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3.
J Affect Disord ; 311: 181-188, 2022 08 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1851380

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has greatly impacted individuals' mental health and quality of life, network analysis studies of associations between symptoms of common syndromes during the pandemic are lacking, particularly among Macau residents. This study investigated the network structure of insomnia, anxiety, and depression and explored their associations with quality of life in this population. METHOD: This online survey was conducted in Macau between August 18 and November 9, 2020. Insomnia, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and quality of life were assessed with the Insomnia Severity Index, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire, and World Health Organization Quality of Life-brief version, respectively. Analyses were performed to identify central symptoms and bridge symptoms of this network and their links to quality of life. RESULTS: 975 participants enrolled in this survey. The prevalence of depressive, anxiety and insomnia symptoms were 38.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 35.5%-41.5%), 28.8% (95%CI: 26.0%-31.7%), and 27.6% (95% CI: 24.8%-30.4%), respectively. "Sleep maintenance" had the highest expected influence centrality, followed by "Trouble relaxing", "Interference with daytime functioning", "Irritability", and "Fatigue". Five bridge symptoms were identified: "Sleep problems", "Restlessness", "Irritability", "Severity of sleep onset", and "Motor activity". The insomnia symptom, "Sleep dissatisfaction", had the strongest direct relation to quality of life. CONCLUSION: Insomnia symptoms played a critical role in the distress symptom network regarding node and bridge centrality as well as associations with quality of life among Macau residents. Close attention to these symptoms may be critical to reducing risk and preventing exacerbations in common forms of distress in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Macau , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology
4.
J Med Virol ; 2022 May 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1850131

ABSTRACT

We aimed to analyze the efficacy and safety of an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in people living with HIV (PLWH). A total of 143 PLWH and 50 healthy individuals were included in this study. A commercially available magnetic chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay kit was used to detect serum IgG and IgM antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. Serum levels of SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG were significantly higher in the control group than in the PLWH group (p = 0.001). Overall, 76% of individuals in the control group were detected with seropositivity IgG against SARS-CoV-2 compared to 58% in the PLWH group (p = 0.024). In PLWH with IgG seropositivity, CD4+ T-cell counts before antiretroviral therapy (ART) was higher (p = 0.015). Multivariable analysis indicated that CD4+ T cells at IgG detection (odds ratio [OR] = 1.004, p = 0.006) and time after vaccination (OR = 0.977, p = 0.014) were independently associated with seropositivity IgG against SARS-CoV-2 in PLWH. Neutralizing antibody (nAb) titers in PLWH against wild-type SARS-CoV-2 were similar to those in the control group (p = 0.160). The proportion of seropositive nAbs against wild-type SARS-CoV-2 was also similar (95% in the control group vs. 97% in the PLWH group, p = 0.665). Similar results were obtained when nAb was detected against the delta variants with similar titers (p = 0.355) and a similar proportion of seropositive nAbs were observed (p = 0.588). All the side effects observed in our study were mild and self-limiting. The inactivated COVID-19 vaccine appears to be safe with good immunogenicity in Chinese PLWH.

5.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-335404

ABSTRACT

Background: Any infectious diseases outbreak may lead to negative detrimental psychological impact to individuals and community at large, however;there was no systematic review nor meta-analysis that examined the relationship between early stages of infectious disease outbreaks and mental health in Asia. Methods: /design: A systematic search was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases from 1/1/2000 to 1/6/2020. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we analyzed the psychological impact on confirmed/suspected cases, healthcare workers and the general public during the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak and Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) epidemics. Primary outcomes included prevalence of depression, anxiety, stress, post-traumatic stress disorder, aggression, sleeping problems and psychological symptoms. Result: Twenty-three eligible studies (N=27,325) were included. Random effect model was used to analyze the data using STATA. Of these studies, 11 were related to the SARS outbreak and 12 related to COVID-19 outbreaks. The overall prevalence rate of anxiety during SARS and COVID-19 was 37.8% (95% CI: 21.1- 54.5, P<0.001, I2 = 96.9%) and 34.8% (95% CI: 29.1- 40.4), respectively. For depression, the overall prevalence rate during SARS and COVID-19 was 30.9% (95% CI: 18.6-43.1, P<0.001, I2 = 97.3%) and 32.4% (95% CI: 19.8-45.0, P<0.001, I2 = 99.8%), respectively. The overall prevalence rate of stress was 9.4% (95% CI: -0.4 -19.2, P = 0.015, I2 = 83.3%) and 54.1% (95% CI: 35.7- 72.6, P<0.001, I2 = 98.8%) during SARS and COVID-19, respectively. The overall prevalence of PTSD was 15.1% (95% CI: 8.2-22.0, P < 0.001) during SARS epidemic, calculated by random-effects model (P < 0.05), with significant between-study heterogeneity (I2 = 93.5%). Conclusion: The SARS and COVID-19 epidemics have brought about high levels of psychological distress to individuals. Psychological interventions and contingent digital mental health platform should be promptly established nationwide for continuous surveillance of the increasing prevalence of negative psychological symptoms. Health policymakers and mental health experts should jointly collaborate to provide timely, contingent mental health treatment and psychological support to those in need to reduce the global disease burden.

6.
Journal of Ginseng Research ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1821353

ABSTRACT

The herbal medication Panax ginseng Meyer has widespread use in China, Korea, and other parts of the world. The main constituents of ginseng are ginsenosides, which include over 30 different triterpene saponins. It has been found that ginsenosides and their metabolites including Rg1, compound K, Rb1, Re, Rg3, and Rg5 exert anti-inflammatory activities by binding to the glucocorticoid receptor, modulating inflammation-related signaling, including NF-κB and MAPK signaling, and reducing levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Here, we review the recent literature on the molecular actions of ginsenosides in sepsis, suggesting ways in which they may be used to prevent and treat the disease.

7.
J Affect Disord ; 307: 108-114, 2022 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814607

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To systematically examine the efficacy and safety of antidepressants for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: A systematic search was performed independently by two researchers based on Chinese Journal Net, WanFang, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, PubMed, and EMBASE. RESULTS: Seven studies (n = 92,947) including three retrospective studies (n = 91,083), two randomized clinical trials (RCTs, n = 1649), two prospective cohort study (n = 215) involving (n = 92,947) patients with COVID-19 were examined. For RCTs, fluvoxamine outperformed placebo in reducing clinical deterioration and hospitalisation for COVID-19 patients. For retrospective studies, antidepressants (2 studies) and fluoxetine (1 study) possibly reduced the risk of mortality in patients with COVID-19. Results from two remaining studies supported the superiority of fluvoxamine in reducing risk of mortality in COVID-19 patients. The two RCTs that examined the safety of fluvoxamine for COVID-19 patients found inconsistent results but no significant group differences in the dropout rate. CONCLUSION: This systematic review found emerging evidence for fluvoxamine in reducing the risk of mortality and hospitalisation in COVID-19 patients, but inconsistent evidence for the safety of fluvoxamine in COVID-19 patients. More studies are needed to determine the efficacy and safety of antidepressants for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antidepressive Agents/adverse effects , Fluvoxamine/adverse effects , Humans , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies
8.
Transl Psychiatry ; 12(1): 98, 2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795801

ABSTRACT

Network analysis is an effective approach for examining complex relationships between psychiatric symptoms. This study was designed to examine item-level relationships between depressive and anxiety symptoms using network analysis in an adolescent sample and identified the most central symptoms within the depressive-anxiety symptoms network model. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionire-9 (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Screener (GAD-7), respectively. The structure of depressive and anxiety symptoms was characterized using "Strength" and "Bridge Strength" as centrality indices in the symptom network. Network stability was tested using a case-dropping bootstrap procedure. Finally, a Network Comparison Test (NCT) was conducted to examine whether network characteristics differed on the basis of gender, school grade and residence. Network analysis revealed that nodes PHQ2 ("Sad mood"), GAD6 ("Irritability"), GAD3 ("Worry too much"), and PHQ6 ("Guilty") were central symptoms in the network model of adolescents. Additionally, bridge symptoms linking anxiety and depressive symptoms in this sample were nodes PHQ6 ("Guilty"), PHQ2 ("Sad mood"), and PHQ9 ("Suicide ideation"). Gender, school grade and residence did not significantly affect the network structure. Central symptoms (e.g., Sad mood, Irritability, Worry too much, and Guilty) and key bridge symptoms (e.g., Guilty, Sad mood, and Suicide ideation) in the depressive and anxiety symptoms network may be useful as potential targets for intervention among adolescents who are at risk for or suffer from depressive and anxiety symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
9.
J Affect Disord ; 307: 142-148, 2022 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783445

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is associated with an increased risk of mental health problems including suicide in many subpopulations, but its influence on stable patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) has been studied fleetingly. This study examined the one-year prevalence of suicidality including suicidal ideation (SI), suicide plans (SP), and suicide attempts (SA) as well as their correlates in clinically stable MDD patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional, observational study was conducted between October 1, 2020, and October 15, 2021, in six tertiary psychiatric hospitals. Socio-demographic information, clinical data and one-year prevalence of suicidality were recorded. RESULTS: Altogether, 1718 participants who met the eligibility criteria were included. The overall one-year prevalence of suicidality during the COVID-19 pandemic was 68.04% (95% confidence intervals (CI) =65.84-70.25%), with one-year SI prevalence of 66.4% (95%CI = 64.18-68.65%), SP prevalence of 36.26% (95%CI = 33.99-38.54%), and SA prevalence of 39.35% (95%CI = 37.04-41.66%). Binary logistic regression analyses revealed male gender, married marital status, college education level and above and age were negatively associated with risk of suicidality. Urban residence, unemployed work status, experiences of cyberbullying, a history of suicide among family members or friends, and more severe fatigue, physical pain, and residual depressive symptoms were positively associated with risk of suicidality. CONCLUSIONS: Suicidality is common among clinically stable MDD patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Regular suicide screening and preventive measures should be provided to clinically stable MDD patients during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Suicide , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder, Major/psychology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Suicidal Ideation
10.
J Med Ethics ; 2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779408

ABSTRACT

Although the prevalence of facial recognition-based COVID-19 surveillance tools and techniques, China does not have a facial recognition law to protect its residents' facial data. Oftentimes, neither the public nor the government knows where people's facial images are stored, how they have been used, who might use or misuse them, and to what extent. This reality is alarming, particularly factoring in the wide range of unintended consequences already caused by good-intentioned measures and mandates amid the pandemic. Biometric data are matters of personal rights and national security. In light of worrisome technologies such as deep-fake pornography, the protection of biometric data is also central to the protection of the dignity of the citizens and the government, if not the industry as well. This paper discusses the urgent need for the Chinese government to establish rigorous and timely facial recognition laws to protect the public's privacy, security, and dignity amid COVID-19 and beyond.

11.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 814790, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775798

ABSTRACT

Background: Symptoms of depression and pain often overlap, and they negatively influence the prognosis and treatment outcome of both conditions. However, the comorbidity of depression and pain has not been examined using network analysis, especially in the context of a pandemic. Thus, we mapped out the network connectivity among the symptoms of depression and pain in Wuhan residents in China during the late stage of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from May 25, 2020 to June 18, 2020 in Wuhan, China. Participants' depressive and pain symptoms were assessed using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9) and a pain numeric rating scale (NRS), respectively. Network analyses were performed. Results: In total, 2,598 participants completed all assessments. PHQ4 (fatigue) in the depression community showed the highest strength value, followed by PHQ6 (worthlessness) and PHQ2 (depressed or sad mood). PHQ4 (fatigue) was also the most key bridge symptom liking depression and pain, followed by PHQ3 (sleep difficulties). There were no significant differences in network global strength (females: 4.36 vs. males: 4.29; S = 0.075, P = 0.427), network structure-distribution of edge weights (M = 0.12, P = 0.541), and individual edge weights between male and female participants. Conclusion: Depressive and pain symptoms showed strong cross-association with each other. "Fatigue" was the strongest central and bridge symptom in the network model, while "sleep difficulties" was the second strongest bridge symptom. Targeting treatment of both fatigue and sleep problems may help improve depressive and pain symptoms in those affected.

12.
Front Immunol ; 13: 839433, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775671

ABSTRACT

Background: Omicron scares and speculations are gaining momentum. Amid the nonstop debates and discussions about COVID-19 vaccines, the "vaccine fatigue" phenomenon may become more prevalent. However, to date, no research has systematically examined factors that shape people's vaccine fatigue. To bridge the research gap, this study aims to investigate the antecedents that cause or catalyze people's vaccine fatigue. Methods: A narrative literature review was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, and PsycINFO to identify factors that shape people's vaccine fatigue. The search was completed on December 6, 2021, with a focus on scholarly literature published in English. Results: A total of 37 articles were reviewed and analyzed. Vaccine fatigue was most frequently discussed in the context of infectious diseases in general at the pre-vaccination stage. Vaccine fatigue has been identified in the general public, the parents, and the doctors. Overall, a wide range of antecedents to vaccine fatigue has been identified, ranging from the frequency of immunization demands, vaccine side effects, misconceptions about the severity of the diseases and the need for vaccination, to lack of trust in the government and the media. Conclusion: Vaccine fatigue is people's inertia or inaction towards vaccine information or instruction due to perceived burden and burnout. Our study found that while some contributors to vaccine fatigue are rooted in limitations of vaccine sciences and therefore can hardly be avoided, effective and empathetic vaccine communications hold great promise in eliminating preventable vaccine fatigue across sectors in society.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Fatigue , Humans , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccines/adverse effects
13.
Front Genet ; 13: 805880, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742212

ABSTRACT

The new coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is an emerging pathogen that can cause severe respiratory infections in humans. It is worth noting that many of the affected COVID-19 patients have malignant tumors. In addition, cancer has been identified as a personal risk factor for COVID-19. Transmembrane proteaseserine-2 (TMPRSS2) is a crucial host protease that mediates S protein activation and initially promotes virus entry into host cells. Moreover, it is abnormally expressed in a variety of tumors. However, the systematic analysis of TMPRSS2 aberrations in human cancer remains to be elucidated. Here, we analyzed the genetic changes, RNA expression, and DNA methylation of TMPRSS2 in more than 30 tumors. It has been reported that TMPRSS2 is overexpressed in tumors such as prostate adenocarcinoma (PRAD), and in contrast, the expression of TMPRSS2 is decreased in tumors such as head and neck cancer (HNSC). In addition, TMPRSS2 low DNA methylation was also found in most of these TMPRSS2 high-expressing tumors in this study. Clinical studies have found that there is a significant correlation between the expression of TMPRSS2 and the prognosis of some tumor patients. The expression of TMPRSS2 is also related to the infiltration of cancer-related fibroblasts, and the potential pathways and functional mechanisms were analyzed through KEGG/GO enrichment. In the end, our study planned the genetic and epigenetic variation of TMPRSS2 in human malignant tumors for the first time and provided a relatively comprehensive understanding of the carcinogenic effects of TMPRSS2.

14.
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol ; 35(2): 229-236, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731438

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The negative effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on sleep quality of clinically stable psychiatric patients is unknown. This study examined the prevalence of sleep disturbances and their association with quality of life (QOL) in clinically stable older psychiatric patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This multicenter, cross-sectional study involved older patients attending maintenance treatment at outpatient departments of four major psychiatric hospitals in China. Patients' socio-demographic and clinical characteristics were collected. Sleep disturbances, depressive symptoms, and QOL were assessed with the Insomnia Severity Index, the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, and 2 items of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief version, respectively. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the independent associations of socio-demographic and clinical variables with sleep disturbances, while the association between sleep disturbances and QOL was explored with analysis of covariance. RESULTS: A total of 941 patients were recruited. The prevalence of sleep disturbances was 57.1% (95% CI: 53.9-60.2%). Analysis of covariance revealed that QOL was significantly lower in patients with sleep disturbances compared to those without. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that sleep disturbances were positively and independently associated with more severe depressive symptoms (OR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.26-1.37). Compared to patients with major depressive disorder, those with other psychiatric diagnoses had a significantly higher prevalence of sleep disturbances (OR = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.00-2.08). CONCLUSION: Sleep disturbances were common among clinically stable older psychiatric patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Considering the negative association with QOL, this subpopulation needs regular assessment and timely treatment to reduce their sleep disturbances and improve their QOL.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , Quality of Life/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep
15.
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol ; 35(2): 196-205, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731434

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has profound negative effects on the mental health of clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders. This study examined the influential nodes of psychiatric problems and their associations in this population using network analysis. METHODS: Clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders were consecutively recruited from four major psychiatric hospitals in China from May 22 to July 15, 2020. Depressive and anxiety syndromes (depression and anxiety hereafter), insomnia, posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), pain, and fatigue were measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire, General Anxiety Disorder, Insomnia Severity Index, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist - Civilian Version, and Numeric Rating Scales for pain and fatigue, respectively. RESULTS: A total of 1063 participants were included. The network analysis revealed that depression was the most influential node followed by anxiety as indicated by the centrality index of strength. In contrast, the edge connecting depression and anxiety was the strongest edge, followed by the edge connecting depression and insomnia, and the edge connecting depression and fatigue as indicated by edge-weights. The network structure was invariant by gender based on the network structure invariance test (M = .14, P = .20) and global strength invariance tests (S = .08, P = .30). CONCLUSIONS: Attention should be paid to depression and its associations with anxiety, insomnia, and fatigue in the screening and treatment of mental health problems in clinically stable older psychiatric patients affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Humans , Pain , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
16.
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol ; 35(2): 179-181, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731433
17.
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol ; 35(2): 237-244, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731432

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The pattern of suicidality in older patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic is not clear. This study examined the prevalence of suicidality and its association with quality of life (QOL) among older clinically stable patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted from May 22 to July 15, 2020, among four major tertiary psychiatric hospitals in China. Suicidality was assessed by asking 3 standardized questions. Depressive symptoms, pain, and QOL were assessed with the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the numeric pain rating scale (NPRS), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-brief version, respectively. RESULTS: A total of 1063 clinically stable patients participated and completed the assessment. The prevalence of suicidality was 11.8% (95% CI: 9.9%-13.7%) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that poor treatment adherence (P = .009, OR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.17-2.96) and perceived illness worsening during the COVID-19 outbreak (P = .02, OR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.15-3.73), being diagnosed with major depressive disorder (P < .001, OR = 2.79, 95% CI: 1.68-4.64), PHQ-9 total score (P < .001, OR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.15-1.24) and NPRS total score (P = .002, OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.06-1.29) were associated with higher risk of suicidality. After controlling for covariates, older psychiatric patients with suicidality had lower QOL compared to those without (F(1, 1063) =16.5, P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: Suicidality was common in older patients with clinically stable psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic. Considering its negative impact on QOL and personal suffering, routine screening and preventive suicide measures should be implemented for older psychiatric patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Mental Disorders , Suicide , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Suicide/psychology
18.
Brain Behav Immun ; 102: 206-208, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719357

ABSTRACT

Just weeks away from the Opening Ceremony of the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics, the United States, followed by Australia, the United Kingdom, and Canada, has declared a diplomatic boycott of the Games. A diplomatic boycott stipulates that while government officials of these countries will not attend the event, the athletes' scheduled attendance will largely remain intact. An unintended consequence of the boycotts is that they force the attending athletes to cope with the stress and distress associated with the 2022 Winter Olympics in an unfamiliar environment on their own. It is important to underscore that many of the challenges the athletes could face amid the Games are either deep-rooted or unprecedented, ranging from stressors fuelled by the nonstop media reports, the competitions, to the Omicron scares. These insights combined, in turn, underscore the imperative for effective and preemptive mental health support for Olympic athletes. To shed light on the issue, this paper highlights the reasons why timely solutions are needed to adequately safeguard Olympic athletes' mental health and overall wellbeing, and underlines promising technology-based solutions that can be cost-effectively designed and developed for the athletes.


Subject(s)
Psychoneuroimmunology , Sports , Athletes , Humans , Seasons , United Kingdom
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