Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 58
Filter
1.
Infect Drug Resist ; 14: 4237-4247, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1817631

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is ravaging the world. To date, there are no standard therapies available to cure the disease. Consequently, research on COVID-19 vaccines is booming. This report aimed to assess the research trends of the global COVID-19 vaccines. METHODS: The relevant publications on the COVID-19 vaccines were searched in the Web of Science Core Collection Database (WOSCC) database from December 2019 to 11 August 2021. The VOSviewer1.6.16 was used to assess the co-authorship, co-occurrence, citation of countries, institutions, authors, journals, and hotspot keywords. The HistCiteTM (http://www.histcite.com/) software was used to calculate the total local citation score (TLCS) and total global citation score (TGCS) of each variable and generate the citation historiography graph of COVID-19 vaccine development using the citation time series analysis method. RESULTS: A total of 5070 studies authored by 21,151 researchers and published by 1364 different journals were eventually included in this study. The bulk of the retrieved studies were original articles (n = 2401, 47.36%). Among these studies, 1204 (23.75%) were published in 2020. A total of 3863 (76.19%) were published in 2021 and 4295 (84.71%) were open access. The highest number of studies was conducted in the USA, followed by England, China, and Germany. The main partners of the USA were China, England, and Canada. The University of Maryland (TLCS: 1618, TGCS: 2991) and Prof. Ugur Sahin from the University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University (TLCS: 1397, TGCS: 2407) were the most cited institution and author, respectively. The vaccines featured the highest number of papers, with 294 publications (TLCS: 0, TGCS: 1226). The most cited journal was the New England Journal of Medicine (TLCS: 3310, TGCS: 5914), with an impact factor (IF) of 91.245. The related topics included the following six aspects: attitudes towards vaccination, immunoinformatics analysis, clinical research, effectiveness and side effects, and the public management of vaccines. The timing diagram revealed that the research hotspots focused on the side effects of vaccines and public attitude towards vaccination. CONCLUSION: This novel comprehensive bibliometric analysis can help researchers and non-researchers to rapidly identify the potential partners, landmark studies, and research topics within their domains of interest. Through this study, we hope to provide more data to combat the COVID-19 pandemic.

2.
Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment ; : 103285, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1799685

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic severely hampered the freedom of shopping travel while increasing individuals’ interest in takeout. Although many studies have examined takeout shopping, the available literature provides insufficient evidence on the factors influencing takeout shopping demand under the COVID-19. In this study, generalized additive mixed models were developed based on sampling data of takeout orders in Nanjing before, during, and post the pandemic to measure the associations between takeout shopping demand and neighborhood characteristics at the business circle scale. The results show that population density, house prices, road density, and catering all have a significant impact on takeout shopping demand, while the roles of land use (residential and company indexes) before and post the pandemic are opposite. Besides, the factors influencing the recovery of the demand before and after the pandemic were analyzed. These findings provide important insights into the development of the takeout industry in the post-pandemic era.

4.
BenchCouncil Transactions on Benchmarks, Standards and Evaluations ; : 100037, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1783771

ABSTRACT

AI technology has been used in many clinical research fields, but most AI technologies are difficult to land in real-world clinical settings. In most current clinical AI research settings, the diagnosis task is to identify different types of diseases among the given ones. However, the diagnosis in real-world settings needs dynamically developing inspection strategies based on the existing resources of medical institutions and identifying different kinds of diseases out of many possibilities. To promote the development of different clinical AI technologies and the implementation of clinical applications, we propose a benchmark named Clinical AIBench for developing, verifying, and evaluating clinical AI technologies in real-world clinical settings. Specifically, Clinical AIBench can be used for: (1) Model training and testing: Researchers can use the data to train and test their models. (2)Model evaluation: Researchers can use Clinical AIBench to objectively, fairly, and comparably evaluate various models of different researchers. (3) Clinical value evaluation: Researchers can use the clinical indicators provided by Clinical AIBench to evaluate the clinical value of models, which will be applied in real-world clinical settings. For convenience, Clinical AIBench provides three different levels of clinical settings: restricted clinical setting, which is named closed clinical setting, data island clinical setting, and real-world clinical setting, which is called open clinical setting. In addition, Clinical AIBench covers three diseases: Alzheimer’s disease, COVID-19, and dental. Clinical AIBench provides python APIs to researchers. The data and source code are publicly available from the project website https://www.benchcouncil.org/clinical_aibench/.

5.
Aging Ment Health ; : 1-7, 2022 Mar 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740626

ABSTRACT

Objective: Older adults' well-being may suffer due to prolonged social isolation leading to loneliness and increased stress during the COVID-19 pandemic. The current study aimed to address the role of benefit-finding, defined as the capacity to derive meaning and positive aspects from stressful situations, in late midlife and older adults' adaptation to the effects of home confinement and centralized quarantine (HCCQ).Methods: 421 participants aged 50 or above in mainland of China participated in an online survey to study the effects of HCCQ on loneliness, stress, anxiety, depression and life satisfaction, as well as the moderating role of benefit-finding.Results: Correlational analysis showed that a history of HCCQ was basically unrelated to any outcome. However, the effect actually varied by levels of benefit-finding. Among late midlife and older people with lower benefit-finding, those who had experienced HCCQ reported more loneliness, perceived stress, as well as more anxiety and depressive symptoms; no such relationships were found when benefit-finding was moderate or high.Conclusion: The findings extended our understanding of the role of benefit-finding in buffering the negative impact of adversity. By mitigating the effects of prolonged social isolation, benefit-finding served as a protective factor in late midlife and older people's adaptation to the sequelae of this pandemic.

6.
Ann Palliat Med ; 11(2): 544-550, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1727123

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Under the current epidemic of the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19), there is a need to distinguish the differences between the laboratory examinations of COVID-19-infected patients, tumor patients with fever, and those with normal fever patients. We aimed to investigate the temperature of tumor patients with different tumor burdens, stages, and cancer types. METHODS: We recruited 3 groups of patients to this study: fever patients with malignant tumors, ordinary fever patients, and confirmed cases of COVID-19, with 31, 55, and 28 cases in each group, respectively. RESULTS: The levels of leukocytes and neutrophils were the highest among non-tumor patients, and the count of COVID-19 was the lowest, with a P value of 0.000. Among the leukocytosis group, non-tumor patients had the highest proportion (43.6%), while that of COVID-19 was only 3.6% (P=0.000). Similarly, there were significant differences in the grading of neutrophils, where most of the infected patients were in the normal group and the P value was 0.000. The lymphocyte count of the tumor group was significantly reduced, with an average of (0.97±0.66) ×109/L (P=0.004). In the lymphocyte grades, most of the infected patients were the normal group (71.4%), while tumor patients in the lymphocytopenia group accounted for 63.1% (P=0.006). There were also significant differences in the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) (P=0.006). There was a significant difference in temperature between different tumor burden groups (P=0.014). CONCLUSIONS: The normal fever group had the highest count of leukocyte and neutrophils, whereas the infected group had the lowest relative count. The NLR was the lowest in the infected group. The NLR was higher in the bigger tumor load group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Lymphocytes , Neoplasms/complications , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-324274

ABSTRACT

Background: The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is a public health emergency of international concern. This study aimed to assess the psychological outcomes and their influencing factors among medical and non-medical university students during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. Methods: : A cross-sectional online survey using structured questionnaires was conducted from 20 February to 20 March 2020. Psychological outcomes were assessed according to the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Influencing factors were assessed by COVID-19 knowledge, mindful coping scale, and sense of control scale. Results: : Our sample comprises of 563 university students (male = 172, mean age = 21.52). Among them, 382 are medical students. Among the participants, 12.26%, 18.47%, and 8.53% of them have moderate to severe levels of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, respectively. Compared with the non-medical students, the medical students had a higher knowledge level of COVID-19, a higher sense of awareness, and fewer mental health symptoms. After controlling the covariance, perceived constrains of sense of control were negatively associated with depression, anxiety, and stress among both medical and non-medical students. Prevention of negative emotions by mindful coping was negatively associated with depression and anxiety among non-medical students. Knowledge of COVID-19 is not associated with mental distress among medical and non-medical students. Conclusions: : During the COVID-19 pandemic in China, the mental health of university students was affected. Our findings suggested that a sense of control is a protective factor for both medical and non-medical students, while mindful coping is a protective factor for only non-medical students.

8.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323884

ABSTRACT

The Corona virus has been raging on across the world affecting hundreds of countries and billions of people. Naturally, it has had huge impacts on the world economy as a whole and the lives of people. This study aims to find out the effects that the COVID-19 has had on social economy and sustainability. The study takes up the primary aspects of social well-being like Poverty, Employment, The Condition of Women, Global Trade and Food Security and tries to find out the impact that the pandemic had on them. Analysing secondary data and reports from major international organisations like the United Nations and World Bank, this paper concludes that the effects of the pandemic have been huge. All the major aspects of the social economy have been affected by the pandemic and have resulted in huge losses in terms of economic well-being and social capital.

9.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-312582

ABSTRACT

Background: Health care workers (HCWs) fighting Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) are not immune to fatigue. Self-efficacy has been suggested as a protective factor for fatigue. Nonetheless, less is known regarding the underlying mechanisms behind the association. This research aimed to explore the prevalence of fatigue among HCWs during the pandemic, investigate the mediating effect of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and moderating effect of negative coping in the association between self-efficacy and fatigue.Methods. The cross-sectional study employed a sample of 527 HCWs from Anhui Province, China. Self-efficacy, PTSD symptoms, negative coping and fatigue were measured by General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C), Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (CSCQ) and 14-item Fatigue Scale (FS-14) respectively.Results. The prevalence of fatigue among HCWs was 56.7%. The effect of self-efficacy on fatigue was partially mediated by PTSD symptoms. Additionally, negative coping moderated both the direct effect of self-efficacy on fatigue and the mediating effect of PTSD symptoms. As revealed by Johnson-Neyman technique, when the standard score of negative coping enhanced to 1.49 and over, the direct association between self-efficacy and fatigue was not significant. Likewise, the effect of self-efficacy on PTSD symptoms had no statistical significance when the standard score of negative coping was − 1.40 and lower.Conclusions. More than half HCWs suffer from fatigue during the COVID-19. For HCWs during the COVID-19 epidemic, especially those with higher levels of negative coping, it might be crucial to design program combining the enhancement of self-efficacy and interventions for PTSD to reduce fatigue.

10.
Res Vet Sci ; 145: 46-49, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671110

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by an infectious virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), poses a threat to the world. The suitable treatments must be identified for this disease in animals. Nanobody have therapeutic potential in the COVID-19. In this study, SARS-CoV-2 Spike RBD protein was used to make the nanobody. Nanobodies binding to the SARS-CoV-2 Spike RBD protein was obtained. Interestingly, the nanobody could bind to SARS-CoV-2 Spike S protein and RBD protein at the same time. Nanobodies were validated with a neutralizing antibody detection kit. The use of pseudoviruses confirmed that nanobodies could prevent pseudoviruses from infecting cells. We believe the nanobody are very valuable and could be used in the treatment of COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 nanobodies can be rapidly mass-produced from microorganisms to block SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro and in vivo with preventive and therapeutic effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/veterinary , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
11.
Sens Actuators B Chem ; 358: 131460, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655165

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a highly diffuse respiratory infection caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Currently, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) technology is commonly used in clinical diagnosis of COVID-19. However, this method is time-consuming and labor-intensive, which is limited in clinical application. Here, we propose a new method for the ultrasensitive and visual detection of SARS-CoV-2 viral nucleic acid. The assay integrates with a paper device and highly efficient isothermal amplification technology - Netlike rolling circle amplification (NRCA), which can reach a limit of detection of 4.12 aM. The paper-based NRCA owns advantages of specificity, portability, visualization and low-cost. Therefore, this method can effectively meet the requirements of point-of-care testing, providing a novel molecular detection technology for clinical diagnosis of COVID-19 and promoting the development of NRCA devices.

12.
Remote Sensing ; 14(3):559, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1650589

ABSTRACT

Population growth, climate change, and the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic are imposing increasing pressure on global agricultural production. The challenge of increasing crop yield while ensuring sustainable development of environmentally friendly agriculture is a common issue throughout the world. Autonomous systems, sensing technologies, and artificial intelligence offer great opportunities to tackle this issue. In precision agriculture (PA), non-destructive and non-invasive remote and proximal sensing methods have been widely used to observe crops in visible and invisible spectra. Nowadays, the integration of high-performance imagery sensors (e.g., RGB, multispectral, hyperspectral, thermal, and SAR) and unmanned mobile platforms (e.g., satellites, UAVs, and terrestrial agricultural robots) are yielding a huge number of high-resolution farmland images, in which rich crop information is compressed. However, this has been accompanied by challenges, i.e., ways to swiftly and efficiently making full use of these images, and then, to perform fine crop management based on information-supported decision making. In the past few years, deep learning (DL) has shown great potential to reshape many industries because of its powerful capabilities of feature learning from massive datasets, and the agriculture industry is no exception. More and more agricultural scientists are paying attention to applications of deep learning in image-based farmland observations, such as land mapping, crop classification, biotic/abiotic stress monitoring, and yield prediction. To provide an update on these studies, we conducted a comprehensive investigation with a special emphasis on deep learning in multiscale agricultural remote and proximal sensing. Specifically, the applications of convolutional neural network-based supervised learning (CNN-SL), transfer learning (TL), and few-shot learning (FSL) in crop sensing at land, field, canopy, and leaf scales are the focus of this review. We hope that this work can act as a reference for the global agricultural community regarding DL in PA and can inspire deeper and broader research to promote the evolution of modern agriculture.

13.
Nat Med ; 26(6): 845-848, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1641979

ABSTRACT

We report acute antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 in 285 patients with COVID-19. Within 19 days after symptom onset, 100% of patients tested positive for antiviral immunoglobulin-G (IgG). Seroconversion for IgG and IgM occurred simultaneously or sequentially. Both IgG and IgM titers plateaued within 6 days after seroconversion. Serological testing may be helpful for the diagnosis of suspected patients with negative RT-PCR results and for the identification of asymptomatic infections.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibody Formation/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Antibody Formation/immunology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Acta Pharmacol Sin ; 2022 Jan 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639468

ABSTRACT

Colchicine is an ancient herbal drug derived from Colchicum autumnale. It was first used to treat familial Mediterranean fever and gout. Based on its unique efficacy as an anti-inflammatory agent, colchicine has been used in the therapy of cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis, recurrent pericarditis, vascular restenosis, heart failure, and myocardial infarction. More recently, colchicine has also shown therapeutic efficacy in alleviating cardiovascular complications of COVID-19. COLCOT and LoDoCo2 are two milestone clinical trials that confirm the curative effect of long-term administration of colchicine in reducing the incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease. There is growing interest in studying the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of colchicine. The anti-inflammatory action of colchicine is mediated mainly through inhibiting the assembly of microtubules. At the cellular level, colchicine inhibits the following: (1) endothelial cell dysfunction and inflammation; (2) smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration; (3) macrophage chemotaxis, migration, and adhesion; (4) platelet activation. At the molecular level, colchicine reduces proinflammatory cytokine release and inhibits NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In this review, we summarize the current clinical trials with proven curative effect of colchicine in treating cardiovascular diseases. We also systematically discuss the mechanisms of colchicine action in cardiovascular therapeutics. Altogether, colchicine, a bioactive constituent from an ancient medicinal herb, exerts unique anti-inflammatory effects and prominent cardiovascular actions, and will charter a new page in cardiovascular medicine.

15.
Innovation in Aging ; 5(Supplement_1):722-722, 2021.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1584428
16.
J Clin Transl Endocrinol Case Rep ; 23: 100104, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587295

ABSTRACT

The virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic continues to pose unmatched challenges in the world. It can cause systemic inflammation, which can lead to multiorgan involvement and subsequent damage. The relationship that possibly exists between the COVID-19 infection, the newly developed vaccines, and thyroid disease are still under extensive investigation. We are reporting the first case of new-onset graves' disease in a young, healthy man after COVID-19 infection and receiving a COVID-19 vaccine dose.

17.
Am J Perinatol ; 2021 Dec 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545708

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic-related changes in the antenatal utilization of high-risk obstetric services. Our secondary objective was to characterize change in stillbirth rate during the pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: This is a retrospective, observational study performed at a single, tertiary care center. Maternal-Fetal Medicine (MFM) visits, ultrasounds, and antenatal tests of fetal well-being during the pandemic epoch (2020), which spans the first 12 weeks of the year to include pandemic onset and implementation of mitigation efforts, were compared with the same epoch of the three preceding years visually and using general linear models to account for week and year effect. An analysis of stillbirth rate comparing the pandemic time period to prepandemic was also performed. RESULTS: While there were decreased MFM visits and antenatal tests of fetal well-being during the pandemic epoch compared with prepandemic epochs, only the decrease in MFM visits by year was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The stillbirth rate during the pandemic epoch was not significantly different when compared with the prepandemic period and accounting for both week (p = 0.286) and year (p = 0.643) effect. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a significant decrease in MFM visits, whereas obstetric ultrasounds and antenatal tests of fetal well-being remained unchanged. While we observed no change in the stillbirth rate compared with the prepandemic epoch, our study design and sample size preclude us from making assumptions of association. Our findings may support future work investigating how changes in prenatal care for high-risk obstetric patients influence perinatal outcomes. KEY POINTS: · MFM visits significantly decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic epoch.. · The overall stillbirth rate during the COVID-19 pandemic epoch was not significantly changed.. · Larger studies are needed to capitalize on these changes to evaluate rare outcomes such as stillbirth..

19.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(42): e27512, 2021 Oct 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480011

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To analyze the epidemiological characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) clusters in Hainan, and to provide a basis for the prevention and control of disease clusters.Descriptive epidemiology was used to retrospectively analyze the characteristics of disease clusters in 168 cases of COVID-19.Of the 168 COVID-19 cases, 99 (58.93%) comprised 29 clusters, 22 (75.86%) of which were imported and included 63 cases (63.64%), while 7 clusters (24.14%) were local and included 36 cases (36.36%). Of the cluster cases, 49 were men (49.49%) and 50 were women (50.50%), the median age was 52 years, and the maximum number of cases from 41 to 60 was at 37 years (37.37%). There were 67 first generation cases (67.68%), 28 (28.28%) second generation, and 4 (4.04%) third generation. Of the clusters, 68.97% occurred from January 31 to February 7, with the highest peak on February 6. The local disease clusters occurred with a time lag. The 2 cities with the most reported incidents were Sanya (10 cases, 34.48%) and Haikou (5 cases, 17.24%). Family clusters were most frequent, with 18 clusters (62.07%) involving 62 cases (62.63%), followed by social clusters, with 3 clusters (10.34%). The most complex clusters involved 3 cluster types (family, travel, and community). There was a statistically significant difference in the infectivity of the imported clusters versus the local clusters, with imported clusters being lower (Z = -2.851, P = .004). The infectivity of all cases or family members was highest in Haikou and lowest in Sanya. The infectivity of all cases with an incubation period of ≤7 days was 1.53 ±â€Š1.01, in which the infectivity of family members was 1.29 ±â€Š1.10. The infectivity of all cases with an incubation period of ≤14 days was 1.89 ±â€Š1.23, in which the infectivity of family members was 1.43 ±â€Š1.37.COVID-19 clusters in Hainan mainly occurred in families, and local clusters had high infectivity. Therefore, key populations and regions should be monitored, and targeted preventive measures should be carried out to provide a reference for the prevention and control of disease clusters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Hotspot , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
20.
Int J Gen Med ; 14: 4677-4685, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416994

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Most studies that examined the relationship between internet use and sleep were conducted mainly in children and adolescents, and we know little about the use of internet among adults. The purpose of this study is to understand the internet use patterns of Chinese adults and to measure their associations with sleep duration from variety, frequency and type. METHODS: A total of 19,730 samples were selected from 2018 data of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal study. Internet usage was obtained by specific questions, and the range of sleep period was grouped according to recommendations from the National Sleep Foundation. Kruskal-Wallis H-test and the chi-squared test were used for basic descriptive analysis, and multinomial logistic regression was used to analyze the relationships between internet use and sleep duration. Stata version 15.0 was used for data cleaning, and SPSS version 20.0 was used for statistics analysis. RESULTS: After screening, a total of 6346 persons were included in the analysis, of which 3148 (49.61%) were males and 3198 (50.39%) were females. Age ranged from 21 to 95 years, most persons were over 45 years old, with the median age of 56 years. Only 1180 (18.59%) participants used the internet, and almost all of them used mobile phones (1137, 96.36%), the other three types were desktop computer (232, 19.66%), laptop computer (69, 5.85%) and tablet (73, 6.19%). There were 912 (77.28%) and 268 (22.71%) participants who used only one and two or more types, respectively. In the unadjusted model, both short sleep and long sleep were associated with internet use compared with normal sleep duration (0.806 [0.708-0.918] p = 0.001; 0.345 [0.251-0.475] p < 0.000). After adjusting for all covariates, the association between long sleep and internet use still persisted (0.612 [0.433-0.865] p = 0.005), but no significant difference was found in short sleep (0.929 [0.803-1.075] p = 0.325). CONCLUSION: Internet use was found to be closely associated with sleep and the duration of sleep negatively affected, which may provide new ideas for sleep hygiene recommendations and healthy media use. This conclusion needs more evidence to support.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL