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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(24): e29238, 2022 Jun 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001496

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to explore the clinical, laboratory, and imaging features of severe Chlamydia psittaci pneumonia in order to improve early diagnosis and treatment success rates. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective record review of 14 cases of severe Chlamydia psittaci pneumonia diagnosed by metagenomic next-generation sequencing technology in our hospital. We extracted and analyzed data on the clinical symptoms and signs, contact history, laboratory investigations, chest computed tomography, treatment, and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: Of the 14 patients, 12 (86%) were male and two (14%) were female, with a mean age of 57 years (SD: 7 years). Eleven patients (79%) had a history of poultry contact. The main clinical manifestations were fever (n = 14, 100%), flu-like symptoms (n = 10, 71%), cough, sputum (n = 9, 64%), and dyspnea (n = 5, 36%). Blood tests revealed marked elevation of neutrophil percentage, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, brain natriuretic peptide, and creatine kinase levels; slight elevation of aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, urea, fibrinogen, and D-dimer levels; and decreased albumin, sodium, and calcium levels. Chest computed tomography showed bilateral lesions (n = 7, 50%), middle-lower lobe lesions (n = 10, 71%), lesions in multiple lobes (n = 9, 64%), consolidation shadows (n = 11, 79%), and pleural effusions (n = 11, 79%). The median time from disease onset to hospital admission was 4.5 days (interquartile range: 1-17 days); the mean length of hospital stay was 20.9 ±â€Š8.5 days, and the mean time from admission to diagnosis was 5.1 ±â€Š2.6 days. After diagnosis, patients were either treated with doxycycline alone or doxycycline combined with quinolones. All 14 patients developed respiratory failure and received invasive mechanical ventilation; two (14%) received veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, four (29%) received continuous renal replacement therapy, and three (21%) died. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: A poultry contact history and typical flu-like symptoms are early indicators of Chlamydia psittaci pneumonia. Substantial elevations in procalcitonin, creatine kinase, and brain natriuretic peptide indicate severe disease. Metagenomic next-generation sequencing is useful for diagnosis. Early empirical antibiotic therapy with quinolones can reduce the mortality in critically ill patients.


Subject(s)
Chlamydophila psittaci , Pneumonia , Psittacosis , Quinolones , Chlamydophila psittaci/genetics , Creatine Kinase , Doxycycline , Female , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain , Procalcitonin , Psittacosis/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies
2.
Nucleosides Nucleotides Nucleic Acids ; : 1-14, 2022 Aug 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1984880

ABSTRACT

Nucleic acid aptamers are developed from a pool of random oligonucleotide libraries with an in vitro selection through systematic evolution of ligands via exponential enrichment (SELEX) process, which are capable of specific and high-affinity molecular binding against targets. The receptor-binding domain (RBD) of spike protein from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which is involved in the early stages of viral infection, is a promising target for aptamer selection. Currently, there are no effective approaches to prevent virus from spreading. In this study, a new ssDNA aptamer RBD/S-A1 binding to the RBD of spike protein from SARS-CoV-2 with high affinity (Kd=1.74 ± 0.2 nM) and low cross-binding activity was selected and evaluated. Although aptamers targeting the RBD of spike protein from SARS-CoV-2 have been described in a handful of previous studies, the RBD/S-A1 aptamer identified in this work may be considered as a potential supplementation for the current diagnosis and research of coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.

3.
Journal of Shandong University ; 58(10):66-73, 2020.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1975293

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore the temporal and spatial distribution characteristics of confirmed cases of coronavirus disease(COVID-19)in Zhejiang Province and to determine the correlation between number of confirmed cases and geographical demographic factors, so as to provide theoretical basis for the prevention and control of COVID-19.

4.
Journal of Shandong University ; 58(10):44-52, 2020.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1975291

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze the epidemiological characteristics and incubation of coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19)from Jan. 22 to Mar. 8, 2020 in Anhui Province, in order to provide the basis for further understanding of the transmission pattern of COVID-19 and formulating regional control measures.

5.
Journal of Shandong University ; 58(10):53-59, 2020.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1975285

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore the related influence factors of coronavirus diseases 2019(COVID-19)in Shandong Province and understand the regional distribution characteristics of the epidemic situation, and to provide a scientific basis for guiding prevention and control strategies.

6.
Journal of Shandong University ; 58(10):32-37, 2020.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1975283

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore the epidemic dynamics of coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19)in Shandong Province, and to provide a scientific basis for the future prevention and control of new outbreaks of COVID-19 and other emerging infectious diseases.

7.
Journal of Shandong University ; 58(10):38-43, 2020.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1975280

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore epidemic dynamics of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Xinyang City so as to provide scientific basis for optimizing the prevention and control strategies and evaluating the effects of intervention.

8.
Computational Economics ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1935832

ABSTRACT

We use unique data on the travel history of confirmed patients at a daily frequency across 31 provinces in China to study how spatial interactions influence the geographic spread of pandemic COVID-19. We develop and simultaneously estimate a structural model of dynamic disease transmission network formation and spatial interaction. This allows us to understand what externalities the disease risk associated with a single place may create for the entire country. We find a positive and significant spatial interaction effect that strongly influences the duration and severity of pandemic COVID-19. And there exists heterogeneity in this interaction effect: the spatial spillover effect from the source province is significantly higher than from other provinces. Further counterfactual policy analysis shows that targeting the key province can improve the effectiveness of policy interventions for containing the geographic spread of pandemic COVID-19, and the effect of such targeted policy decreases with an increase in the time of delay.

9.
iScience ; 25(6): 104415, 2022 Jun 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1851360

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 outbreaks have crushed our healthcare systems, which requires clinical guidance for the healthcare following the outbreaks. We conducted retrospective cohort studies with Pearson's pattern-based analysis of clinical parameters of 248 hospitalized patients with COVID-19. We found that dysregulated neutrophil densities were correlated with hospitalization duration before death (p = 0.000066, r = -0.45 for % neutrophil; p = 0.0001, r = -0.47 for neutrophil count). As such, high neutrophil densities were associated with mortality (p = 4.23 × 10-31 for % neutrophil; p = 4.14 × 10-27 for neutrophil count). These findings were further illustrated by a representative "second week crash" pattern and validated by an independent cohort (p = 5.98 × 10-11 for % neutrophil; p = 1.65 × 10-7 for neutrophil count). By contrast, low aspartate aminotransferase (AST) or lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were correlated with quick recovery (p ≤ 0.00005). Collectively, these correlational at-admission findings may provide healthcare guidance for patients with COVID-19 in the absence of targeted therapy.

10.
Front Public Health ; 10: 808084, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753415

ABSTRACT

Background: The spread of COVID-19 poses a challenge for obstetrics and gynecology (O&G) residents. In order to improve the theoretical knowledge and practical skills of residents in epidemic prevention and control, reduce work pressure and improve professional skills, effective and sound training models are required to improve the protection of O&G residents from COVID-19. Method: A total of 38 standardized training O&G residents working in Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University in March 2020 was selected. They were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. The control group underwent a protection theory exposition according to the traditional training method, while the intervention group adopted a conceive-design-implement-operate (CDIO) mode, arranged training courses in combination with the O&G specialty, and completed four modules of CDIO. After the training, the theoretical knowledge and practical operation were assessed, and the work stress and occupational identity scales were assessed. The assessment results and scores of the two groups of residents were analyzed. Results: Compared with the scores of the residents in the control group, the theoretical and technical scores of the residents in the intervention group significantly improved (P < 0.05). In the evaluation of organizational management, workload, interpersonal relationship, and doctor-patient relationship pressure, the scores of the intervention group were lower than those of the control group, with a statistical difference (P < 0.05). For the intervention group, the job stress and professional identity evaluation scores were significantly higher than those of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The CDIO model can effectively enhance the theoretical knowledge and practical skills of O&G residents in COVID-19 epidemic prevention protocols to reduce work pressure and improve professional identity. In addition, it provides new ideas, methods, and approaches for future clinical practice training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Internship and Residency , Obstetrics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence , Gynecology/education , Humans , Obstetrics/education , Physician-Patient Relations
11.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-320228

ABSTRACT

Background: Numerous studies have been focused on the clinical and imaging features among COVID-19 patients positive for SARS-CoV-2, but the data after negative is limited. We aims to describe these features after negative respiratory nucleic acid testing results.Methods From January 31 to February 28, 2020, 51 mild-to-moderate COVID-19 cases (median: 34.0 years and 47.1% male) were retrospectively enrolled. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and CT imaging data were collected before and after two sequential negative results for respiratory SARS-CoV-2 .Results After negative for respiratory SARS-CoV-2, the clinical symptoms continued to recover and the abnormal imaging were observed for all of the moderate cases. 77.4% of the moderate patients had multi-lobar involvement and lesions were more frequent in the lower lobes. The most common CT imaging manifestations were ground glass opacity (51.6%) and fibrous stripes (54.8%%). Among 12 out of 31 moderate patients with repeated chest CT scan after negative for SARS-CoV-2, 7 patients (58.3%) with ground-glass absorption reduced over 60% within one week, but there were still 4 cases (13.8%) with absorption less than 5%.Conclusions The clinical symptoms and abnormal imaging persisted but continued to recover after negative for respiratory SARS-CoV-2.

12.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315212

ABSTRACT

Background: Multiorgan damage by SARS-CoV-2 results in alterations of many clinical measures associated with mortality of COVID-19. This research discussed the pioneering pathogenicity factors that lead to the extensive damage elusive. Objectives: A cohort of COVID-19 patients. Methods: : We conducted a correlational analysis of hospital outcomes with an independent cohort of COVID-19 patients and we also presented a death case to illustrate for time course of immune cell density. Results: : The results showed that dysregulated immune cell densities were correlated with hospitalization duration before death, not before discharge. High neutrophil densities allowed sorting out one third of total death cases while a density of less than 70% of the white blood cells allowed sorting out 70% of surviving cases. Conclusion: Collectively surged neutrophil was a top trigger for mortality in patients with COVID-19.

13.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315211

ABSTRACT

Background: Worldwide spread of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has made hundreds of thousands people sick and fortunately many of them have been treated and discharged. However, it remains unclear how well the discharged patients were recovering. Chest CT scan, with demonstrated high sensitivity to COVID-19, was used here to examine clinical manifestations in patients at discharge. Methods: This study registered retrospectively single-center case series of 180 discharged patients, all confirmed with COVID-19 at Wuhan Red Cross Hospital in Wuhan, China. Epidemiological, demographic, clinical, laboratory and treatment data were collected. CT imaging features of absorption vs progressive stage were compared and analyzed. Results: Five pulmonary lobes were affected in 54 (30%) of the 180 patients at the absorption stage, comparing to 66% of them at the progressive stage ( P=1.45×10 -11 ). Forty five (25%) patients had pleural effusion on admission and 13 of them still carried hydrothorax when discharged as per standard discharge criteria( P=4.48×10 -6 ). Besides, compared with those at progressive stage, 97 (54%) discharged patients had interlobular thickening ( P=6.95×10 -3 ) and 43% of them still presented adjacent pleura thickening ( P=5.58×10 -5 ). The median total CT score of discharged patients at absorption stage was lower than progressive stage (3 vs 12.5 ). The median total CT score recovery rate was 67% (range, 0-100%) and 139 (77%) patients showed less than 90% improvement at discharge. Conclusions: A majority (77%) of the discharged patients had not recovered completely. The current discharge criteria may need to include 90% or higher CT score-based recovery rate.Authors Jingwen Li, Xi Long, Fang Fang, and Xuefei Lv contributed equally to this work.Authors Zhicheng Lin and Nian Xiong are joint last coauthors.

14.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315167

ABSTRACT

Background: New coronavirus disease (COVID-19), an infectious disease caused by a type of novel coronavirus, has emerged in various countries since the end of 2019 and caused a global pandemic. Many infected people went undetected because their symptoms were mild or asymptomatic, but the proportion and infectivity of asymptomatic infections remained unknown. Therefore, in this paper, we analyzed the proportion and infectivity of asymptomatic cases, as we as the prevalence of COVID-19 in Henan province. Methods We constructed SEAIUHR model based on COVID-19 cases reported from 21 January to 26 February 2020 in Henan province to estimate the proportion and infectivity of asymptomatic cases, as we as the change of effective reproductive number, \({R}_{t}\). At the same time, we simulated the changes of cases in different scenarios by changing the time and intensity of the implementation of prevention and control measures. Results The proportion of asymptomatic cases among COVID-19 infected individuals was 42% and infectivity of asymptomatic cases was 10% of that symptomatic ones. The basic reproductive number\({R}_{0}\)=2.73, and \({R}_{t}\) dropped below 1 on 1 February under a series of measures. If measures were taken five days earlier, the number of cases would be reduced by 2/3, and after 5 days the number would more than triple. Conclusions In Henan Province, the COVID-19 epidemic spread rapidly in the early stage, and there were a large number of asymptomatic infected individuals with relatively low infectivity. However, the epidemic was quickly brought under control with national measures, and the earlier measures were implemented, the better.

15.
Nat Hum Behav ; 6(1): 55-63, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1541210

ABSTRACT

The effects of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) public health policies on non-COVID-19-related mortality are unclear. Here, using death registries based on 300 million Chinese people and a difference-in-differences design, we find that China's strict anti-contagion policies during the COVID-19 pandemic significantly reduced non-COVID-19 mortality outside Wuhan (by 4.6%). The health benefits persisted and became even greater after the measures were loosened: mortality was reduced by 12.5% in the medium term. Significant changes in people's behaviours (for example, wearing masks and practising social distancing) and reductions in air pollution and traffic accidents could have driven these results. We estimate that 54,000 lives could have been saved from non-COVID-19 causes during the 50 days of strict policies and 293,000 in the subsequent 115 days. The results suggest that virus countermeasures not only effectively controlled COVID-19 in China but also brought about unintended and substantial public health benefits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Mortality/trends , Neoplasms/mortality , Respiratory Tract Infections/mortality , Wounds and Injuries/mortality , Accidents, Traffic/trends , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Air Pollution/statistics & numerical data , Cause of Death , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Masks , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Public Health , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
16.
Pol J Microbiol ; 70(3): 401-404, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441450

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 was found in a recovered patient's stool specimen by combining quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) and genome sequencing. The patient was virus positive in stool specimens for at least an additional 15 days after he was recovered, whereas respiratory tract specimens were negative. The discovery of the complete genome of SARS-CoV-2 in the stool sample of the recovered patient demonstrates a cautionary warning that the potential mode of the virus transmission cannot be excluded through the fecal-oral route after viral clearance in the respiratory tract.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Convalescence , Feces/virology , Genome, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Whole Genome Sequencing , Adult , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/transmission , China , Cough/virology , Fever/virology , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
17.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e048611, 2021 09 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435049

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To develop a virtual reality simulation training programme, and further verify the effect of the programme on improving the response capacity of emergency reserve nurses confronting public health emergencies. DESIGN: A prospective quasiexperimental design with a control group. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 120 nurses were recruited and randomly divided into the control group and the intervention group. INTERVENTION: Participants underwent a 3-month training. The control group received the conventional training of emergency response (eg, theoretical lectures, technical skills and psychological training), while the intervention group underwent the virtual reality simulation training in combination with skills training. The COVID-19 cases were incorporated into the intervention group training, and the psychological training was identical to both groups. At the end of the training, each group conducted emergency drills twice. Before and after the intervention, the two groups were assessed for the knowledge and technical skills regarding responses to fulminate respiratory infectious diseases, as well as the capacity of emergency care. Furthermore, their pandemic preparedness was assessed with a disaster preparedness questionnaire. RESULTS: After the intervention, the scores of the relevant knowledge, the capacity of emergency care and disaster preparedness in the intervention group significantly increased (p<0.01). The score of technical skills in the control group increased more significantly than that of the intervention group (p<0.01). No significant difference was identified in the scores of postdisaster management in two groups (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: The virtual reality simulation training in combination with technical skills training can improve the response capacity of emergency reserve nurses as compared with the conventional training. The findings of the study provide some evidence for the emergency training of reserve nurses in better response to public health emergencies and suggest this methodology is worthy of further research and popularisation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses, Public Health , Simulation Training , Virtual Reality , China , Clinical Competence , Emergencies , Humans , Prospective Studies , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 591372, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304597

ABSTRACT

Background: Novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2), is now sweeping across the world. A substantial proportion of infections only lead to mild symptoms or are asymptomatic, but the proportion and infectivity of asymptomatic infections remains unknown. In this paper, we proposed a model to estimate the proportion and infectivity of asymptomatic cases, using COVID-19 in Henan Province, China, as an example. Methods: We extended the conventional susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered model by including asymptomatic, unconfirmed symptomatic, and quarantined cases. Based on this model, we used daily reported COVID-19 cases from January 21 to February 26, 2020, in Henan Province to estimate the proportion and infectivity of asymptomatic cases, as well as the change of effective reproductive number, R t . Results: The proportion of asymptomatic cases among COVID-19 infected individuals was 42% and the infectivity was 10% that of symptomatic ones. The basic reproductive number R 0 = 2.73, and R t dropped below 1 on January 31 under a series of measures. Conclusion: The spread of the COVID-19 epidemic was rapid in the early stage, with a large number of asymptomatic infected individuals having relatively low infectivity. However, it was quickly brought under control with national measures.

19.
Sci Robot ; 6(52)2021 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209822

ABSTRACT

The world was unprepared for the COVID-19 pandemic, and recovery is likely to be a long process. Robots have long been heralded to take on dangerous, dull, and dirty jobs, often in environments that are unsuitable for humans. Could robots be used to fight future pandemics? We review the fundamental requirements for robotics for infectious disease management and outline how robotic technologies can be used in different scenarios, including disease prevention and monitoring, clinical care, laboratory automation, logistics, and maintenance of socioeconomic activities. We also address some of the open challenges for developing advanced robots that are application oriented, reliable, safe, and rapidly deployable when needed. Last, we look at the ethical use of robots and call for globally sustained efforts in order for robots to be ready for future outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control/trends , Communicable Diseases , Robotics/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Diseases/diagnosis , Communicable Diseases/therapy , Disinfection/trends , Humans , Machine Learning , Pandemics/prevention & control , Remote Sensing Technology/trends , Robotic Surgical Procedures/trends , Robotics/instrumentation , SARS-CoV-2 , User-Computer Interface
20.
J Med Virol ; 93(1): 448-455, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196394

ABSTRACT

This study investigates the clinical and imaging characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with false-negative nucleic acids. Mild-to-moderate COVID-19 patients, including 19 cases of nucleic acid false-negative patients and 31 cases of nucleic acid positive patients, were enrolled. Their epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory examination data and imaging characteristics were analyzed. Risk factors for false negatives were discussed. Compared with the nucleic acid positive group, the false-negative group had less epidemiological exposure (52.6% vs 83.9%; P = .025), less chest discomfort (5.3% vs 32.3%; P = .035), and faster recovery (10 [8, 13] vs 15 [11, 18.5] days; P = .005). The number of involved lung lobes was (2 [1, 2.5] vs 3 [2, 4] days; P = .004), and the lung damage severity score was (3 [2.5, 4.5] vs 5 [4, 9] days; P = .007), which was lighter in the nucleic acid false-negative group. Thus, the absence of epidemiological exposure may be a potential risk factor for false-negative nucleic acids. The false-negative cases of COVID-19 are worth noting because they have a risk of viral transmission without positive test results, lighter clinical manifestations, and less history of epidemiological exposure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , False Negative Reactions , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Male , RNA, Viral/blood , Risk Factors , Young Adult
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