Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 13 de 13
Filter
1.
J Genet Genomics ; 48(9): 803-814, 2021 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1720312

ABSTRACT

Children are less susceptible to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and they have manifested lower morbidity and mortality after infection, for which a multitude of mechanisms may be considered. Whether the normal development of the gut-airway microbiome in children is affected by COVID-19 has not been evaluated. Here, we demonstrate that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection alters the upper respiratory tract and the gut microbiomes in nine children. The alteration of the microbiome is dominated by the genus Pseudomonas, and it sustains for up to 25-58 days in different individuals. Moreover, the patterns of alternation are different between the upper respiratory tract and the gut. Longitudinal investigation shows that the upper respiratory tract and the gut microbiomes are extremely variable among children during the course of COVID-19. The dysbiosis of microbiome persists in 7 of 8 children for at least 19-24 days after discharge from the hospital. Disturbed development of both the gut and the upper respiratory microbiomes and prolonged dysbiosis in these nine children imply possible long-term complications after clinical recovery from COVID-19, such as predisposition to the increased health risk in the post-COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Computational Biology/methods , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Dysbiosis/microbiology , Dysbiosis/pathology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/physiology , Humans
2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-324964

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 had caused more than 2.8 million deaths globally, and the epidemic will persist for an extended period of time. We analyzed clinical features of patients in the early stage of the epidemic, so as to deepen the understanding of the disease. Methods: : In this retrospective study, we included 84 confirmed cases of COVID-19 during February 1, 2020 and March 31, 2020. Baseline data were used to classify patients as moderate (57%) or severe/critical based on Chinese protocol. We focused on analyzing the differences in chest computed tomography (CT) between the two groups. Results: Of the 84 cases, 50 were male and the median age was 69 years. 55 (65%) patients had comorbidities at admission, more in the severe/critical group (P=0.040). 94% patients had bilateral lesions on CT, up to 68% had lesions involving all lobes. Ground glass opacification (GGO) (96%), consolidation (44%), Linear opacities (50%) and Air bronchogram (23%) were the mainly lesions. The lesion was gradually absorbed over time, but imaging abnormalities can persist for a long time. Compared with moderate cases, the severe/critical group had more pulmonary consolidation changes (P=0.044) and significantly higher CT severity Score (CTSS) (P=0.040). Lymphocyte counts were significantly lower (P=0.011) and NLR were higher (P=0.029) in severe/critical cases. Conclusions: : Chest CT showed bilateral and multiple GGO and consolidation mainly. After treatment, pulmonary lesions were gradually absorbed over time, and imaging abnormalities can be persistent for a long time. Lung consolidation, CTSS, comorbidity, lymphocyte counts, and NLR may be predictors of severe COVID-19.

3.
Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine ; 40(12):1514-1517, 2020.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1350764
4.
Virol Sin ; 35(6): 803-810, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217483

ABSTRACT

To understand the epidemiological and clinical features of the symptomatic and asymptomatic pediatric cases of COVID-19, we carried out a prospective study in Shanghai during the period of January 19 to April 30, 2020. A total of 49 children (mean age 11.5 ± 5.12 years) confirmed with SARS-CoV-2 infection were enrolled in the study, including 11 (22.4%) domestic cases and 38 (77.6%) imported cases. Nine (81.8%) local cases and 12 (31.6%) imported cases had a definitive epidemiological exposure. Twenty-eight (57.1%) were symptomatic and 21 (42.9%) were asymptomatic. Neither asymptomatic nor symptomatic cases progressed to severe diseases. The mean duration of viral shedding for SARS-CoV-2 in upper respiratory tract was 14.1 ± 6.4 days in asymptomatic cases and 14.8 ± 8.4 days in symptomatic cases (P > 0.05). Forty-five (91.8%) cases had viral RNA detected in stool. The mean duration of viral shedding in stool was 28.1 ± 13.3 days in asymptomatic cases and 30.8 ± 18.6 days in symptomatic participants (P > 0.05). Children < 7 years shed viral RNA in stool for a longer duration than school-aged children (P < 0.05). Forty-three (87.8%) cases had seropositivity for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 within 1-3 weeks after confirmation with infection. In conclusion, asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection may be common in children in the community during the COVID-19 pandemic wave. Asymptomatic cases shed viral RNA in a similar pattern as symptomatic cases do. It is of particular concern that asymptomatic individuals are potentially seed transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and pose a challenge to disease control.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Feces/virology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Infant , Male , Prospective Studies , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Tertiary Care Centers , Virus Shedding
5.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 163(4): 714-721, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999415

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of olfactory or gustatory dysfunction in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. STUDY DESIGN: Multicenter case series. SETTING: Five tertiary care hospitals (3 in China, 1 in France, 1 in Germany). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In total, 394 polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed COVID-19-positive patients were screened, and those with olfactory or gustatory dysfunction were included. Data including demographics, COVID-19 severity, patient outcome, and the incidence and degree of olfactory and/or gustatory dysfunction were collected and analyzed. The Questionnaire of Olfactory Disorders (QOD) and visual analog scale (VAS) were used to quantify olfactory and gustatory dysfunction, respectively. All subjects at 1 hospital (Shanghai) without subjective olfactory complaints underwent objective testing. RESULTS: Of 394 screened subjects, 161 (41%) reported olfactory and/or gustatory dysfunction and were included. Incidence of olfactory and/or gustatory disorders in Chinese (n = 239), German (n = 39), and French (n = 116) cohorts was 32%, 69%, and 49%, respectively. The median age of included subjects was 39 years, 92 of 161 (57%) were male, and 10 of 161 (6%) were children. Of included subjects, 10% had only olfactory or gustatory symptoms, and 19% had olfactory and/or gustatory complaints prior to any other COVID-19 symptom. Of subjects with objective olfactory testing, 10 of 90 demonstrated abnormal chemosensory function despite reporting normal subjective olfaction. Forty-three percent (44/102) of subjects with follow-up showed symptomatic improvement in olfaction or gustation. CONCLUSIONS: Olfactory and/or gustatory disorders may represent early or isolated symptoms of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. They may serve as a useful additional screening criterion, particularly for the identification of patients in the early stages of infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Early Diagnosis , Olfaction Disorders/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Smell/physiology , Taste Disorders/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19 , Child , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , France/epidemiology , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Olfaction Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Taste Disorders/epidemiology , Young Adult
7.
Mil Med Res ; 7(1): 41, 2020 09 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745023

ABSTRACT

The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the cause of a rapidly spreading illness, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), affecting more than seventeen million people around the world. Diagnosis and treatment guidelines for clinicians caring for patients are needed. In the early stage, we have issued "A rapid advice guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) infected pneumonia (standard version)"; now there are many direct evidences emerged and may change some of previous recommendations and it is ripe for develop an evidence-based guideline. We formed a working group of clinical experts and methodologists. The steering group members proposed 29 questions that are relevant to the management of COVID-19 covering the following areas: chemoprophylaxis, diagnosis, treatments, and discharge management. We searched the literature for direct evidence on the management of COVID-19, and assessed its certainty generated recommendations using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Recommendations were either strong or weak, or in the form of ungraded consensus-based statement. Finally, we issued 34 statements. Among them, 6 were strong recommendations for, 14 were weak recommendations for, 3 were weak recommendations against and 11 were ungraded consensus-based statement. They covered topics of chemoprophylaxis (including agents and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) agents), diagnosis (including clinical manifestations, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respiratory tract specimens, IgM and IgG antibody tests, chest computed tomography, chest x-ray, and CT features of asymptomatic infections), treatments (including lopinavir-ritonavir, umifenovir, favipiravir, interferon, remdesivir, combination of antiviral drugs, hydroxychloroquine/chloroquine, interleukin-6 inhibitors, interleukin-1 inhibitors, glucocorticoid, qingfei paidu decoction, lianhua qingwen granules/capsules, convalescent plasma, lung transplantation, invasive or noninvasive ventilation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)), and discharge management (including discharge criteria and management plan in patients whose RT-PCR retesting shows SARS-CoV-2 positive after discharge). We also created two figures of these recommendations for the implementation purpose. We hope these recommendations can help support healthcare workers caring for COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Chemoprevention/methods , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Evidence-Based Medicine , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Discharge/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Pers Individ Dif ; 168: 110308, 2021 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691826

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to investigate the multiple mediating effects of perceived social support and anxiety between collective self-esteem and perceived stress during the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. From February 18 to 25, 2020, 1921 participants aged 18-68 were recruited to complete the questionnaire online. The results showed that collective self-esteem reduced the perceived stress by increasing perceived social support and decreasing anxiety, and their chain mediation path. Our findings identified the important factors in reducing perceived stress and their relationship, which can be used to develop interventions to improve the mental health of the general public during the COVID-19 pandemic.

9.
Virol Sin ; 35(6): 734-743, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-662445

ABSTRACT

Children with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) were reported to show milder symptoms and better prognosis than their adult counterparts, but the difference of immune response against SARS-CoV-2 between children and adults hasn't been reported. Therefore we initiated this study to figure out the features of immune response in children with COVID-19. Sera and whole blood cells from 19 children with COVID-19 during different phases after disease onset were collected. The cytokine concentrations, SARS-CoV-2 S-RBD or N-specific antibodies and T cell immune responses were detected respectively. In children with COVID-19, only 3 of 12 cytokines were increased in acute sera, including interferon (IFN)-γ-induced protein 10 (IP10), interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-16. We observed an increase in T helper (Th)-2 cells and a suppression in regulatory T cells (Treg) in patients during acute phase, but no significant response was found in the IFN-γ-producing or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-producing CD8+ T cells in patients. S-RBD and N IgM showed an early induction, while S-RBD and N IgG were prominently induced later in convalescent phase. Potent S-RBD IgA response was observed but N IgA seemed to be inconspicuous. Children with COVID-19 displayed an immunophenotype that is less inflammatory than adults, including unremarkable cytokine elevation, moderate CD4+ T cell response and inactive CD8+ T cell response, but their humoral immunity against SARS-CoV-2 were as strong as adults. Our finding presented immunological characteristics of children with COVID-19 and might give some clues as to why children develop less severe disease than adults.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Antibody Formation , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , COVID-19/virology , Chemokines/blood , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Infant , Interferon-gamma/blood , Interleukin-10/blood , Male , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Th2 Cells/immunology
10.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 1254-1258, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-591914

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in China and quickly spread globally. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of viral shedding from different sites and the neutralizing antibody (NAb) response during the acute and convalescent phases of nine children with COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in their nasopharyngeal swabs (9/9, 100%), stool samples (8/9, 89%), and oropharyngeal swabs (3/9, 33%) but was not detected in their serum and urine samples. The median duration of viral shedding detected in nasopharyngeal swabs, oropharyngeal swabs, and stools was 13, 4, and 43 days respectively, and the maximum duration of viral shedding detected from stools was 46 days after discharge. In children, nasopharyngeal swabs appear to be a more sensitive specimen type for the diagnosis of COVID-19 compared with oropharyngeal swabs. Three of eight patients produced NAbs in the acute phase, and NAbs were detected in all eight patients with convalescent sera. The results of this study provide valuable information for the diagnosis and surveillance of COVID-19 and development of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines for use in children.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Virus Shedding , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Feces/virology , Female , Humans , Infant , Inhibitory Concentration 50 , Male , Nasopharynx/virology , Oropharynx/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
12.
Ann Transl Med ; 8(5): 241, 2020 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-34839

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A recent cluster of pneumonia cases in China was caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We report the screening and diagnosis of corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in our hospital. METHODS: Developed a procedure for the identification of children cases with COVID-19 in outpatient and emergency department of our hospital, then we observed how this process works. RESULTS: (I) There were 56 cases considered suspected cases, and 10 cases were confirmed as COVID-19. (II) Of the 10 confirmed COVID-19 cases admitted in our hospital, 5 were males and 5 were females, aged from 7 months to 11 years, the average age is 6.0±4.2 years, 6 cases were mild pneumonia, the others were upper respiratory tract infection. (III) We followed up 68 patients in isolation at home until symptoms disappeared. Non were missed in the patient's first visit. The sensitivity of this method is 100% and the specificity is 71.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Our screening process works well, and it is also necessary to establish a screening network in the hospital.

13.
Ann Transl Med ; 8(3): 47, 2020 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-4170

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, there has been an outbreak of novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) infection in China. Two cases of neonates with positive 2019-nCoV tests have been reported. Due to the immature immune system and the possibility of vertical transmission from mother to infant, neonates have become a high-risk group susceptible to 2019-nCoV, which emphasize a close cooperation from both perinatal and neonatal pediatrics. In neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), to prevent and control infection, there should be practical measures to ensure the optimal management of children potentially to be infected. According to the latest 2019-nCoV national management plan and the actual situation, the Chinese Neonatal 2019-nCoV expert working Group has put forward measures on the prevention and control of neonatal 2019-nCoV infection.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL