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1.
Front Vet Sci ; 9: 896416, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1979079

ABSTRACT

Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) causes watery diarrhea, vomiting, and 30-40% mortality in newborn piglets. A simple, rapid, and sensitive method for PDCoV detection is valuable in its surveillance and control. Here, we developed a novel, cleaved probe-based reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (CP-RT-LAMP) method for PDCoV detection. A cleaved probe with a ribonucleotide insertion that targeted the N gene of PDCoV was designed. During the reaction, the enzyme ribonuclease H2 is activated only when the cleaved probe is perfectly complementary to the template, leading to the hydrolytic release of a quencher moiety and signal output. This method can be easily used on a real-time fluorescence quantitative equipment or an on-site isothermal instrument combined with a smartphone. The specificity assay showed no cross-reactivity with other porcine enteric pathogens. This method had a detection limit of 25 copies/µL, suggesting comparable sensitivity with reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). In detecting 100 clinical samples (48 fecal swab specimens and 52 intestinal specimens), the detection rate of the CP-RT-LAMP method (26%) was higher than that of RT-qPCR (17%). Thus, it is a highly specific and sensitive diagnostic method for PDCoV, with a great application potential for monitoring PDCoV in the laboratory or point-of-care testing in the field.

2.
Lancet Microbe ; 2022 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956388
3.
AIDS Res Ther ; 19(1): 33, 2022 07 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1928191

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multi-types COVID-19 vaccines have shown safety and efficacy against COVID-19 in adults. Although current guidelines encourage people living with HIV (PLWH) to take COVID-19 vaccines, whether their immune response to COVID-19 vaccines is distinct from HIV-free individuals is still unclear. METHODS: Between March to June 2021, 48 PLWH and 40 HNC, aged 18 to 59 years, were enrolled in the study in Wuchang district of Wuhan city. All of them received inactivated COVID-19 vaccine (Sinopharm, WIBP-CorV, Wuhan Institute of Biological Products Co. Ltd) at day 0 and the second dose at day 28. The primary safety outcome was the combined adverse reactions within 7 days after each injection. The primary immunogenicity outcomes were SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) responses by chemiluminescence and total specific IgM and IgG antibodies responses by ELISA and colloidal gold at baseline (day 0), day 14, day 28, day 42, and day 70. RESULTS: In total, the study included 46 PLWH and 38 HNC who finished 70 days' follow-up. The frequency of adverse reactions to the first and second dose was not different between PLWH (30% and 11%) vs. HNC (32% and 24%). NAbs responses among PLWH peaked at day 70, while among HNC peaked at day 42. At day 42, the geometric mean concentration (GMC) and seroconversion rate of nAbs among PLWH were 4.46 binding antibody units (BAU)/mL (95% CI 3.18-5.87) and 26% (95% CI 14-41), which were lower than that among HNC [GMC (18.28 BAU/mL, 95% CI 10.33-32.33), seroconversion rate (63%, 95% CI 44-79)]. IgG responses among both PLWH and HNC peaked at day 70. At day 70, the geometric mean ELISA units (GMEU) and seroconversion rate of IgG among PLWH were 0.193 ELISA units (EU)/mL (95% CI 0.119-0.313) and 51% (95% CI 34-69), which was lower than that among HNC [GMEU (0.379 EU/mL, 95% CI 0.224-0.653), seroconversion rate (86%, 95% CI 64-97)]. There were no serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Early humoral immune response to the inactivated COVID-19 vaccine was weaker and delayed among the PLWH population than that among HNC. This observation remained consistent regardless of a high CD4 count with effective antiretroviral therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Vaccines, Inactivated , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Immunity , Immunoglobulin G/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Inactivated/adverse effects
4.
Virus Evol ; 8(1): veac049, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1922334

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus infections cause diseases that range from mild to severe in mammals and birds. In this study, we detected coronavirus infections in 748 farmed wild animals of 23 species in Guangdong, southern China, by RT-PCR and metagenomic analysis. We identified four coronaviruses in these wild animals and analysed their evolutionary origins. Coronaviruses detected in Rhizomys sinensis were genetically grouped into canine and rodent coronaviruses, which were likely recombinants of canine and rodent coronaviruses. The coronavirus found in Phasianus colchicus was a recombinant pheasant coronavirus of turkey coronavirus and infectious bronchitis virus. The coronavirus in Paguma larvata had a high nucleotide identity (94.6-98.5 per cent) with a coronavirus of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncates). These findings suggested that the wildlife coronaviruses may have experienced homologous recombination and/or crossed the species barrier, likely resulting in the emergence of new coronaviruses. It is necessary to reduce human-animal interactions by prohibiting the eating and raising of wild animals, which may contribute to preventing the emergence of the next coronavirus pandemic.

5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(10)2022 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875642

ABSTRACT

Acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an overactivated inflammatory response caused by direct or indirect injuries that destroy lung parenchymal cells and dramatically reduce lung function. Although some research progress has been made in recent years, the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS remains unclear due to its heterogeneity and etiology. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a type of small noncoding RNA, play a vital role in various diseases. In ALI/ARDS, miRNAs can regulate inflammatory and immune responses by targeting specific molecules. Regulation of miRNA expression can reduce damage and promote the recovery of ALI/ARDS. Consequently, miRNAs are considered as potential diagnostic indicators and therapeutic targets of ALI/ARDS. Given that inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS, we review the miRNAs involved in the inflammatory process of ALI/ARDS to provide new ideas for the pathogenesis, clinical diagnosis, and treatment of ALI/ARDS.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury , MicroRNAs , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Lung/metabolism , MicroRNAs/genetics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/genetics
7.
Front Microbiol ; 13: 845137, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779947

ABSTRACT

Host's innate immunity is the front-line defense against viral infections, but some viruses have evolved multiple strategies for evasion of antiviral innate immunity. The porcine enteric coronaviruses (PECs) consist of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV), transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV), and swine acute diarrhea syndrome-coronavirus (SADS-CoV), which cause lethal diarrhea in neonatal pigs and threaten the swine industry worldwide. PECs interact with host cells to inhibit and evade innate antiviral immune responses like other coronaviruses. Moreover, the immune escape of porcine enteric coronaviruses is the key pathogenic mechanism causing infection. Here, we review the most recent advances in the interactions between viral and host's factors, focusing on the mechanisms by which viral components antagonize interferon (IFN)-mediated innate antiviral immune responses, trying to shed light on new targets and strategies effective for controlling and eliminating porcine enteric coronaviruses.

8.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325515

ABSTRACT

Background: Multi-types COVID-19 vaccines have shown safety and efficacy against COVID-19 in healthy adults. Although current guidelines encourage people living with HIV(PLWH) to take COVID-19 vaccines, whether their immune response to COVID-19 vaccines is distinct from HIV-free individuals is still unclear.Methods: Between March to June 2021, 48 PLWH and 40 HNC, aged 18 to 59 years, were enrolled in the study. All of them received inactivated COVID-19 vaccine at day 0 and the second dose at day 28. The primary safety outcome was the combined adverse reactions within 7days after each injection. The primary immunogenicity outcomes were neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) responses by chemiluminescence and total specific IgM and IgG antibodies responses by ELISA and colloidal gold at baseline (day 0), day 14, day 28, day 42, and day 70.Findings: In total, the study included 46 PLWH and 38 HNC who finished 70 days’ follow-up. The frequency of adverse reactions to the first and second dose was not different between PLWH (30% and 11%) vs HNC (32% and 24%). NAbs responses among PLWH peaked at day 70, while among HNC peaked at day 42. At day 42, the geometric mean concentration (GMC) and seroconversion rate of nAbs among PLWH were 4.46 binding antibody units (BAU)/mL (95% CI, 3.18-5.87) and 26% (95% CI, 14-41), which were lower than that among HNC [GMC (18.28 BAU/mL, 95% CI, 10.33-32.33), seroconversion rate (63%, 95% CI, 44-79)]. IgG responses among both PLWH and HNC peaked at day 70. At day 70, the geometric mean ELISA units (GMEU) and seroconversion rate of IgG among PLWH were 0.193 ELISA units (EU)/mL (95% CI, 0.119-0.313) and 51% (95% CI, 34-69), which was lower than that among HNC [GMEU (0.379 BAU/mL, 95% CI, 0.224-0.653), seroconversion rate (86%, 95% CI, 64-97)].Interpretation: Early humoral immune response to the inactivated COVID-19 vaccine was weaker and delayed among the PLWH population than that among HNC. This observation remained consistent regardless of a high CD4 count and a low HIV viral load suppressed by ART.Funding: This work was supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of China (2017YFE0103800), the National Nature Science Foundation of China (81903371), NIMH (R34MH119963), the National Science and Technology Major Project (2018ZX10101-001-001-003), and Special Found on Prevention and Control of New Coronary Pneumonia in Guangdong Universities (2020KZDZX1047), Medical Science and Technology Innovation Platform Support Project of Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University (PTXM2020008), Science and Technology Innovation Cultivation Fund of Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University (cxpy2017043). Medical Science Advancement Program (Basic Medical Sciences) of Wuhan University (TFJC2018004).Declaration of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.Ethical Approval: The study was approved by the Research and Ethics Committee of Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, P. R. China (2020079K-1). Informed consent was obtained from all individuals enrolled in this study.

9.
J Clin Lab Anal ; 36(3): e24264, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653267

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 outbreaks on emergency patients in a resuscitation room in Nanning, China. METHODS: A single-center cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted in the emergency department of a tertiary public hospital from January 1, 2019, to December 31, 2020, in Nanning, Guangxi, China. We collected the data of patients in the resuscitation room to investigate the number of patients accessing emergency services during the study period. Data in 2020 were compared to the data during the same period in 2019. RESULTS: The number of emergency patients in the resuscitation room during the COVID-19 pandemic has decreased in intrinsic diseases, extrinsic diseases, and pediatric cases, especially in the early stages of the pandemic. Additionally, the length of stay of emergency patients in the resuscitation room was reduced. CONCLUSIONS: The number of emergency patients in the resuscitation room during the pandemic of COVID-19 in 2020 was reduced compared to that in the same period in 2019 in Nanning, China. This situation shows a serious social problem, which should arouse the attention of the medical profession and the government.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Resuscitation/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-8, 2021 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379272

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, an outbreak of an unknown cause of pneumonia (later named coronavirus disease 2019 [COVID-19]) occurred in Wuhan, China. This was found to be attributed to a novel coronavirus of zoonotic origin, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2; previously named 2019 novel coronavirus or 2019-nCoV). The SARS-CoV-2, a new type of highly pathogenic human coronavirus related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), spread rapidly worldwide and caused 246,303,023 confirmed infections, including 4,994,160 deaths, by October 31, 2021. SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV vary in their specific characteristics, regarding epidemics and pathogenesis. This article focuses on the comparison of the virology, epidemiology, and clinical features of SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 to reveal their common and distinct properties, to provide an up-to-date resource for the development of advanced systems and strategies to monitor and control future epidemics of highly pathogenic human coronaviruses.

11.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(8)2021 Aug 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348705

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has highlighted the urgent need for effective prophylactic vaccination to prevent the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Intranasal vaccination is an attractive strategy to prevent COVID-19 as the nasal mucosa represents the first-line barrier to SARS-CoV-2 entry. The current intramuscular vaccines elicit systemic immunity but not necessarily high-level mucosal immunity. Here, we tested a single intranasal dose of our candidate adenovirus type 5-vectored vaccine encoding the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (AdCOVID) in inbred, outbred, and transgenic mice. A single intranasal vaccination with AdCOVID elicited a strong and focused immune response against RBD through the induction of mucosal IgA in the respiratory tract, serum neutralizing antibodies, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with a Th1-like cytokine expression profile. A single AdCOVID dose resulted in immunity that was sustained for over six months. Moreover, a single intranasal dose completely protected K18-hACE2 mice from lethal SARS-CoV-2 challenge, preventing weight loss and mortality. These data show that AdCOVID promotes concomitant systemic and mucosal immunity and represents a promising vaccine candidate.

12.
China CDC Wkly ; 3(32): 681-687, 2021 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296414

ABSTRACT

What is already known about this topic? The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic in China had been effectively controlled for several months, but as the ambient temperature dropped, large gathering-initiated epidemics occurred in northern China, including Hebei, Liaoning, and Jilin provinces. What is added by this report? A sudden epidemic emerged in Wangkui County, Suihua City, Heilongjiang Province, on January 9, 2021. An asymptomatically-infected resident of Harbin City returned from Suihua and triggered a large-scale outbreak in the Zhengda Food Processing Company in Harbin, Heilongjiang. The epidemic was associated with widespread community transmission inside and outside the company, eventually leading to 260 persons being infected (87.8% of 296 patients in Harbin). What are the implications for public health practice? This study demonstrates the importance of screening for infections in the COVID-19 prevention and control system, shares experiences identifying and managing asymptomatic infections, and recommends food processing enterprises like the Zhengda Company to improve preventative measures. Our evidence-based epidemiological analyses provide methods for finding high-risk settings and evaluating epidemic situations when many asymptomatic patients are identified in a short period of time.

13.
J Med Virol ; 93(2): 962-972, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196416

ABSTRACT

To systematically analyze the blood coagulation features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients to provide a reference for clinical practice. An electronic search in PubMed, EMbase, Web of Science, Scopus, CNKI, WanFang Data, and VIP databases to identify studies describing the blood coagulation features of COVID-19 patients from 1 January 2020 to 21 April 2020. Three reviewers independently screened literature, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias of included studies, then, the meta-analysis was performed by using Stata 12.0 software. Thirty-four studies involving 6492 COVID-19 patients were included. Meta-analysis showed that patients with severe disease showed significantly lower platelet count (weighted mean differences [WMD]: -16.29 × 109 /L; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -25.34 to -7.23) and shorter activated partial thromboplastin time (WMD: -0.81 seconds; 95% CI: -1.94 to 0.33) but higher D-dimer levels (WMD: 0.44 µg/mL; 95% CI: 0.29-0.58), higher fibrinogen levels (WMD: 0.51 g/L; 95% CI: 0.33-0.69) and longer prothrombin time (PT; WMD: 0.65 seconds; 95% CI: 0.44-0.86). Patients who died showed significantly higher D-dimer levels (WMD: 6.58 µg/mL; 95% CI: 3.59-9.57), longer PT (WMD: 1.27 seconds; 95% CI: 0.49-2.06) and lower platelet count (WMD: -39.73 × 109 /L; 95% CI: -61.99 to -17.45) than patients who survived. Coagulation dysfunction is common in severe COVID-19 patients and it is associated with severity of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Fibrinogen/analysis , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Platelet Count , Prothrombin Time , Risk Factors
14.
J Aerosol Med Pulm Drug Deliv ; 34(2): 108-114, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127303

ABSTRACT

Background: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection is associated with strong infectiousness and has no effective therapy. We aimed to explore the efficacy and safety of Mycobacterium vaccae nebulization in the treatment of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Methods: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, we included 31 adult patients with moderate COVID-19 who were admitted to the Fourth People's Hospital of Nanning (Nanning, China) between January 22, 2020 and February 17, 2020. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: group A (standard care group) and group B (M. vaccae in combination with standard care group). The primary outcome was the time interval from admission to viral RNA negative conversion (oropharyngeal swabs were used in this study). Secondary outcomes included chest computed tomography (CT), mortality, length of hospital stay, complications during treatment, and so on. Patients were followed up to 4 weeks after discharge (reexamination of viral RNA, chest CT, etc.). Results: Nucleic acid test negative conversion time in group B was shorter than that in group A (2.9 days [2.7-8.7] vs. 6.8 days [3.3-13.8]; p = 0.045). No death and no conversion to severe or critical cases were observed in both groups. Two weeks after discharge, neither "relapse" nor "return to positive" cases were found. Four weeks after discharge, it was found that there was no case of " relapse " or "return to positive" in group B, and 1 patient in group A showed "return to positive", but there was no clinical manifestation and imaging progression. No adverse reactions related to M. vaccae were found during observation period. Conclusion: M. vaccae treatment might shorten the time interval from admission to viral RNA negative conversion, which might be beneficial to the prevention and treatment of COVID-19. Clinical Trial Registration: ChiCTR2000030016.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Length of Stay , Mycobacteriaceae/immunology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Administration, Inhalation , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(5): e23781, 2021 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087849

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Our study aims to summarize the clinical characteristics of patients with severe or critically ill coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).Five databases were electronically searched to collect studies describing clinical characteristics of severe or critically ill COVID-19 patients and published between January 1, 2020 and April 12, 2020. Three reviewers independently collected the literature, extracted the required data, and assessed the risk of publication bias of the included studies before including the studies in the meta-analysis.A total of 40 studies involving 2459 patients with severe or critically ill COVID-19 patients were included. Meta-analysis showed that a greater proportion of severe or critically COVID-19 patients were male (62.3%), and the 2 main clinical symptoms were fever (87.4%) and cough (66.3%). Other common clinical symptoms included dyspnea (45.3%), chest tightness (37.4%), fatigue (36.6%), and expectoration (31.9%). Minor symptoms included myalgia (19.5%), dizziness (11.5%), headache (11.4%), diarrhea (11.2%), pharyngalgia (11.0%), nausea, and vomiting (5.9%). Most patients showed elevated levels of C-reactive protein (83.5%) and D-dimer (73.3%), lymphopenia (70.3%), and normal leukocyte counts (56.9%). Other findings included abnormal levels of liver function (39.8%), elevated procalcitonin (36.6%), leukocytosis (21.7%), thrombocytopenia (19.0%), and leucopenia (18.2%). Most patients showed acute respiratory distress syndrome (60.8%). Other complications included acute cardiac injury (37.1%), shock (32.0%), and acute kidney injury (22.0%).The most common symptoms of severe or critically ill COVID-19 patients were fever and cough. Most patients showed lymphopenia, elevated levels of C-reactive protein and D-dimer. A large percentage of patients progress to ARDS, acute cardiac injury, acute kidney injury and shock were also common.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cough , Critical Illness/therapy , Fever , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cough/diagnosis , Cough/etiology , Fever/diagnosis , Fever/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index
16.
SciFinder; 2020.
Preprint | SciFinder | ID: ppcovidwho-4745

ABSTRACT

A review on experience and recommendations on clin. treatment and transport of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients with severe new-type coronavirus pneumonia COVID-19 in Guangxi.

17.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(47): e23315, 2020 Nov 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005842

ABSTRACT

Our study aimed to assess the existing evidence on whether severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with elevated inflammatory markers.The PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, WanFang, and China Science and Technology Journal databases were searched to identify studies published between January 1 and April 21, 2020 that assayed inflammatory markers in COVID-19 patients. Three reviewers independently examined the literature, extracted relevant data, and assessed the risk of publication bias before including the meta-analysis studies.Fifty-six studies involving 8719 COVID-19 patients were identified. Meta-analysis showed that patients with severe disease showed elevated levels of white blood cell count (WMD: 1.15, 95% CI: 0.78-1.52), C-reactive protein (WMD: 38.85, 95% CI: 31.19-46.52), procalcitonin (WMD: 0.08, 95% CI: 0.06-0.11), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (WMD: 10.15, 95% CI: 5.03-15.46), interleukin-6 (WMD: 23.87, 95% CI: 15.95-31.78), and interleukin-10 (WMD: 2.12, 95% CI: 1.97-2.28). Similarly, COVID-19 patients who died during follow-up showed significantly higher levels of white blood cell count (WMD: 4.11, 95% CI: 3.25-4.97), C-reactive protein (WMD: 74.18, 95% CI: 56.63-91.73), procalcitonin (WMD: 0.26, 95% CI: 0.11-0.42), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (WMD: 10.94, 95% CI: 4.79-17.09), and interleukin-6 (WMD: 59.88, 95% CI: 19.46-100.30) than survivors.Severe COVID-19 is associated with higher levels of inflammatory markers than a mild disease, so tracking these markers may allow early identification or even prediction of disease progression.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Biomarkers/blood , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Inflammation , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Procalcitonin/blood , SARS-CoV-2
18.
China Tropical Medicine ; 20(9):875-878, 2020.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-890733

ABSTRACT

Objective: To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of a familial cluster of pneumonia associated with SARS-CoV-2.

19.
J Med Virol ; 92(10): 1902-1914, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-763159

ABSTRACT

We aimed to systematically review the clinical characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Seven databases were searched to collect studies about the clinical characteristics of COVID-19 from January 1, 2020 to February 28, 2020. Then, meta-analysis was performed by using Stata12.0 software. A total of 38 studies involving 3062 COVID-19 patients were included. Meta-analysis showed that a higher proportion of infected patients was male (56.9%). The incidence rate of respiratory failure or acute respiratory distress syndrome was 19.5% and the fatality rate was 5.5%. Fever (80.4%), fatigue (46%), cough (63.1%), and expectoration (41.8%) were the most common clinical manifestations. Other common symptoms included muscle soreness (33%), anorexia (38.8%), chest tightness (35.7%), shortness of breath (35%), dyspnea (33.9%). Minor symptoms included nausea and vomiting (10.2%), diarrhea (12.9%), headache (15.4%), pharyngalgia (13.1%), shivering (10.9%), and abdominal pain (4.4%). The proportion of patients that was asymptomatic was 11.9%. Normal leukocyte counts (69.7%), lymphopenia (56.5%), elevated C-reactive protein levels (73.6%), elevated ESR (65.6%), and oxygenation index decreased (63.6%) were observed in most patients. About 37.2% of patients were found with elevated D-dimer, 25.9% of patients with leukopenia, along with abnormal levels of liver function (29%), and renal function (25.5%). Other findings included leukocytosis (12.6%) and elevated procalcitonin (17.5%). Only 25.8% of patients had lesions involving a single lung and 75.7% of patients had lesions involving bilateral lungs. The most commonly experienced symptoms of COVID-19 patients were fever, fatigue, cough, and expectoration. A relatively small percentage of patients were asymptomatic. Most patients showed normal leucocytes counts, lymphopenia, elevated levels of C-reactive protein and ESR. Bilateral lung involvement was common.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Child , Cough/diagnosis , Cough/metabolism , Cough/virology , Diarrhea/diagnosis , Diarrhea/metabolism , Diarrhea/virology , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/metabolism , Fatigue/virology , Female , Fever/diagnosis , Fever/metabolism , Fever/virology , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/metabolism , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Young Adult
20.
Epidemiol Infect ; 148: e175, 2020 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-711979

ABSTRACT

Our study aimed to systematically analyse the risk factors of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with severe disease. An electronic search in eight databases to identify studies describing severe or critically ill COVID-19 patients from 1 January 2020 to 3 April 2020. In the end, we meta-analysed 40 studies involving 5872 COVID-19 patients. The average age was higher in severe COVID-19 patients (weighted mean difference; WMD = 10.69, 95%CI 7.83-13.54). Patients with severe disease showed significantly lower platelet count (WMD = -18.63, 95%CI -30.86 to -6.40) and lymphocyte count (WMD = -0.35, 95%CI -0.41 to -0.30) but higher C-reactive protein (CRP; WMD = 42.7, 95%CI 31.12-54.28), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; WMD = 137.4, 95%CI 105.5-169.3), white blood cell count(WBC), procalcitonin(PCT), D-dimer, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and creatinine(Cr). Similarly, patients who died showed significantly higher WBC, D-dimer, ALT, AST and Cr but similar platelet count and LDH as patients who survived. These results indicate that older age, low platelet count, lymphopenia, elevated levels of LDH, ALT, AST, PCT, Cr and D-dimer are associated with severity of COVID-19 and thus could be used as early identification or even prediction of disease progression.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Thrombocytopenia/epidemiology , Age Factors , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Creatinine/blood , Critical Illness , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Leukocyte Count , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/blood , Pandemics , Platelet Count , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Procalcitonin/blood , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombocytopenia/blood
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