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1.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-338352

ABSTRACT

Obesity is a major risk factor for COVID-19 severity;however, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Considering that obesity influences the human plasma proteome, we sought to identify circulating proteins mediating the effects of obesity on COVID-19 severity. We first screened 4,907 plasma proteins to identify proteins influenced by body mass index (BMI) using Mendelian randomization (MR). This yielded 1,216 proteins, whose effects on COVID-19 severity were assessed, again using MR. This two-step approach identified nephronectin (NPNT), for which a one standard deviation increase was associated with severe COVID-19 (odds ratio = 1.71, 95% CI: 1.45–2.02, P = 1.63 × 10 -10 ). Colocalization analyses indicated that an NPNT splice isoform drove this effect. Overall, NPNT mediates 3.7% of the total effect of BMI on severe COVID-19. Finally, we found that decreasing body fat mass and increasing fat-free mass can lower NPNT levels and thus may improve COVID-19 outcomes. These findings provide actionable insights into how obesity influences COVID-19 severity.

3.
Butler-Laporte, Guillaume, Povysil, Gundula, Kosmicki, Jack, Cirulli, Elizabeth, Drivas, Theodore, Furini, Simone, Saad, Chadi, Schmidt, Axel, Olszewski, Pawel, Korotko, Urszula, Quinodoz, Mathieu, Çelik, Elifnaz, Kundu, Kousik, Walter, Klaudia, Jung, Junghyung, Stockwell, Amy, Sloofman, Laura, Charney, Alexander, Jordan, Daniel, Beckmann, Noam, Przychodzen, Bartlomiej, Chang, Timothy, Pottinger, Tess, Shang, Ning, Brand, Fabian, Fava, Francesca, Mari, Francesca, Chwialkowska, Karolina, Niemira, Magdalena, Pula, Szymon, Baillie, Kenneth, Stuckey, Alex, Ganna, Andrea, Karczewski, Konrad, Veerapen, Kumar, Bourgey, Mathieu, Bourque, Guillaume, Eveleigh, Robert J. M.; Forgetta, Vincenzo, Morrison, David, Langlais, David, Lathrop, Mark, Mooser, Vincent, Nakanishi, Tomoko, Frithiof, Robert, Hultström, Michael, Lipcsey, Miklos, Marincevic-Zuniga, Yanara, Nordlund, Jessica, Schiabor Barrett, Kelly, Lee, William, Bolze, Alexandre, White, Simon, Riffle, Stephen, Tanudjaja, Francisco, Sandoval, Efren, Neveux, Iva, Dabe, Shaun, Casadei, Nicolas, Motameny, Susanne, Alaamery, Manal, Massadeh, Salam, Aljawini, Nora, Almutairi, Mansour, Arabi, Yaseen, Alqahtan, Saleh, Al Harthi, Fawz, Almutairi, Amal, Alqubaishi, Fatima, Alotaibi, Sarah, Binowayn, Albandari, Alsolm, Ebtehal, Bardisy, Hadeel El, Fawzy, Mohammad, Geschwind, Daniel, Arteaga, Stephanie, Stephens, Alexis, Butte, Manish, Boutros, Paul, Yamaguchi, Takafumi, Tao, Shu, Eng, Stefan, Sanders, Timothy, Tung, Paul, Broudy, Michael, Pan, Yu, Gonzalez, Alfredo, Chavan, Nikhil, Johnson, Ruth, Pasaniuc, Bogdan, Yaspan, Brian, Smieszek, Sandra, Rivolta, Carlo, Bibert, Stephanie, Bochud, Pierre-Yves, Dabrowski, Maciej, Zawadzki, Pawel, Sypniewski, Mateusz, Kaja, Elżbieta, Chariyavilaskul, Pajaree, Nilaratanakul, Voraphoj, Hirankarn, Nattiya, Shotelersuk, Vorasuk, Pongpanich, Monnat, Phokaew, Chureerat, Chetruengchai, Wanna, Kawai, Yosuke, Hasegawa, Takanori, Naito, Tatsuhiko, Namkoong, Ho, Edahiro, Ryuya, Kimura, Akinori, Ogawa, Seishi, Kanai, Takanori, Fukunaga, Koichi, Okada, Yukinori, Imoto, Seiya, Miyano, Satoru, Mangul, Serghei, Abedalthagafi, Malak, Zeberg, Hugo, Grzymski, Joseph, Washington, Nicole, Ossowski, Stephan, Ludwig, Kerstin, Schulte, Eva, Riess, Olaf, Moniuszko, Marcin, Kwasniewski, Miroslaw, Mbarek, Hamdi, Ismail, Said, Verma, Anurag, Goldstein, David, Kiryluk, Krzysztof, Renieri, Alessandra, Ferreira, Manuel, Richards, Brent, Initiative, Covid- Host Genetics, De, C. O. I. Host Genetics Group, Study, Gen-Covid Multicenter, Gen, Omicc Consortium, Japan, Covid-Task Force, Regeneron Genetics, Center.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-332108

ABSTRACT

Host genetics is a key determinant of COVID-19 outcomes. Previously, the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative genome-wide association study used common variants to identify multiple loci associated with COVID-19 outcomes. However, variants with the largest impact on COVID-19 outcomes are expected to be rare in the population. Hence, studying rare variants may provide additional insights into disease susceptibility and pathogenesis, thereby informing therapeutics development. Here, we combined whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing from 21 cohorts across 12 countries and performed rare variant exome-wide burden analyses for COVID-19 outcomes. In an analysis of 5,048 severe disease cases and 571,009 controls, we observed that carrying a rare deleterious variant in the SARS-CoV-2 sensor toll-like receptor TLR7 (on chromosome X) was associated with a 5.3-fold increase in severe disease (95% CI: 2.75-10.05, p=5.41×10 -7 ). These results further support TLR7 as a genetic determinant of severe disease and suggest that larger studies on rare variants influencing COVID-19 outcomes could provide additional insights.

4.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(9)2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699265

ABSTRACT

There are genetic risk factors that influence the outcome of COVID-19 [COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative, Nature 600, 472-477 (2021)]. The major genetic risk factor for severe COIVD-19 resides on chromosome 3 and is inherited from Neandertals [H. Zeberg, S. Pääbo, Nature 587, 610-612 (2020)]. The risk-associated DNA segment modulates the expression of several chemokine receptors, among them CCR5, a coreceptor for HIV which is down-regulated in carriers of the COVID-19 risk haplotype. Here I show that carriers of the risk variant have an ∼27% lower risk of HIV infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , HIV Infections/genetics , HIV-1 , Haplotypes , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Patient Acuity , Risk Factors
5.
Nat Genet ; 54(2): 125-127, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625297

ABSTRACT

The OAS1/2/3 cluster has been identified as a risk locus for severe COVID-19 among individuals of European ancestry, with a protective haplotype of approximately 75 kilobases (kb) derived from Neanderthals in the chromosomal region 12q24.13. This haplotype contains a splice variant of OAS1, which occurs in people of African ancestry independently of gene flow from Neanderthals. Using trans-ancestry fine-mapping approaches in 20,779 hospitalized cases, we demonstrate that this splice variant is likely to be the SNP responsible for the association at this locus, thus strongly implicating OAS1 as an effector gene influencing COVID-19 severity.


Subject(s)
2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Physical Chromosome Mapping , RNA Splicing/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , /genetics , COVID-19/enzymology , Humans , Linkage Disequilibrium/genetics , Risk Factors , /genetics
6.
Hum Genet ; 141(1): 147-173, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565371

ABSTRACT

The combined impact of common and rare exonic variants in COVID-19 host genetics is currently insufficiently understood. Here, common and rare variants from whole-exome sequencing data of about 4000 SARS-CoV-2-positive individuals were used to define an interpretable machine-learning model for predicting COVID-19 severity. First, variants were converted into separate sets of Boolean features, depending on the absence or the presence of variants in each gene. An ensemble of LASSO logistic regression models was used to identify the most informative Boolean features with respect to the genetic bases of severity. The Boolean features selected by these logistic models were combined into an Integrated PolyGenic Score that offers a synthetic and interpretable index for describing the contribution of host genetics in COVID-19 severity, as demonstrated through testing in several independent cohorts. Selected features belong to ultra-rare, rare, low-frequency, and common variants, including those in linkage disequilibrium with known GWAS loci. Noteworthily, around one quarter of the selected genes are sex-specific. Pathway analysis of the selected genes associated with COVID-19 severity reflected the multi-organ nature of the disease. The proposed model might provide useful information for developing diagnostics and therapeutics, while also being able to guide bedside disease management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/physiopathology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Phenotype , Severity of Illness Index , Whole Exome Sequencing , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Female , Germany , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Quebec , SARS-CoV-2 , Sweden , United Kingdom
7.
J Clin Invest ; 131(23)2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546628

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThere is considerable variability in COVID-19 outcomes among younger adults, and some of this variation may be due to genetic predisposition.MethodsWe combined individual level data from 13,888 COVID-19 patients (n = 7185 hospitalized) from 17 cohorts in 9 countries to assess the association of the major common COVID-19 genetic risk factor (chromosome 3 locus tagged by rs10490770) with mortality, COVID-19-related complications, and laboratory values. We next performed metaanalyses using FinnGen and the Columbia University COVID-19 Biobank.ResultsWe found that rs10490770 risk allele carriers experienced an increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.7). Risk allele carriers had increased odds of several COVID-19 complications: severe respiratory failure (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.6-2.6), venous thromboembolism (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.4), and hepatic injury (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-2.0). Risk allele carriers age 60 years and younger had higher odds of death or severe respiratory failure (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.8-3.9) compared with those of more than 60 years (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.8; interaction, P = 0.038). Among individuals 60 years and younger who died or experienced severe respiratory failure, 32.3% were risk-variant carriers compared with 13.9% of those not experiencing these outcomes. This risk variant improved the prediction of death or severe respiratory failure similarly to, or better than, most established clinical risk factors.ConclusionsThe major common COVID-19 genetic risk factor is associated with increased risks of morbidity and mortality, which are more pronounced among individuals 60 years or younger. The effect was similar in magnitude and more common than most established clinical risk factors, suggesting potential implications for future clinical risk management.


Subject(s)
Alleles , COVID-19 , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , Gene Frequency , Genetic Loci , Polymorphism, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2 , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acuity , Risk Factors
8.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 36(6): 599-603, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293396

ABSTRACT

Within Europe, death rates due to COVID-19 vary greatly, with some countries being severely hit while others to date are almost unaffected. This has created a heated debate in particular regarding how effective the different measures applied by the governments are in limiting the spread of the disease and ultimately deaths. It would be of considerable interest to pinpoint the factors that determine a country's susceptibility to a pandemic such as COVID-19. Here we present data demonstrating that mortality due to COVID-19 in a given country could have been predicted to some extent even before the pandemic hit Europe, simply by looking at longitudinal variability of death rates in the years preceding the current outbreak. The variability in death rates during the winter influenza seasons of 2015-2019 correlates to excess mortality in 2020 during the COVID-19 outbreak (Spearman's ρ = 0.68, 95 % CI = 0.40-0.84, p < 0.001). In contrast, there was no correlation with age, population density, latitude, GNP, governmental health spending, number of intensive care beds, degree of urbanization, or rates of influenza vaccination. These data suggest an intrinsic susceptibility in certain countries to excess mortality associated with viral respiratory diseases including COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Aged , Europe/epidemiology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Nat Med ; 27(4): 659-667, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1104522

ABSTRACT

To identify circulating proteins influencing Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) susceptibility and severity, we undertook a two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) study, rapidly scanning hundreds of circulating proteins while reducing bias due to reverse causation and confounding. In up to 14,134 cases and 1.2 million controls, we found that an s.d. increase in OAS1 levels was associated with reduced COVID-19 death or ventilation (odds ratio (OR) = 0.54, P = 7 × 10-8), hospitalization (OR = 0.61, P = 8 × 10-8) and susceptibility (OR = 0.78, P = 8 × 10-6). Measuring OAS1 levels in 504 individuals, we found that higher plasma OAS1 levels in a non-infectious state were associated with reduced COVID-19 susceptibility and severity. Further analyses suggested that a Neanderthal isoform of OAS1 in individuals of European ancestry affords this protection. Thus, evidence from MR and a case-control study support a protective role for OAS1 in COVID-19 adverse outcomes. Available pharmacological agents that increase OAS1 levels could be prioritized for drug development.


Subject(s)
2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/physiology , COVID-19/etiology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , SARS-CoV-2 , 2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/genetics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10 Receptor beta Subunit/genetics , Male , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Middle Aged , Neanderthals , Protein Isoforms/physiology , Quantitative Trait Loci , Severity of Illness Index
10.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(9)2021 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087558

ABSTRACT

It was recently shown that the major genetic risk factor associated with becoming severely ill with COVID-19 when infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is inherited from Neandertals. New, larger genetic association studies now allow additional genetic risk factors to be discovered. Using data from the Genetics of Mortality in Critical Care (GenOMICC) consortium, we show that a haplotype at a region on chromosome 12 associated with requiring intensive care when infected with the virus is inherited from Neandertals. This region encodes proteins that activate enzymes that are important during infections with RNA viruses. In contrast to the previously described Neandertal haplotype that increases the risk for severe COVID-19, this Neandertal haplotype is protective against severe disease. It also differs from the risk haplotype in that it has a more moderate effect and occurs at substantial frequencies in all regions of the world outside Africa. Among ancient human genomes in western Eurasia, the frequency of the protective Neandertal haplotype may have increased between 20,000 and 10,000 y ago and again during the past 1,000 y.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12/genetics , Evolution, Molecular , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Neanderthals/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Haplotypes , Humans , Quantitative Trait Loci
11.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0244824, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004472

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 causes substantial morbidity and mortality in elderly and immunocompromised individuals, particularly in retirement homes, where transmission from asymptomatic staff and visitors may introduce the infection. Here we present a cheap and fast screening method based on direct RT-qPCR to detect SARS-CoV-2 in single or pooled gargle lavages ("mouthwashes"). This method detects individuals with large viral loads (Ct≤29) and we use it to test all staff at a nursing home daily over a period of three weeks in order to reduce the risk that the infection penetrates the facility. This or similar approaches can be implemented to protect hospitals, nursing homes and other institutions in this and future viral epidemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 , Mass Screening , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/genetics , Humans
12.
Nature ; 587(7835): 610-612, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808357

ABSTRACT

A recent genetic association study1 identified a gene cluster on chromosome 3 as a risk locus for respiratory failure after infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). A separate study (COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative)2 comprising 3,199 hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and control individuals showed that this cluster is the major genetic risk factor for severe symptoms after SARS-CoV-2 infection and hospitalization. Here we show that the risk is conferred by a genomic segment of around 50 kilobases in size that is inherited from Neanderthals and is carried by around 50% of people in south Asia and around 16% of people in Europe.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/physiopathology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Neanderthals/genetics , Animals , Asia/ethnology , COVID-19/complications , Case-Control Studies , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , Europe/ethnology , Genetic Variation/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study , Haplotypes/genetics , Hospitalization , Humans , Linkage Disequilibrium/genetics , Multigene Family/genetics , Phylogeny , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/genetics , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/physiopathology
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