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1.
Clin Lab ; 68(1)2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622821

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since December 2019, there has been a global outbreak of COVID-19. As of the end of July 2020, more than 600,000 deaths had been reported globally. The purpose of this paper is to further explore the application of non-invasive ventilation in severe COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted to included 57 confirmed COVID-19 patients, among which 36 cases were severe. According to different oxygen inhalation methods, they were divided into non-invasive ventilator assisted ventilation group with 21 cases (group A) and 15 cases of nasal catheter oxygen inhalation group (group B). The data of respiration (RR), heart rate (HR), partial arterial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), partial arterial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2), and oxygenation index (OI) before the treatment of noninvasive ventilator assisted ventilation or nasal catheter oxygen treatment at 24, 48, and 72 hours of treatment of the 2 groups were collected and analyzed to determine whether the above indicators were statistically different in each time period. RESULTS: After 24 hours of treatment with noninvasive ventilator assisted ventilation in group A, RR gradually decreased, PaO2 and OI were significantly higher than before treatment, while after 24 hours of treatment, PaO2, RR, HR and other indexes in group B showed no significant improvement, and OI increased gradually after 48 hours of treatment, with statistically significant difference compared with that before treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Early adoption of non-invasive ventilation can effectively improve the hypoxic state of patients with severe COVID-19. The combination of underlying diseases will not prolong the use of non-invasive ventilation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventilators, Mechanical
2.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 5565549, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476874

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an emerging virus causing substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. We performed a cross-sectional investigation of SARS-CoV-2 clusters in Suzhou to determine the transmissibility of the virus among close contacts and to assess the demographic and clinical characteristics between index and secondary cases. Methods: We review the clustered patients with SARS-CoV-2 infections in Suzhou between 22 January and 29 February 2020. The demographic and clinical characteristics were compared between index and secondary cases. We calculated the basic reproduction number (R 0) among close contacts with SLI model. Results: By 22 February, 87 patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection were reported, including 50 sporadic and 37 clustered cases, who were generated from 13 clusters. On admission, 5 (20.8%) out of 24 secondary cases were asymptomatic. The male ratio of index cases was significantly higher than that of secondary cases. Additionally, the index cases were more likely to have fever and increased CRP levels than the secondary cases. The R 0 values of clusters displayed a significantly declining trend over time for all clusters. The relative risk of infection in blood-related contacts of cases versus unrelated contacts was 1.60 for SARS-CoV-2 (95% CI: 0.42-2.95). Conclusions: In conclusion, SARS-CoV-2 has great person-to-person transmission capability among close contacts. The secondary cases are more prone to have mild symptoms than index cases. There is no increased RR of secondary infection in blood relatives versus unrelated contacts. The high rate of asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infections highlights the urgent need to enhance active case finding strategy for early detection of infectious patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Contact Tracing , Family Characteristics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors
3.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258336, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463315

ABSTRACT

Decontaminating N95 respirators for reuse could mitigate shortages during the COVID-19 pandemic. Although the United States Center for Disease Control has identified Ultraviolet-C irradiation as one of the most promising methods for N95 decontamination, very few studies have evaluated the efficacy of Ultraviolet-C for SARS-CoV-2 inactivation. In addition, most decontamination studies are performed using mask coupons that do not recapitulate the complexity of whole masks. We sought to directly evaluate the efficacy of Ultraviolet-C mediated inactivation of SARS-CoV-2 on N95 respirators. To that end we created a portable UV-C light-emitting diode disinfection chamber and tested decontamination of SARS-CoV-2 at different sites on two models of N95 respirator. We found that decontamination efficacy depends on mask model, material and location of the contamination on the mask. Our results emphasize the need for caution when interpreting efficacy data of UV-C decontamination methods.


Subject(s)
Decontamination , Disinfection , Masks , N95 Respirators , Ultraviolet Rays , Decontamination/instrumentation , Decontamination/methods , Disinfection/instrumentation , Disinfection/methods , Equipment Reuse
4.
Int J Biol Sci ; 17(8): 1925-1939, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266906

ABSTRACT

Background: Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) allow entry of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) into host cells and play essential roles in cancer therapy. However, the functions of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in kidney cancer remain unclear, especially as kidneys are targets for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods: UCSC Xena project, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) databases (GSE30589 and GSE59185) were searched for gene expression in human tissues, gene expression data, and clinical information. Several bioinformatics methods were utilized to analyze the correlation between ACE2 and TMPRSS2 with respect to the prognosis of kidney renal clear cell carcinoma (KIRC) and kidney renal papillary cell carcinoma (KIRP). Results: ACE2 expression was significantly upregulated in tumor tissue, while its downregulation was associated with low survival in KIRC and KIRP patients. TMPRSS2 was downregulated in KIRC and KIRP, and its expression was not correlated with patient survival. According to clinical risk factor-based prediction models, ACE2 exhibits predictive accuracy for kidney cancer prognosis and is correlated with metabolism and immune infiltration. In an animal model, ACE2 expression was remarkably downregulated in SARS-CoV-2-infected cells compared to in the control. Conclusion: ACE2 expression is highly correlated with various metabolic pathways and is involved in immune infiltration.it plays a crucial role than TMPRSS2 in diagnosing and prognosis of kidney cancer patients. The overlap in ACE2 expression between kidney cancer and SARS-CoV-2 infection suggests that patients with KIRC or KIRP are at high risk of developing serious symptoms.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , COVID-19/complications , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/complications , Kidney Neoplasms/complications , Receptors, Virus/biosynthesis , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Animals , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/immunology , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/metabolism , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/mortality , Chlorocebus aethiops , Down-Regulation , Drug Resistance, Neoplasm , Female , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Gene Regulatory Networks , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Kidney Neoplasms/immunology , Kidney Neoplasms/metabolism , Kidney Neoplasms/mortality , Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Animal , Neoplasm Proteins/biosynthesis , Neoplasm Proteins/genetics , Organ Specificity , Prognosis , Proportional Hazards Models , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/biosynthesis , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Tissue Array Analysis , Vero Cells
5.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-633

ABSTRACT

Background: Since December 2019, a novel coronavirus (COVID-19) infection pneumonia broke out in Wuhan city (the capital of Hubeprovince in China), and rapidl

6.
Open Med (Wars) ; 15(1): 605-612, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704788

ABSTRACT

The progress of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is still severe. While everyone has been striving very hard to combat the pandemic, some healthcare professionals have shown varying degrees of infection symptoms and even died. The Chinese Army Medical Aid Team arrived in Wuhan on January 25, 2020, and quickly entered the battle against the pandemic after a short and rigorous training. As one of the earliest medical teams to enter the pandemic area, researchers have been exploring effective infection control measures that are currently in practice. Through observation and research, it has been noticed that layers of protective equipment have a hidden danger of infection while protecting the safety of the personnel. The members of each medical team have typically focused on the standard use of personal protective equipment (PPE). However, after a long period of intensive diagnosis and treatment in clinics and due to physical exertion and tiredness, problems such as improper operation are prone to occur during the tedious PPE doffing, thereby producing a relatively high risk of infection. This study primarily analyzes PPE doffing procedures, existing problems, and measures for improvement to explore methods to improve PPE donning and doffing and reduce the risk of infection.

7.
Clin Infect Dis ; 71(15): 844-846, 2020 07 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-3279

ABSTRACT

We present a case of a 30-week pregnant woman with the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) delivering a healthy infant with no evidence of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Premature Birth/virology , Adult , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
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