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1.
Mayo Clinic Proceedings ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2165688

ABSTRACT

Objective To develop and validate an updated lung injury prediction score (c-LIPS) tailored for predicting acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in coronavirus disease-2019. Patients and Methods This was a registry-based cohort study using the Viral Infection and Respiratory Illness Universal Study. Hospitalized adult patients between January 2020 and January 2022 were screened. Patients who qualified for ARDS within the first day of admission were excluded. Development cohort consisted of patients enrolled from participating Mayo Clinic sites. The validation analyses were carried out on remaining patients enrolled from more than 120 hospitals in 15 countries. The original LIPS was calculated and enhanced using reported COVID-19 specific laboratory risk factors, constituting c-LIPS. The main outcome was ARDS development and secondary outcomes included hospital mortality, invasive mechanical ventilation, progression in World Health Organization ordinal scale. Results The derivation cohort consisted of 3710 patients, of whom 28% developed ARDS. The c-LIPS discriminated COVID-19 patients who developed ARDS with an AUC of 0.79 compared to original LIPS (AUC 0.74, P<.001) with good calibration accuracy (Hosmer-Lemeshow P=.50). Despite different characteristics of the two cohorts, the c-LIPS's performance was comparable in the validation cohort of 5426 patients (16% ARDS), with an AUC of 0.74;and its discriminatory performance was significantly higher than the LIPS (AUC 0.68, P<.001). The c-LIPS's performance in predicting the requirement for invasive mechanical ventilation in derivation and validation cohorts had an AUC of 0.74 and 0.72, respectively. Conclusion In this large patient sample c-LIPS was successfully tailored to predict ARDS in COVID-19 patients.

2.
J Community Hosp Intern Med Perspect ; 12(4): 7-13, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081653

ABSTRACT

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome is a life-threatening condition associated with elevated inflammatory markers and multiple organ injury. A diagnosis of exclusion, it has been reported after severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection (SARS-CoV-2) in children and adults; recently it has been described in some post-COVID-19 vaccinated individuals. The prognosis with supportive care and immunomodulatory therapy is good, although some individuals may require treatment in the intensive care unit (ICU). Here we report a case of a 58-year-old man who developed multi-organ failure after receiving the second dose of the Moderna mRNA-1273 COVID-19 vaccine. He required critical organ support in the ICU. An extensive workup was done to rule out alternative infectious and inflammatory processes. Following a period of gradual in-hospital convalescence, our patient made a full recovery. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensively described case of multisystem inflammatory syndrome associated with Moderna mRNA-1273 COVID-19 vaccine in an adult over 50 years of age.

3.
Arch Bronconeumol ; 58(11): 746-753, 2022 Nov.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007445

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The goal of this investigation is to assess the association between prehospital use of aspirin (ASA) and patient-centered outcomes in a large global cohort of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. METHODS: This study utilizes data from the Society of Critical Care Medicine Discovery Viral Infection and Respiratory Illness Universal Study (VIRUS) Registry. Adult patients hospitalized from February 15th, 2020, to September 30th, 2021, were included. Multivariable regression analyses were utilized to assess the association between pre-hospital use of ASA and the primary outcome of overall hospital mortality. RESULTS: 21,579 patients were included from 185 hospitals (predominantly US-based, 71.3%), with 4691 (21.7%) receiving pre-hospital ASA. Patients receiving ASA, compared to those without pre-admission ASA use, were generally older (median 70 vs. 59 years), more likely to be male (58.7 vs. 56.0%), caucasian (57.4 vs. 51.6%), and more commonly had higher rates of medical comorbidities. In multivariable analyses, patients receiving pre-hospital ASA had lower mortality (HR: 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.97, p=0.01) and reduced hazard for progression to severe disease or death (HR: 0.91, 95% CI 0.84-0.99, p=0.02) and more hospital free days (1.00 days, 95% CI 0.66-1.35, p=0.01) compared to those without pre-hospital ASA use. The overall direction and significance of the results remained the same in sensitivity analysis, after adjusting the multivariable model for time since pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: In this large international cohort, pre-hospital use of ASA was associated with a lower hazard for death in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Randomized controlled trials may be warranted to assess the utility of pre-hospital use of ASA.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Virus Diseases , Adult , Humans , Male , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Aspirin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , Hospitalization , Hospital Mortality
4.
Hosp Pract (1995) ; 50(4): 326-330, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997024

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic severely restricted in-person learning. As a result, many educational institutions switched to online platforms to continue teaching. COVID-19 webinars have been useful for rapidly disseminating information to frontline healthcare workers. While conducting COVID-19 webinars through online platforms is a popular method to train medical professionals, their effectiveness has never been investigated. Our aim was to ascertain the usefulness of COVID-19 webinars during the pandemic. METHODS: We conducted an online survey of about 400 frontline healthcare workers. 112 people responded to the survey (response rate = 28%). In it, we asked several questions to determine whether webinars had been a useful resource to help deal with COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: We found that a majority of healthcare worker respondents had favorable opinions of online education during the pandemic as around 78% of respondents either agreed or highly agreed that webinars are a useful source of knowledge. A significant proportion (34%) did not participate in webinars and gave time constraints as their main reason for not participating. CONCLUSION: Our results indicated that while online education is a great way to disseminate information quickly to a large amount of people, it also comes with its disadvantages. As we transition into a post-pandemic world, we need to make sure that online teaching is designed with the best interests of the healthcare workers in mind to ensure that we get the most out of it.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Simul Healthc ; 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1794973

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY STATEMENT: The Checklist for Early Recognition and Treatment of Acute Illness and iNjury program is a well-established, interactive, and simulation-based program designed to improve the quality of care delivered in intensive care units. The COVID-19 pandemic created an overwhelming surge of critically ill patients worldwide, and infection control concerns limited healthcare providers' access to in-person and hands-on simulation training when they needed it the most. Virtual simulation offers an alternative to in-person training but is often complex and expensive. We describe our successful development and initial implementation of an inexpensive, simulation-based virtual Checklist for Early Recognition and Treatment of Acute Illness and iNjury program to address the pressing need for effective critical care training in various resource-limited settings both within and outside of the United States. The overall satisfaction rate ("excellent" or "very good" responses) was 94.4% after the virtual simulation workshop. Our initial experience suggests that virtual interactions can be engaging and build strong relationships, like in-person continuing professional education, even using relatively simple technology. This knowledge-to-practice improvement platform can be readily adapted to other disciplines beyond critical care medicine.

6.
World J Crit Care Med ; 11(2): 102-111, 2022 Mar 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1791995

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) course may be affected by environmental factors. Ecological studies previously suggested a link between climatological factors and COVID-19 fatality rates. However, individual-level impact of these factors has not been thoroughly evaluated yet. AIM: To study the association of climatological factors related to patient location with unfavorable outcomes in patients. METHODS: In this observational analysis of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Discovery Viral Infection and Respiratory Illness Universal Study: COVID-19 Registry cohort, the latitudes and altitudes of hospitals were examined as a covariate for mortality within 28 d of admission and the length of hospital stay. Adjusting for baseline parameters and admission date, multivariable regression modeling was utilized. Generalized estimating equations were used to fit the models. RESULTS: Twenty-two thousand one hundred eight patients from over 20 countries were evaluated. The median age was 62 (interquartile range: 49-74) years, and 54% of the included patients were males. The median age increased with increasing latitude as well as the frequency of comorbidities. Contrarily, the percentage of comorbidities was lower in elevated altitudes. Mortality within 28 d of hospital admission was found to be 25%. The median hospital-free days among all included patients was 20 d. Despite the significant linear relationship between mortality and hospital-free days (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.39 (1.04, 1.86), P = 0.025 for mortality within 28 d of admission; aOR = -1.47 (-2.60, -0.33), P = 0.011 for hospital-free days), suggesting that adverse patient outcomes were more common in locations further away from the Equator; the results were no longer significant when adjusted for baseline differences (aOR = 1.32 (1.00, 1.74), P = 0.051 for 28-day mortality; aOR = -1.07 (-2.13, -0.01), P = 0.050 for hospital-free days). When we looked at the altitude's effect, we discovered that it demonstrated a non-linear association with mortality within 28 d of hospital admission (aOR = 0.96 (0.62, 1.47), 1.04 (0.92, 1.19), 0.49 (0.22, 0.90), and 0.51 (0.27, 0.98), for the altitude points of 75 MASL, 125 MASL, 400 MASL, and 600 MASL, in comparison to the reference altitude of 148 m.a.s.l, respectively. P = 0.001). We detected an association between latitude and 28-day mortality as well as hospital-free days in this worldwide study. When the baseline features were taken into account, however, this did not stay significant. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that differences observed in previous epidemiological studies may be due to ecological fallacy rather than implying a causal relationship at the patient level.

7.
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) ; 2022 Feb 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708522

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Primary hypothyroidism is a common comorbid condition, but little is known about its association with COVID-19 severity and outcomes. This study aims to identify the frequency of hypothyroidism in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 as well as describe the differences in outcomes between patients with and without pre-existing hypothyroidism using an observational, multinational registry. METHODS: In an observational cohort study we enrolled patients 18 years or older, with laboratory-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 infection between March 2020 and February 2021. The primary outcomes were (1) the disease severity defined as per the World Health Organization Scale for Clinical Improvement, which is an ordinal outcome corresponding with the highest severity level recorded during a patient's index COVID-19 hospitalization, (2) in-hospital mortality and (3) hospital-free days. Secondary outcomes were the rate of intensive care unit (ICU) admission and ICU mortality. RESULTS: Among the 20,366 adult patients included in the study, pre-existing hypothyroidism was identified in 1616 (7.9%). The median age for the Hypothyroidism group was 70 (interquartile range: 59-80) years, and 65% were female and 67% were White. The most common comorbidities were hypertension (68%), diabetes (42%), dyslipidemia (37%) and obesity (28%). After adjusting for age, body mass index, sex, admission date in the quarter year since March 2020, race, smoking history and other comorbid conditions (coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia), pre-existing hypothyroidism was not associated with higher odds of severe disease using the World Health Organization disease severity index (odds ratio [OR]: 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92, 1.13; p = .69), in-hospital mortality (OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.92, 1.15; p = .58) or differences in hospital-free days (estimated difference 0.01 days; 95% CI: -0.45, 0.47; p = .97). Pre-existing hypothyroidism was not associated with ICU admission or ICU mortality in unadjusted as well as in adjusted analysis. CONCLUSIONS: In an international registry, hypothyroidism was identified in around 1 of every 12 adult hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Pre-existing hypothyroidism in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 was not associated with higher disease severity or increased risk of mortality or ICU admissions. However, more research on the possible effects of COVID-19 on the thyroid gland and its function is needed in the future.

8.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:120-120, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1599538

ABSTRACT

The Structured Team-based Optimal Patient-centered care for COVID-19 VIRUS (STOP-VIRUS) Collaborative was created to identify and implement current best COVID-19 practices using standard quality improvement methodology in a learning community of participating U.S. sites. B Introduction: b Interim SCCM VIRUS Registry analysis demonstrated variation in patient outcomes independent of acuity or comorbidity, suggesting opportunities for critical care process improvement. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

9.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:55-55, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1598631

ABSTRACT

B Introduction: b The severity of COVID-19 may be affected by environmental factors. While considering the altitude level, we found that it had a non-linear relationship with 28-day mortality (p=0.001, odds ratios for altitudes 75, 125, 400, and 600 m.a.s.l were: 0.96, 1.04, 0.49, and 0.51, respectively). [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

10.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:79-79, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1598003

ABSTRACT

B Methods: b This was an observational cohort analysis of adult, hospitalized, patients enrolled in the SCCM Discovery VIRUS Registry. B Conclusions: b Our multivariate analysis from a large multinational registry showed that diarrhea was more common in obese patients than non-obese patients. B Introduction: b While obesity is associated with the severity of COVID-19 disease, it is unclear whether gut mechanisms in patients with obesity predispose to increased susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

11.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:49-49, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1598002

ABSTRACT

B Introduction: b Gastrointestinal symptoms are common is patients with COVID-19. There were significant differences in baseline demographics, and signs and symptoms and comorbidities at hospital admission between patients with and without gastrointestinal symptoms. Upon hospitalization, patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms (isolated or along with other non-gastrointestinal symptoms), may have a better prognosis than patients with non-gastrointestinal symptoms. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

12.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:65-65, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1592804

ABSTRACT

B Introduction/Hypothesis: b As of July 2021, more than 4,000,000 deaths have been attributed to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) worldwide. B Conclusions: b Cutaneous manifestation in patients with COVID-19 are rarely reported but the clinical course is little understood. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

13.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:45-45, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1591823

ABSTRACT

The unadjusted odds ratio for severe COVID-19 patients with hypothyroidism was 1.18 (95% CI 1.08, 1.31;p-value < 0.001), for hospital mortality was 1.23 (95% CI 1.09-1.39, p-value < 0.001) and differences in hospital-free days was -0.88 (95% CI 1-1.53--0.23, p-value 0.008). The primary outcomes were 1) the disease severity defined as per the World Health Organization scale for clinical improvement, which is an ordinal outcome corresponding with the highest severity level recorded during a patient's index COVID-19 hospitalization, in-hospital mortality, and hospital free days. B Introduction: b Coronavirus diseases (COVID-19) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality and worse outcomes have been reported for various comorbidities. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

14.
Infez Med ; 29(4): 495-503, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579089

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: To date, only corticosteroids and interleukin-6 (IL-6) inhibitors have been shown to reduce mortality of hospitalized patients with COVID-19. In this literature review, we aimed to summarize infection risk of IL inhibitors, with or without the use of corticosteroids, used to treat hospitalized patients with COVID-19. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using the following evidence-based medicine reviews: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; Embase; Ovid Medline; and Epub Ahead of Print, In-Process, In-Data-Review & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Daily and Versions 1946 to April 28, 2021. All relevant articles were identified using the search terms COVID-19 or SARS-coronavirus-2, infections, interleukins, inpatients, adults, and i ncidence. RESULTS: We identified 36 studies of which 2 were meta-analyses, 5 were randomized controlled trials, 9 were prospective studies, and 20 were retrospective studies. When anakinra was compared with control, 2 studies reported an increased risk of infection, and 3 studies reported a similar or decreased incidence of infection. Canakinumab had a lower associated incidence of infection compared with placebo in one study. When sarilumab was compared with placebo, one study reported an increased risk of infection. Nine studies comparing tocilizumab with placebo reported decreased or no difference in infection risk (odds ratio [OR] for the studies ranged from 0.39-1.21). Fourteen studies comparing tocilizumab with placebo reported an increased risk of infection, ranging from 9.1% to 63.0% (OR for the studies ranged from 1.85-5.04). Infection most commonly presented as bacteremia. Of the 6 studies comparing tocilizumab and corticosteroid use with placebo, 4 reported a nonsignificant increase toward corticosteroids being associated with bacterial infections (OR ranged from 2.76-3.8), and 2 studies reported no increased association with a higher infection risk. CONCLUSIONS: Our literature review showed mixed results with variable significance for the association of IL-6 inhibitors with risk of infections in patients with COVID-19.

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