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1.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 633767, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241166

ABSTRACT

Background: Although hyperuricemia frequently associates with respiratory diseases, patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) can show marked hypouricemia. Previous studies on the association of serum uric acid with risk of adverse outcomes related to COVID-19 have produced contradictory results. The precise relationship between admission serum uric acid and adverse outcomes in hospitalized patients is unknown. Methods: Data of patients affected by laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and admitted to Leishenshan Hospital were retrospectively analyzed. The primary outcome was composite and comprised events, such as intensive care unit (ICU) admission, mechanical ventilation, or mortality. Logistic regression analysis was performed to explore the association between serum concentrations of uric acid and the composite outcome, as well as each of its components. To determine the association between serum uric acid and in-hospital adverse outcomes, serum uric acid was also categorized by restricted cubic spline, and the 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to estimate odds ratios (OR). Results: The study cohort included 1854 patients (mean age, 58 years; 52% women). The overall mean ± SD of serum levels of uric acid was 308 ± 96 µmol/L. Among them, 95 patients were admitted to ICU, 75 patients received mechanical ventilation, and 38 died. In total, 114 patients reached composite end-points (have either ICU admission, mechanical ventilation or death) during hospitalization. Compared with a reference group with estimated baseline serum uric acid of 279-422 µmol/L, serum uric acid values ≥ 423 µmol/L were associated with an increased risk of composite outcome (OR, 2.60; 95% CI, 1.07- 6.29) and mechanical ventilation (OR, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.06- 8.51). Serum uric acid ≤ 278 µmol/L was associated with an increased risk of the composite outcome (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.18- 3.65), ICU admission (OR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.17- 4.05]), and mechanical ventilation (OR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.06- 4.28), as assessed by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This study shows that the association between admission serum uric acid and composite outcome of COVID-19 patients was U-shaped. In particular, we found that compared with baseline serum uric acid levels of 279-422 µmol/L, values ≥ 423 µmol/L were associated with an increased risk of composite outcome and mechanical ventilation, whereas levels ≤ 278 µmol/L associated with increased risk of composite outcome, ICU admission and mechanical ventilation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Uric Acid/blood , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Survival Rate
2.
Comput Struct Biotechnol J ; 19: 1694-1700, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144573

ABSTRACT

Background: To investigate and select the useful prognostic parameters to develop and validate a model to predict the mortality risk for severely and critically ill patients with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Methods: We established a retrospective cohort of patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 (≥18 years old) from two tertiary hospitals: the People's Hospital of Wuhan University and Leishenshan Hospital between February 16, 2020, and April 14, 2020. The diagnosis of the cases was confirmed according to the WHO interim guidance. The data of consecutive severely and critically ill patients with COVID-19 admitted to these hospitals were analyzed. A total of 566 patients from the People's Hospital of Wuhan University were included in the training cohort and 436 patients from Leishenshan Hospital were included in the validation cohort. The least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) and multivariable logistic regression were used to select the variables and build the mortality risk prediction model. Results: The prediction model was presented as a nomograph and developed based on identified predictors, including age, chronic lung disease, C-reactive protein (CRP), D-dimer levels, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), creatinine, and total bilirubin. In the training cohort, the model displayed good discrimination with an AUC of 0.912 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.884-0.940] and good calibration (intercept = 0; slope = 1). In the validation cohort, the model had an AUC of 0.922 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.891-0.953] and a good calibration (intercept = 0.056; slope = 1.161). The decision curve analysis (DCA) demonstrated that the nomogram was clinically useful. Conclusion: A risk score for severely and critically ill COVID-19 patients' mortality was developed and externally validated. This model can help clinicians to identify individual patients at a high mortality risk.

3.
Front Neurol ; 11: 625272, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1063345

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) broke out in Wuhan, China, in late December 2019 and has since spread rapidly around the world. Severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia patients have abnormal blood coagulation function, but their thromboembolism prevalence is still unknown. We reported a case of a 49-year-old man infected with COVID-19, presenting with fever, chest pain, limb weakness, myalgia, and dyspnea. The patient was diagnosed with severe COVID-19 pneumonia, pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE), deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and cerebral infarction. He received supportive and empirical treatment including anticoagulant treatment, anti-inflammatory treatment, oxygen supply, and inhalation therapy. The patient's symptoms, CT images, and laboratory results improved after treatment, and a throat swab was reported to be negative for SARS-CoV-2 virus by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. However, on day 51 of illness onset, CT reexamination demonstrated hemorrhagic infarction. Anticoagulant therapy was discontinued temporarily. After the patient tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 virus by PCR test six more times, he was discharged and remained in home quarantine. This case highlights the importance of clinician attentiveness to the appearance of multiple thromboembolism, especially in patients with severe pulmonary damage. It also emphasizes the diagnostic value of early CT imaging and the need for effective treatment once thrombotic events occur.

4.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 662, 2020 Sep 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-751233

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) that was firstly reported in Wuhan, China, with cases now confirmed in more than 100 countries. However, COVID-19 pneumonia with spontaneous pneumothorax is unknown. CASE PRESENTATION: We reported a case of 66-year-old man infected with COVID-19, presenting with fever, cough and myalgia; The patient received supportive and empirical treatment including antiviral treatment, anti-inflammatory treatment, oxygen supply and inhalation therapy; The symptoms, CT images, laboratory results got improved after the treatments, and a throat swab was negative for COVID-19 PCR test; However, on the hospital day 30, the patient presented with a sudden chest pain and dyspnea. CT showed a 30-40% left-sided pneumothorax. Immediate thoracic closed drainage was performed and his dyspnea was rapidly improved. With five more times negative PCR tests for SARS-CoV-2 virus, the patient was discharged and home quarantine. CONCLUSION: This case highlights the importance for clinicians to pay attention to the appearance of spontaneous pneumothorax, especially patients with severe pulmonary damage for a long course, as well as the need for early image diagnose CT and effective treatment once pneumothorax occurs.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumothorax/complications , Aged , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Chest Pain/complications , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cough/complications , Drainage , Dyspnea/complications , Fever/complications , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pneumothorax/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Med Virol ; 92(7): 833-840, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-164692

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), emerged in Wuhan, China, and has spread globally. However, the transmission route of SARS-CoV-2 has not been fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate SARS-CoV-2 shedding in the excreta of COVID-19 patients. Electronical medical records, including demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory and radiological findings of enrolled patients were extracted and analyzed. Pharyngeal swab, stool, and urine specimens were collected and tested for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Viral shedding at multiple time points in specimens was recorded, and its correlation analyzed with clinical manifestations and the severity of illness. A total of 42 laboratory-confirmed patients were enrolled, 8 (19.05%) of whom had gastrointestinal symptoms. A total of 28 (66.67%) patients tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA in stool specimens, and this was not associated with the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms and the severity of illness. Among them, 18 (64.29%) patients remained positive for viral RNA in the feces after the pharyngeal swabs turned negative. The duration of viral shedding from the feces after negative conversion in pharyngeal swabs was 7 (6-10) days, regardless of COVID-19 severity. The demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory and radiologic findings did not differ between patients who tested positive and negative for SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the feces. Viral RNA was not detectable in urine specimens from 10 patients. Our results demonstrated the presence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the feces of COVID-19 patients and suggested the possibility of SARS-CoV-2 transmission via the fecal-oral route.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Outbreaks , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Virus Shedding , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Electronic Health Records , Feces/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pharynx/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , RNA, Viral/genetics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
6.
J Clin Virol ; 127: 104364, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-98040

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In late December 2019, an outbreak of acute respiratory illness, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), emerged in Wuhan, China. We aimed to study the epidemiology, clinical features and short-term outcomes of patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China. METHODS: We performed a single center, retrospective case series study in 221 patients with laboratory confirmed SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia at a university hospital, including 55 severe patients and 166 non-severe patients, from January 2, 2020 to February 10, 2020. RESULTS: Of the 221 patients with COVID-19, the median age was 55.0 years and 48.9% were male and only 8 (3.6%) patients had a history of exposure to the Huanan Seafood Market. Compared to the non-severe pneumonia patients, the median age of the severe patients was significantly older, and they were more likely to have chronic comorbidities. Most common symptoms in severe patients were high fever, anorexia and dyspnea. On admission, 33.0% patients showed leukopenia and 73.8% showed lymphopenia. In addition, the severe patients suffered a higher rate of co-infections with bacteria or fungus and they were more likely to developing complications. As of February 15, 2020, 19.0% patients had been discharged and 5.4% patients died. 80% of severe cases received ICU (intensive care unit) care, and 52.3% of them transferred to the general wards due to relieved symptoms, and the mortality rate of severe patients in ICU was 20.5%. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with elder age, chronic comorbidities, blood leukocyte/lymphocyte count, procalcitonin level, co-infection and severe complications might increase the risk of poor clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Anorexia/epidemiology , Anorexia/virology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/microbiology , Coinfection/virology , Comorbidity , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/virology , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Fever/virology , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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