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1.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 567-572, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1642256

ABSTRACT

Global concern has been raised by the emergence and rapid transmission of the heavily mutated SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant (B.1.1.529). So far, the infection features and immune escape ability of the Omicron variant have not been extensively studied. Here, we produced the Omicron pseudovirus and compared its entry, membrane fusion, and immune escape efficiency with the original strain and the dominating Delta variant. We found the Omicron variant showed slightly higher infectivity than the Delta variant and a similar ability to compete with the Delta variant in using Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in a BHK21-ACE2 cell line. However, the Omicron showed a significantly reduced fusogenicity than the original strain and the Delta variant in both BHK21-ACE2 and Vero-E6 cells. The neutralization assay testing the Wuhan convalescents' sera one-year post-infection showed a more dramatic reduction (10.15 fold) of neutralization against the Omicron variant than the Delta variant (1.79 fold) compared with the original strain with D614G. Notably, immune-boosting through three vaccine shots significantly improved the convalescents' immunity against the Omicron variants. Our results reveal a reduced fusogenicity and a striking immune escape ability of the Omicron variant, highlighting the importance of booster shots against the challenge of the SARS-CoV-2 antigenic drift.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Immune Evasion , Immunization, Secondary , Vero Cells
2.
Innovation (N Y) ; 3(1): 100181, 2022 Jan 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595417

ABSTRACT

Most COVID-19 convalescents can build effective anti-SARS-CoV-2 humoral immunity, but it remains unclear how long it can maintain and how efficiently it can prevent the reinfection of the emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants. Here, we tested the sera from 248 COVID-19 convalescents around 1 year post-infection in Wuhan, the earliest known epicenter. SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G (IgG) was well maintained in most patients and potently neutralizes the infection of the original strain and the B.1.1.7 variant. However, varying degrees of immune escape was observed on the other tested variants in a patient-specific manner, with individuals showing remarkably broad neutralization potency. The immune escape can be largely attributed to several critical spike mutations. These results suggest that SARS-CoV-2 can elicit long-lasting immunity but this is escaped by the emerging variants.

3.
Virol Sin ; 36(5): 934-947, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293454

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has precipitated multiple variants resistant to therapeutic antibodies. In this study, 12 high-affinity antibodies were generated from convalescent donors in early outbreaks using immune antibody phage display libraries. Of them, two RBD-binding antibodies (F61 and H121) showed high-affinity neutralization against SARS-CoV-2, whereas three S2-target antibodies failed to neutralize SARS-CoV-2. Following structure analysis, F61 identified a linear epitope located in residues G446-S494, which overlapped with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) binding sites, while H121 recognized a conformational epitope located on the side face of RBD, outside from ACE2 binding domain. Hence the cocktail of the two antibodies achieved better performance of neutralization to SARS-CoV-2. Importantly, these two antibodies also showed efficient neutralizing activities to the variants including B.1.1.7 and B.1.351, and reacted with mutations of N501Y, E484K, and L452R, indicated that it may also neutralize the recent India endemic strain B.1.617. The unchanged binding activity of F61 and H121 to RBD with multiple mutations revealed a broad neutralizing activity against variants, which mitigated the risk of viral escape. Our findings revealed the therapeutic basis of cocktail antibodies against constantly emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants and provided promising candidate antibodies to clinical treatment of COVID-19 patients infected with broad SARS-CoV-2 variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Humans , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
4.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 6811, 2021 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1149746

ABSTRACT

High rate of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been reported among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Importantly, CVD, as one of the comorbidities, could also increase the risks of the severity of COVID-19. Here we identified phospholipase A2 group VII (PLA2G7), a well-studied CVD biomarker, as a hub gene in COVID-19 though an integrated hypothesis-free genomic analysis on nasal swabs (n = 486) from patients with COVID-19. PLA2G7 was further found to be predominantly expressed by proinflammatory macrophages in lungs emerging with progression of COVID-19. In the validation stage, RNA level of PLA2G7 was identified in nasal swabs from both COVID-19 and pneumonia patients, other than health individuals. The positive rate of PLA2G7 were correlated with not only viral loads but also severity of pneumonia in non-COVID-19 patients. Serum protein levels of PLA2G7 were found to be elevated and beyond the normal limit in COVID-19 patients, especially among those re-positive patients. We identified and validated PLA2G7, a biomarker for CVD, was abnormally enhanced in COVID-19 at both nucleotide and protein aspects. These findings provided indications into the prevalence of cardiovascular involvements seen in patients with COVID-19. PLA2G7 could be a potential prognostic and therapeutic target in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
1-Alkyl-2-acetylglycerophosphocholine Esterase/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Macrophages/metabolism , 1-Alkyl-2-acetylglycerophosphocholine Esterase/blood , 1-Alkyl-2-acetylglycerophosphocholine Esterase/genetics , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , China/epidemiology , Data Mining/methods , Humans , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/pathology , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Transcriptional Activation , Up-Regulation
6.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 98(4): 115199, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-741168

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 positive (194) and negative (212) pneumonia patients were selected to analyze bacterial pathogens coinfection. Results showed that 50% of COVID-19 patients were coinfected or carried bacterial pathogens. Bordetella pertussis infection rate was significantly higher in positive patients. Consequently, preventions should be taken to control bacterial pathogens coinfection in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Coinfection/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pseudomonas Infections/epidemiology , Whooping Cough/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Bordetella pertussis/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Coinfection/microbiology , Coinfection/pathology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/isolation & purification , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
7.
Lancet ; 395(10224): 565-574, 2020 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-80

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In late December, 2019, patients presenting with viral pneumonia due to an unidentified microbial agent were reported in Wuhan, China. A novel coronavirus was subsequently identified as the causative pathogen, provisionally named 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). As of Jan 26, 2020, more than 2000 cases of 2019-nCoV infection have been confirmed, most of which involved people living in or visiting Wuhan, and human-to-human transmission has been confirmed. METHODS: We did next-generation sequencing of samples from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and cultured isolates from nine inpatients, eight of whom had visited the Huanan seafood market in Wuhan. Complete and partial 2019-nCoV genome sequences were obtained from these individuals. Viral contigs were connected using Sanger sequencing to obtain the full-length genomes, with the terminal regions determined by rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Phylogenetic analysis of these 2019-nCoV genomes and those of other coronaviruses was used to determine the evolutionary history of the virus and help infer its likely origin. Homology modelling was done to explore the likely receptor-binding properties of the virus. FINDINGS: The ten genome sequences of 2019-nCoV obtained from the nine patients were extremely similar, exhibiting more than 99·98% sequence identity. Notably, 2019-nCoV was closely related (with 88% identity) to two bat-derived severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-like coronaviruses, bat-SL-CoVZC45 and bat-SL-CoVZXC21, collected in 2018 in Zhoushan, eastern China, but were more distant from SARS-CoV (about 79%) and MERS-CoV (about 50%). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 2019-nCoV fell within the subgenus Sarbecovirus of the genus Betacoronavirus, with a relatively long branch length to its closest relatives bat-SL-CoVZC45 and bat-SL-CoVZXC21, and was genetically distinct from SARS-CoV. Notably, homology modelling revealed that 2019-nCoV had a similar receptor-binding domain structure to that of SARS-CoV, despite amino acid variation at some key residues. INTERPRETATION: 2019-nCoV is sufficiently divergent from SARS-CoV to be considered a new human-infecting betacoronavirus. Although our phylogenetic analysis suggests that bats might be the original host of this virus, an animal sold at the seafood market in Wuhan might represent an intermediate host facilitating the emergence of the virus in humans. Importantly, structural analysis suggests that 2019-nCoV might be able to bind to the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor in humans. The future evolution, adaptation, and spread of this virus warrant urgent investigation. FUNDING: National Key Research and Development Program of China, National Major Project for Control and Prevention of Infectious Disease in China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shandong First Medical University.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Genome, Viral , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , DNA, Viral/genetics , Disease Reservoirs/virology , Genomics/methods , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing/methods , Humans , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Sequence Alignment
8.
N Engl J Med ; 382(8): 727-733, 2020 02 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-8

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, a cluster of patients with pneumonia of unknown cause was linked to a seafood wholesale market in Wuhan, China. A previously unknown betacoronavirus was discovered through the use of unbiased sequencing in samples from patients with pneumonia. Human airway epithelial cells were used to isolate a novel coronavirus, named 2019-nCoV, which formed a clade within the subgenus sarbecovirus, Orthocoronavirinae subfamily. Different from both MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV, 2019-nCoV is the seventh member of the family of coronaviruses that infect humans. Enhanced surveillance and further investigation are ongoing. (Funded by the National Key Research and Development Program of China and the National Major Project for Control and Prevention of Infectious Disease in China.).


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Adult , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/ultrastructure , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19 , Cells, Cultured , China , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Genome, Viral , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Microscopy, Electron, Transmission , Middle Aged , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Radiography, Thoracic , Respiratory System/pathology , Respiratory System/virology , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Nature ; 579(7798): 270-273, 2020 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-246

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) 18 years ago, a large number of SARS-related coronaviruses (SARSr-CoVs) have been discovered in their natural reservoir host, bats1-4. Previous studies have shown that some bat SARSr-CoVs have the potential to infect humans5-7. Here we report the identification and characterization of a new coronavirus (2019-nCoV), which caused an epidemic of acute respiratory syndrome in humans in Wuhan, China. The epidemic, which started on 12 December 2019, had caused 2,794 laboratory-confirmed infections including 80 deaths by 26 January 2020. Full-length genome sequences were obtained from five patients at an early stage of the outbreak. The sequences are almost identical and share 79.6% sequence identity to SARS-CoV. Furthermore, we show that 2019-nCoV is 96% identical at the whole-genome level to a bat coronavirus. Pairwise protein sequence analysis of seven conserved non-structural proteins domains show that this virus belongs to the species of SARSr-CoV. In addition, 2019-nCoV virus isolated from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of a critically ill patient could be neutralized by sera from several patients. Notably, we confirmed that 2019-nCoV uses the same cell entry receptor-angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE2)-as SARS-CoV.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Chiroptera/virology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/ultrastructure , COVID-19 , Cell Line , China/epidemiology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Female , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Male , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Phylogeny , SARS Virus/classification , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , Vero Cells
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