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1.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 921045, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2005905

ABSTRACT

Background: The prevalence of depressive symptoms has become very high among college freshmen, with interpersonal sensitivity serving as an important predictor of depression. Combining internal and external positive resources can effectively prevent and alleviate depression. This study explores the moderating role of psychological capital (PsyCap) in the relationship between interpersonal sensitivity and depression, as well as the moderating effect of familial support on the conditional influence of PsyCap among Chinese college freshmen. Methods: A cross-sectional mental health survey was performed and the anonymous self-reported questionnaires, including the Patient Health Questionnaire, interpersonal sensitivity subscale of Symptom Checklist-90, Psychological Capital Questionnaire 24, and Perceived Social Support from Family, were distributed to the freshmen. Pearson's coefficient was employed to describe correlations between variables. The PROCESS macro and slope difference tests were used to explore the moderating role of PsyCap and family support in the relationship between interpersonal sensitivity and depression. Results: The prevalence of depression among freshmen was 30.89% (694/2,247). The correlation analysis revealed that depression negatively related to PsyCap (r = -0.187, p < 0.001) and family support (r = -0.193, p < 0.001) and positively related to interpersonal sensitivity (r = 0.399, p < 0.001). The moderation analysis showed that PsyCap negatively moderated the positive relationship between interpersonal sensitivity and depression (ß = -0.159, p < 0.001). We also found that family support played a moderating role in the conditional influence of PsyCap (ß = 0.076, p < 0.01). The slope difference test further showed that family support weakened the effect of interpersonal sensitivity on depression in freshmen when they had low PsyCap. Conclusion: More attention should be paid to freshmen's mental health and interpersonal interaction problems. For freshmen with interpersonal sensitivity and depression, mental health departments can conduct PsyCap development interventions to alleviate psychological symptoms. Freshmen themselves should also seek family support in time, but those individuals with high PsyCap should seek an appropriate level of family support to maintain their autonomy.

2.
Front Mol Biosci ; 9: 835590, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952435

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a worldwide emergency, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) do not encode proteins but could participate in immune response. Methods: In our study, 39 COVID-19 patients were enrolled. The microarray of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy and COVID-19 patients was applied to identify the expression profiles of lncRNAs and mRNAs. Identified differentially expressed (DE) lncRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. Then, the lncRNA-mRNA network was constructed and visualized using Cytoscape (3.6.1) based on the Pearson correlation coefficient. The enrichment of DE mRNAs was analyzed using Metascape. The difference in frequencies of immune cells and cytokines was detected using CIBERSORT and ImmPort based on DE mRNAs. Results: All patients with COVID-19 displayed lymphopenia, especially in T cells, and hyper-inflammatory responses, including IL-6 and TNF-α. Four immune-related lncRNAs in COVID-19 were found and further validated, including AC136475.9, CATG00000032642.1, G004246, and XLOC_013290. Functional analysis enriched in downregulation of the T-cell receptor and the antigen processing and presentation as well as increased apoptotic proteins, which could lead to T-cell cytopenia. In addition, they participated in monocyte remodeling, which contributed to releasing cytokines and chemokines and then recruiting more monocytes and aggravating the clinical severity of COVID-19 patients. Conclusion: Taken together, four lncRNAs were in part of immune response in COVID-19, which was involved in the T-cell cytopenia by downregulating the antigen processing and presentation, the T-cell receptor, and an increased proportion of monocytes, with a distinct change in cytokines and chemokines.

3.
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) ; 24(4): 521-522, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752589
4.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 755059, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551544

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic brought about great transformation to medical education mode. Although mobile communication devices played a crucial role in online learning among quarantined university students, the potential smartphone addition problems, negative health behaviors, and psychological symptoms need considerable attention. This study examined the relationship of problematic smartphone use (PSU), sleep quality, and daytime fatigue among medical students. Methods: A web-based survey was conducted in six polyclinic hospitals in Beijing between February and May 2020. 1016 participants (26.01 ± 2.46 years, 65.16% female) completed self-report measurements including Short Version Smartphone Addiction Scale (SAS-SV), Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS), and Subjective Fatigue Scale (FS). Spearman correlation coefficients and multiple regression models were used to analyze the association among PSU, sleep quality, and daytime fatigue. We used structural equation modeling to test the mediating effect of sleep quality between PSU and daytime fatigue. Results: 49.70% of the participants had PSU. Significant positive correlations were found among SAS-SV, AIS, and FS scores (r = 0.35-0.61, P S < 0.001). Subjects with PSU were more likely to report sleep disturbance (ß = 1.07, P < 0.001, OR = 2.91, 95%CI = 2.17-3.91), physical fatigue (ß = 1.16, P < 0.001, OR = 3.18, 95%CI = 2.45-4.15), and mental fatigue (ß = 0.88, P < 0.001, OR = 2.42, 95%CI = 1.86-3.14). The indirect effect of PSU on physical fatigue and mental fatigue mediated by sleep quality accounted for 50.03 and 45.43% of the total effect, respectively. Conclusions: PSU was significantly associated with sleep disturbance and fatigue among medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Sleep quality mediated the relationship between PSU and daytime fatigue. Our results provide valuable information for maintaining medical students' health status and constructing online education structures.

5.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 300, 2021 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351933

ABSTRACT

Elderly people and patients with comorbidities are at higher risk of COVID-19 infection, resulting in severe complications and high mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we investigate whether miRNAs in serum exosomes can exert antiviral functions and affect the response to COVID-19 in the elderly and people with diabetes. First, we identified four miRNAs (miR-7-5p, miR-24-3p, miR-145-5p and miR-223-3p) through high-throughput sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR analysis, that are remarkably decreased in the elderly and diabetic groups. We further demonstrated that these miRNAs, either in the exosome or in the free form, can directly inhibit S protein expression and SARS-CoV-2 replication. Serum exosomes from young people can inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication and S protein expression, while the inhibitory effect is markedly decreased in the elderly and diabetic patients. Moreover, three out of the four circulating miRNAs are significantly increased in the serum of healthy volunteers after 8-weeks' continuous physical exercise. Serum exosomes isolated from these volunteers also showed stronger inhibitory effects on S protein expression and SARS-CoV-2 replication. Our study demonstrates for the first time that circulating exosomal miRNAs can directly inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication and may provide a possible explanation for the difference in response to COVID-19 between young people and the elderly or people with comorbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Diabetes Mellitus/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , China , Circulating MicroRNA/blood , Circulating MicroRNA/genetics , Cohort Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Exercise , Exosomes/genetics , Exosomes/metabolism , Exosomes/virology , Female , Gene Expression Regulation , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Male , MicroRNAs/blood , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/blood , Virus Replication
6.
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) ; 23(9): 1651-1663, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1329010

ABSTRACT

Since the COVID-19 pandemic, physicians concerned about the potential adverse effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). To explore the relationship between ACEIs/ARBs and the risk of mortality and other clinical outcomes in COVID-19 patients, the authors conducted a systemic review and meta-analysis. An electronic search was performed from inception to November 12, 2020 in PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, ClinicalTrials, TRIP, the Cochrane Library, CNKI, Wanfang, and CBM database. Risk of bias was assessed using the Risk Of Bias In Non-randomized Studies of Interventions tool. The primary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included all-cause mortality measured at 30-day or longer term, mechanical ventilation, length of hospital stay, readmission, and cardiac adverse events. A total of 28 studies with 73 465 patients was included. Twenty-two studies with 19 871 patients reported the incidence of all-cause mortality. Results showed no association between using ACEIs/ARBs and risk of mortality crude odds ratio (OR) of 1.02, 95% CI 0.71-1.46, p = .90, I2  = 88%, adjusted OR in 6260 patients of 0.96, 95% CI 0.77-1.18, p = .68, I2  = 0%. While six studies with 10 030 patients reported a lower risk of mortality in ACEIs/ARBs group hazard ratio (HR) of 0.53, 95% CI 0.34-0.84, p = .007, I2  = 68%. Similar association (for HR) was found in hypertension subgroup. There was no significant association for the secondary outcomes. Based on the available data, we concluded that ACEIs/ARBs is not associated with the risk of in-hospital all-cause mortality in COVID-19 patients, but may be associated with a decreased risk of 30-day all-cause mortality. Patients with hypertension may benefit from using ACEIs/ARBs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Transl Pediatr ; 9(6): 849-862, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068182

ABSTRACT

Since early December 2019, patients with unknown pneumonia have been found in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. The pathogen in these cases was quickly identified as a new type of coronavirus. The World Health Organization named it 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV), and the disease caused by the pathogen was called 2019 Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19), which was characterized by higher pathogenicity, transmission of human to human. So it has rapidly spread to more than 190 countries all over the world. With the sudden outbreak of COVID-19, preventing the spread of COVID-19 is the primary problem. Despite fewer children than adults have been affected by the COVID-19, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), as a ward for critically ill patients, is also confronted with high risk of 2019-nCoV infection. It is necessary for PICU managers to thoroughly carry out scientific and effective department management and carefully execute of infection control measures to prevent the transmission. According to recommendations for the COVID-19 prevention and control, the relevant guidelines and the authors' work experience, this paper proposes and optimizes the strategic plan for the management of COVID-19 outbreak in PICU, and emphasizes that department managers should conduct comprehensive risk assessments, manage the pediatric patients and healthcare workers meticulously, strengthen the implementation of infection control measures, and use risk management and process control to effectively manage the department as well as to protect the safety of both the patients and the staff.

8.
International Journal of Imaging Systems and Technology ; 31(1):47-58, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1064367

ABSTRACT

To develop and validate an effective model for distinguishing COVID‐19 from bacterial pneumonia. In the training group and internal validation group, all patients were randomly divided into a training group (n = 245) and a validation group (n = 105). The whole lung lesion on chest computed tomography (CT) was drawn as the region of interest (ROI) for each patient. Both feature selection and model construction were first performed in the training set and then further tested in the validation set with the same thresholds. Additional tests were conducted on an external multicentre cohort with 105 subjects. The diagnostic model of LightGBM showed the best performance, achieving a sensitivity of 0.941, specificity of 0.981, accuracy of 0.962 on the validation dataset. In this study, we established a differential model to distinguish between COVID‐19 and bacterial pneumonia based on chest CT radiomics and clinical indexes.

9.
Ann Palliat Med ; 9(6): 4127-4136, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-961972

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 is a public health issue all over the world. It is an unprecedented challenge for society. Frontline medical staff are at high risk of mental health problems due to the overwhelming workload, worry of infection, and inadequate protective instruments. The study is to investigate the psychological status of medical staff in a women and children's hospital in non-epicenter of COVID-19 during the early stage of the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: A total of 2,143 hospital medical staff participated in a cross-sectional online survey. Psychological response levels were assessed using the Psychological Questionnaire on Emergency Events in Public Health (PQEEPH), and mental health status was measured using the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) scale. RESULTS: Eligible responses were received from 1,890 (90.6%) women and 197 (9.4%) men. In total, 10.3% of respondents rated the psychological impact of the outbreak as moderate or severe, and 4% reported severe anxiety symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicated that the majority of the medical staff are in great level of mental health. The study demonstrates that females, the 31-40 age group, and those who have been widowed experienced greater levels of anxiety and therefore require more support. Furthermore, the cognition of medical workers might affect their emotional reactions. Measures to decrease anxiety during emergency outbreaks should therefore include communication strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Young Adult
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