patients; all three had a current ipsilateral breast cancer diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine-related adenopathy is a frequent event after COVID-19 vaccination; short-term follow-up is an appropriate clinical approach, except in patients with current ipsilateral breast cancer. Adenopathy may often persist 4-8 weeks after the second dose of the vaccine, thus favoring longer follow-up periods. KEY POINTS: • MRI-detected ipsilateral axillary adenopathy is a frequent benign finding after mRNA COVID-19 vaccination. • Axillary adenopathy following COVID-19 vaccination often persists > 4 weeks after vaccination, favoring longer follow-up periods. • In patients with concurrent ipsilateral breast cancer, axillary adenopathy can represent metastatic carcinoma and follow-up is not appropriate.

3.
Clin Imaging ; 80: 262-267, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347542

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine the imaging findings and potential clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19. METHODS: We performed a single institution retrospective review of patients diagnosed with COVID-19 using real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) who underwent FDG PET/CT for routine cancer care between March 1, 2020 to April 30, 2020, during the height of the pandemic in New York City, New York, United States. PET/CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for imaging findings suspicious for COVID-19. For positive scans, PET and CT findings were recorded, including location, FDG avidity (SUVmax) and CT morphology. Patient demographics and COVID-19 specific clinical data were collected and analyzed with respect to PET/CT scan positivity, lung SUVmax, and time interval between PET/CT and RT-PCR. RESULTS: Thirty-one patients (21 males and 10 females, mean age 57 years ± 16) were evaluated. Thirteen of 31 patients had positive PET/CT scans, yielding a detection rate of 41.9%. Patients with positive scans had significantly higher rates of symptomatic COVID-19 infection (77% vs 28%, p = 0.01) and hospitalizations (46% vs. 0%, p = 0.002) compared to patients with negative scans. Eleven of 13 patients (84.6%) with positive scans had FDG-avid lung findings, with mean lung SUVmax of 5.36. Six of 13 patients (46.2%) had extrapulmonary findings of FDG-avid thoracic lymph nodes. The detection rate was significantly lower when the scan was performed before RT-PCR versus after RT-PCR (18.8% (n = 3/16) vs. 66.7% (n = 10/15), p = 0.009). Lung SUVmax was not associated with COVID-19 symptoms, severity, or disease course. CONCLUSION: FDG PET/CT has limited sensitivity for detecting COVID-19 infection. However, a positive PET scan is associated with higher risk of symptomatic infection and hospitalizations, which may be helpful in predicting disease severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Female , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City , Positron-Emission Tomography , Radiopharmaceuticals , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Radiology ; 300(2): E323-E327, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099797

ABSTRACT

Vaccination-associated adenopathy is a frequent imaging finding after administration of COVID-19 vaccines that may lead to a diagnostic conundrum in patients with manifest or suspected cancer, in whom it may be indistinguishable from malignant nodal involvement. To help the medical community address this concern in the absence of studies and evidence-based guidelines, this special report offers recommendations developed by a multidisciplinary panel of experts from three of the leading tertiary care cancer centers in the United States. According to these recommendations, some routine imaging examinations, such as those for screening, should be scheduled before or at least 6 weeks after the final vaccination dose to allow for any reactive adenopathy to resolve. However, there should be no delay of other clinically indicated imaging (eg, for acute symptoms, short-interval treatment monitoring, urgent treatment planning or complications) due to prior vaccination. The vaccine should be administered on the side contralateral to the primary or suspected cancer, and both doses should be administered in the same arm. Vaccination information-date(s) administered, injection site(s), laterality, and type of vaccine-should be included in every preimaging patient questionnaire, and this information should be made readily available to interpreting radiologists. Clear and effective communication between patients, radiologists, referring physician teams, and the general public should be considered of the highest priority when managing adenopathy in the setting of COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Diagnostic Imaging/methods , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , Lymphadenopathy/etiology , COVID-19 , Humans , Periodicals as Topic , Radiology , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
6.
Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging ; 48(3): 794-799, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-777748

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We reviewed the clinical utility of perfusion (Q)-single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT for diagnosing pulmonary embolus (PE) in patients hospitalized with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2). METHODS: Following the World Health Organization's declaration of a global pandemic, our department policy recommended Q-only SPECT/CT for all patients undergoing nuclear medicine evaluation for suspected PE to reduce the risk of aerosolization of respiratory droplets. We performed a retrospective review of sequential patients admitted with COVID-19 imaged with Q-SPECT/CT between March 17, 2020, and June 30, 2020, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. We recorded patient demographics, clinical symptoms, Wells score (to stratify patients according to pre-test probability for PE prior to Q-SPECT/CT), and noted ancillary imaging findings on CT. RESULTS: Of the 33 patients imaged with Q-SPECT/CT, 6 patients (3 men, 3 women) had a laboratory confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 (mean age, 55, ± 11.4 years, range 33-68). All patients had a current diagnosis of malignancy and had a moderate or high pre-test probability for PE (mean Wells score 2.8, range 2-4). Q-SPECT/CT was positive in 4/6 (67%) of patients. Distribution of pulmonary emboli was bilateral and segmental in 75% of patients. Ancillary acute findings on SPECT/CT included bilateral parenchymal ground glass opacities (n = 5), pleural effusions (n = 2), and pneumomediastinum (n = 1). CONCLUSION: Q-SPECT/CT has clinical utility for diagnosing PE in patients with COVID-19 where there is a contraindication for iodinated contrast media and a moderate or high pre-test probability for PE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Perfusion Imaging/methods , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Probability , RNA, Viral , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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