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1.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 22(1): 310, 2022 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053859

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 first wave in France, the capacity of intensive care unit (ICU) beds almost doubled, mainly because of the opening of temporary ICUs with staff and equipment from anaesthesia. OBJECTIVES: We aim to investigate if the initial management in temporary ICU is associated with a change in ICU mortality and short-term prognosis. DESIGN: Retrospective single-centre cohort study. SETTING: Surgical ICU of the Bichat Claude Bernard University Hospital during the COVID-19 "first wave" (from 18 March to 10 April 2020). PATIENTS: All consecutive patients older than 18 years of age with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and/or typical radiological patterns were included during their first stay in the ICU for COVID-19. INTERVENTION: Patients were admitted to a temporary ICU if no room was available in the classical ICU and if they needed invasive mechanical ventilation but no renal replacement therapy or Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) in the short term. The temporary ICUs were managed by mixed teams (from the ICU and anaesthesiology departments) following a common protocol and staff meetings. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: ICU mortality RESULTS: Among the 59 patients admitted, 37 (62.7%) patients had initial management in the temporary ICU. They had the same characteristics on admission and the same medical management as patients admitted to the classical ICU. ICU mortality was similar in the 2 groups (32.4% in temporary ICUs versus 40.9% in classical ICUs; p=0.58). SAPS-II and ECMO use were associated with mortality in multivariate analysis but not admission to the temporary ICU. CONCLUSION: In an overload context of the ICU of a geographical area, our temporary ICU model allowed access to intensive care for all patients requiring it without endangering them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Biomedicines ; 10(4)2022 Mar 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834700

ABSTRACT

High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) have multiple endothelioprotective properties. During SARS-CoV-2 infection, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration is markedly reduced, and studies have described severe impairment of the functionality of HDL particles. Here, we report a multi-omic investigation of the first administration of recombinant HDL (rHDL) particles in a severe COVID-19 patient in an intensive care unit. Plasma ApoA1 increased and HDL-C decreased after each recombinant HDL injection, suggesting that these particles were functional in terms of reverse cholesterol transport. The proportion of large HDL particles also increased after injection of recombinant HDL. Shotgun proteomics performed on HDLs isolated by ultracentrifugation indicated that ApoA1 was more abundant after injections whereas most of the pro-inflammatory proteins identified were less abundant. Assessment of Serum amyloid A-1, inflammatory markers, and cytokines showed a significant decrease for most of them during recombinant HDL infusion. Our results suggest that recombinant HDL infusion is feasible and a potential therapeutic strategy to be explored in COVID-19 patients.

3.
Biomedicines ; 10(4):754, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1762667

ABSTRACT

High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) have multiple endothelioprotective properties. During SARS-CoV-2 infection, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration is markedly reduced, and studies have described severe impairment of the functionality of HDL particles. Here, we report a multi-omic investigation of the first administration of recombinant HDL (rHDL) particles in a severe COVID-19 patient in an intensive care unit. Plasma ApoA1 increased and HDL-C decreased after each recombinant HDL injection, suggesting that these particles were functional in terms of reverse cholesterol transport. The proportion of large HDL particles also increased after injection of recombinant HDL. Shotgun proteomics performed on HDLs isolated by ultracentrifugation indicated that ApoA1 was more abundant after injections whereas most of the pro-inflammatory proteins identified were less abundant. Assessment of Serum amyloid A-1, inflammatory markers, and cytokines showed a significant decrease for most of them during recombinant HDL infusion. Our results suggest that recombinant HDL infusion is feasible and a potential therapeutic strategy to be explored in COVID-19 patients.

5.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0239573, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-793642

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus2 has caused a global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). High-density lipoproteins (HDLs), particles chiefly known for their reverse cholesterol transport function, also display pleiotropic properties, including anti-inflammatory or antioxidant functions. HDLs and low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) can neutralize lipopolysaccharides and increase bacterial clearance. HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) decrease during bacterial sepsis, and an association has been reported between low lipoprotein levels and poor patient outcomes. The goal of this study was to characterize the lipoprotein profiles of severe ICU patients hospitalized for COVID-19 pneumonia and to assess their changes during bacterial ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) superinfection. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted in a university hospital ICU. All consecutive patients admitted for COVID-19 pneumonia were included. Lipoprotein levels were assessed at admission and daily thereafter. The assessed outcomes were survival at 28 days and the incidence of VAP. RESULTS: A total of 48 patients were included. Upon admission, lipoprotein concentrations were low, typically under the reference values ([HDL-C] = 0.7[0.5-0.9] mmol/L; [LDL-C] = 1.8[1.3-2.3] mmol/L). A statistically significant increase in HDL-C and LDL-C over time during the ICU stay was found. There was no relationship between HDL-C and LDL-C concentrations and mortality on day 28 (log-rank p = 0.554 and p = 0.083, respectively). A comparison of alive and dead patients on day 28 did not reveal any differences in HDL-C and LDL-C concentrations over time. Bacterial VAP was frequent (64%). An association was observed between HDL-C and LDL-C concentrations on the day of the first VAP diagnosis and mortality ([HDL-C] = 0.6[0.5-0.9] mmol/L in survivors vs. [HDL-C] = 0.5[0.3-0.6] mmol/L in nonsurvivors, p = 0.036; [LDL-C] = 2.2[1.9-3.0] mmol/L in survivors vs. [LDL-C] = 1.3[0.9-2.0] mmol/L in nonsurvivors, p = 0.006). CONCLUSION: HDL-C and LDL-C concentrations upon ICU admission are low in severe COVID-19 pneumonia patients but are not associated with poor outcomes. However, low lipoprotein concentrations in the case of bacterial superinfection during ICU hospitalization are associated with mortality, which reinforces the potential role of these particles during bacterial sepsis.


Subject(s)
Cholesterol, HDL/blood , Cholesterol, LDL/blood , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Pneumonia, Bacterial/blood , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Superinfection/blood , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , France , Hospitals, University , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Bacterial/mortality , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Anesth. Reanim. ; 2020.
Article in English, French | WHO COVID, ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-738087

ABSTRACT

We report here the implementation and the use during 24 days of critical care beds beyond the walls during the COVID-19 outbreak in a teaching university hospital in Paris. These beds were settled in a 14-bed recovery room and two adjacent operating theatres leading to 20 additional critical care beds. The historical timeline, architectural elements, human resources, organisation and medical devices issues are presented. The benefits and limitations of this organisation are discussed.

7.
J Crit Care ; 59: 70-75, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597194

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To survey healthcare workers (HCW) on availability and use of personal protective equipment (PPE) caring for COVID-19 patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHOD: A web-based survey distributed worldwide in April 2020. RESULTS: We received 2711 responses from 1797 (67%) physicians, 744 (27%) nurses, and 170 (6%) Allied HCW. For routine care, most (1557, 58%) reportedly used FFP2/N95 masks, waterproof long sleeve gowns (1623; 67%), and face shields/visors (1574; 62%). Powered Air-Purifying Respirators were used routinely and for intubation only by 184 (7%) and 254 (13%) respondents, respectively. Surgical masks were used for routine care by 289 (15%) and 47 (2%) for intubations. At least one piece of standard PPE was unavailable for 1402 (52%), and 817 (30%) reported reusing single-use PPE. PPE was worn for a median of 4 h (IQR 2, 5). Adverse effects of PPE were associated with longer shift durations and included heat (1266, 51%), thirst (1174, 47%), pressure areas (1088, 44%), headaches (696, 28%), Inability to use the bathroom (661, 27%) and extreme exhaustion (492, 20%). CONCLUSIONS: HCWs reported widespread shortages, frequent reuse of, and adverse effects related to PPE. Urgent action by healthcare administrators, policymakers, governments and industry is warranted.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Health Personnel , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Health , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Adult , Africa , Allied Health Personnel , Asia , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Europe , Eye Protective Devices , Female , Gloves, Protective , Headache/etiology , Hot Temperature , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Masks/adverse effects , Masks/supply & distribution , Middle Aged , North America , Nurses , Oceania , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Physicians , Respiratory Protective Devices/adverse effects , Respiratory Protective Devices/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2 , South America , Surgical Attire , Surveys and Questionnaires , Thirst
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