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1.
Front Immunol ; 13: 864775, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862607

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and particularly the emerging variants have deepened the need for widely available therapeutic options. We have demonstrated that hexamer-enhancing mutations in the Fc region of anti-SARS-CoV IgG antibodies lead to a noticeable improvement in IC50 in both pseudo and live virus neutralization assay compared to parental molecules. We also show that hexamer-enhancing mutants improve C1q binding to target surface. To our knowledge, this is the first time this format has been explored for application in viral neutralization and the studies provide proof-of-concept for the use of hexamer-enhanced IgG1 molecules as potential anti-viral therapeutics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/genetics , Immunologic Tests , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
2.
J Affect Disord ; 307: 142-148, 2022 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783445

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is associated with an increased risk of mental health problems including suicide in many subpopulations, but its influence on stable patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) has been studied fleetingly. This study examined the one-year prevalence of suicidality including suicidal ideation (SI), suicide plans (SP), and suicide attempts (SA) as well as their correlates in clinically stable MDD patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional, observational study was conducted between October 1, 2020, and October 15, 2021, in six tertiary psychiatric hospitals. Socio-demographic information, clinical data and one-year prevalence of suicidality were recorded. RESULTS: Altogether, 1718 participants who met the eligibility criteria were included. The overall one-year prevalence of suicidality during the COVID-19 pandemic was 68.04% (95% confidence intervals (CI) =65.84-70.25%), with one-year SI prevalence of 66.4% (95%CI = 64.18-68.65%), SP prevalence of 36.26% (95%CI = 33.99-38.54%), and SA prevalence of 39.35% (95%CI = 37.04-41.66%). Binary logistic regression analyses revealed male gender, married marital status, college education level and above and age were negatively associated with risk of suicidality. Urban residence, unemployed work status, experiences of cyberbullying, a history of suicide among family members or friends, and more severe fatigue, physical pain, and residual depressive symptoms were positively associated with risk of suicidality. CONCLUSIONS: Suicidality is common among clinically stable MDD patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Regular suicide screening and preventive measures should be provided to clinically stable MDD patients during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Suicide , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder, Major/psychology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Suicidal Ideation
3.
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol ; 35(2): 229-236, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731438

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The negative effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on sleep quality of clinically stable psychiatric patients is unknown. This study examined the prevalence of sleep disturbances and their association with quality of life (QOL) in clinically stable older psychiatric patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This multicenter, cross-sectional study involved older patients attending maintenance treatment at outpatient departments of four major psychiatric hospitals in China. Patients' socio-demographic and clinical characteristics were collected. Sleep disturbances, depressive symptoms, and QOL were assessed with the Insomnia Severity Index, the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, and 2 items of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief version, respectively. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the independent associations of socio-demographic and clinical variables with sleep disturbances, while the association between sleep disturbances and QOL was explored with analysis of covariance. RESULTS: A total of 941 patients were recruited. The prevalence of sleep disturbances was 57.1% (95% CI: 53.9-60.2%). Analysis of covariance revealed that QOL was significantly lower in patients with sleep disturbances compared to those without. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that sleep disturbances were positively and independently associated with more severe depressive symptoms (OR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.26-1.37). Compared to patients with major depressive disorder, those with other psychiatric diagnoses had a significantly higher prevalence of sleep disturbances (OR = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.00-2.08). CONCLUSION: Sleep disturbances were common among clinically stable older psychiatric patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Considering the negative association with QOL, this subpopulation needs regular assessment and timely treatment to reduce their sleep disturbances and improve their QOL.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , Quality of Life/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep
4.
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol ; 35(2): 196-205, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731434

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has profound negative effects on the mental health of clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders. This study examined the influential nodes of psychiatric problems and their associations in this population using network analysis. METHODS: Clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders were consecutively recruited from four major psychiatric hospitals in China from May 22 to July 15, 2020. Depressive and anxiety syndromes (depression and anxiety hereafter), insomnia, posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), pain, and fatigue were measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire, General Anxiety Disorder, Insomnia Severity Index, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist - Civilian Version, and Numeric Rating Scales for pain and fatigue, respectively. RESULTS: A total of 1063 participants were included. The network analysis revealed that depression was the most influential node followed by anxiety as indicated by the centrality index of strength. In contrast, the edge connecting depression and anxiety was the strongest edge, followed by the edge connecting depression and insomnia, and the edge connecting depression and fatigue as indicated by edge-weights. The network structure was invariant by gender based on the network structure invariance test (M = .14, P = .20) and global strength invariance tests (S = .08, P = .30). CONCLUSIONS: Attention should be paid to depression and its associations with anxiety, insomnia, and fatigue in the screening and treatment of mental health problems in clinically stable older psychiatric patients affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Humans , Pain , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
5.
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol ; 35(2): 237-244, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731432

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The pattern of suicidality in older patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic is not clear. This study examined the prevalence of suicidality and its association with quality of life (QOL) among older clinically stable patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted from May 22 to July 15, 2020, among four major tertiary psychiatric hospitals in China. Suicidality was assessed by asking 3 standardized questions. Depressive symptoms, pain, and QOL were assessed with the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the numeric pain rating scale (NPRS), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-brief version, respectively. RESULTS: A total of 1063 clinically stable patients participated and completed the assessment. The prevalence of suicidality was 11.8% (95% CI: 9.9%-13.7%) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that poor treatment adherence (P = .009, OR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.17-2.96) and perceived illness worsening during the COVID-19 outbreak (P = .02, OR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.15-3.73), being diagnosed with major depressive disorder (P < .001, OR = 2.79, 95% CI: 1.68-4.64), PHQ-9 total score (P < .001, OR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.15-1.24) and NPRS total score (P = .002, OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.06-1.29) were associated with higher risk of suicidality. After controlling for covariates, older psychiatric patients with suicidality had lower QOL compared to those without (F(1, 1063) =16.5, P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: Suicidality was common in older patients with clinically stable psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic. Considering its negative impact on QOL and personal suffering, routine screening and preventive suicide measures should be implemented for older psychiatric patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Mental Disorders , Suicide , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Suicide/psychology
6.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315065

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Liver injury is found in some of patients with COVID-19. Liver injury of patients based on severity grading and abdominal radiological signs have not been reported until now. The aim of our study is to determine clinical profiles of the patients based on severity grading, describe abdominal radiological signs, and investigate the correlations of the severity with clinical profiles and radiological signs. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included 115 patients with COVID-19 from Jan 2020 to Feb 2020. Medical records of the patients were collected and CT images were reviewed. RESULTS: Common clinical manifestations of the patients with COVID-19 were fever (68.70%), cough (56.52%), fatigue (31.30%);some of them had gastrointestinal symptoms (diarrhea,12.17%;nausea or vomiting 7.83%;inappetence, 7.83%). Abnormal liver function was observed in some of the patients with COVID-19. Significant differences in the levels of AST, albumin,CRP were observed among different groups classified by the severity. Common findings of upper abdominal CT scan were liver hypodensity (26.09%) and pericholecystic fat stranding (21.27%);liver hypodensity were more frequently found in critical cases (58.82%). The semi-quantitative CT score of pulmonary lesions, CT-quantified liver/spleen attenuation ratio correlated with severity grading in patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Some of patients with COVID-19 displayed liver damage revealed by liver functional tests and upper abdominal CT imaging, and some of liver functional tests and CT signs correlate with severity grading;thus, it will allow an earlier identification of high-risk patients for early effective intervention.

7.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-308290

ABSTRACT

The risk for severe illness and mortality from COVID-19 significantly increases with age. As a result, age-stratified modeling for COVID-19 dynamics is the key to study how to reduce hospitalizations and mortality from COVID-19. By taking advantage of network theory, we develop an age-stratified epidemic model for COVID-19 in complex contact networks. Specifically, we present an extension of standard SEIR (susceptible-exposed-infectious-removed) compartmental model, called age-stratified SEAHIR (susceptible-exposedasymptomatic-hospitalized-infectious-removed) model, to capture the spread of COVID-19 over multitype random networks with general degree distributions. We derive several key epidemiological metrics and then propose an age-stratified vaccination strategy to decrease the mortality and hospitalizations. Through extensive study, we discover that the outcome of vaccination prioritization depends on the reproduction number R0. Specifically, the elderly should be prioritized only when R0 is relatively high. If ongoing intervention policies, such as universal masking, could suppress R0 at a relatively low level, prioritizing the high-transmission age group (i.e., adults aged 20-39) is most effective to reduce both mortality and hospitalizations. These conclusions provide useful recommendations for age-based vaccination prioritization for COVID-19.

8.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325514

ABSTRACT

Background: The pattern of fatigue in older psychiatric patients during the COVID-19 outbreak was unknown. This study examined the prevalence of fatigue and its association with overall quality of life (overall QOL) in clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 outbreak. Methods: : This was a multicenter, cross-sectional study. Fatigue, depressive symptoms, pain, insomnia symptoms, and overall QOL were assessed with standardized instruments. Results: : A total of 1,063 patients were recruited. The prevalence of fatigue was 47.1% (95%CI: 44.1% - 50.1%). An analysis of covariance revealed that overall QOL was significantly lower in patients with fatigue compared to those without (P=0.011). A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that more severe depressive symptoms (OR=1.15, P<0.001), insomnia symptoms (OR=1.08, P<0.001) and pain (OR=1.43, P<0.001) were significantly associated with fatigue. Conclusions: : Fatigue is common among clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 outbreak. Considering its negative impact on overall QOL, regular assessment of fatigue and appropriate treatment warrant attention in this subpopulation.

9.
Front Neurol ; 12: 769511, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606848

ABSTRACT

Background: Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a multisystem medical condition with heterogeneous symptom expression. Currently, there is no effective cure or treatment for the standard care of patients. A variety of ME/CFS symptoms can be linked to the vital life functions of the brainstem, the lower extension of the brain best known as the hub relaying information back and forth between the cerebral cortex and various parts of the body. Objective/Methods: Over the past decade, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies have emerged to understand ME/CFS with interesting findings, but there has lacked a synthesized evaluation of what has been found thus far regarding the involvement of the brainstem. We conducted this study to review and evaluate the recent MRI findings via a literature search of the MEDLINE database, from which 11 studies met the eligibility criteria. Findings: Data showed that MRI studies frequently reported structural changes in the white and gray matter. Abnormalities of the functional connectivity within the brainstem and with other brain regions have also been found. The studies have suggested possible mechanisms including astrocyte dysfunction, cerebral perfusion impairment, impaired nerve conduction, and neuroinflammation involving the brainstem, which may at least partially explain a substantial portion of the ME/CFS symptoms and their heterogeneous presentations in individual patients. Conclusions: This review draws research attention to the role of the brainstem in ME/CFS, helping enlighten future work to uncover the pathologies and mechanisms of this complex medical condition, for improved management and patient care.

10.
Poult Sci ; 100(7): 101210, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283536

ABSTRACT

Avian infectious bronchitis (IB), caused by avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), is an acute and highly contagious disease that is extremely harmful to the poultry industry throughout the world. The cross-using of different attenuated live vaccine strains has led to the occurrence of diverse IBV serotypes. In this study, we isolated an IBV strain from a chicken farm in southwest China and designated it CK/CH/SCMY/160315. Construction of a phylogenetic tree based on full S1 gene sequence analysis suggested that CK/CH/SCMY/160315 bears similarity to GI-28, and further comparison of S1 amino acid residues revealed that CK/CH/SCMY/160315 showed mutations and deletions in many key positions between LDT3-A and other GI-28 reference strains. Importantly, CK/CH/SCMY/160315 was identified as a novel recombinant virus derived from live attenuated vaccine strains H120 (GI-1), 4/91 (GI-13), LDT3-A (GI-28), and the field strain LJL/08-1 (GI-19), identifying at least 5 recombination sites in both structural and accessory genes. Pathogenicity analysis indicated that CK/CH/SCMY/160315 caused listlessness, sneezing, huddling, head shaking, and increased antibody levels in the inoculated chickens. To further describe pathogenicity of this novel strain, we assessed viral load in different tissues and conducted hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining of the trachea, lungs and kidneys. Our results provide evidence for the continuing evolution of IBV field strains via genetic recombination and mutation, leading to outbreaks in the vaccinated chicken populations in China.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Infectious bronchitis virus , Poultry Diseases , Animals , Chickens , China , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Phylogeny
11.
J Subst Abuse Treat ; 133: 108492, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253265

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine-delivered buprenorphine (tele-buprenorphine) can potentially increase access to buprenorphine for patients with opioid use disorder (OUD), especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, but we know little about use in clinical care. METHODS: This study was a retrospective national cohort study of veterans diagnosed with opioid use disorder (OUD) receiving buprenorphine treatment from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) in fiscal years 2012-2019. The study examined trends in use of tele-buprenorphine and compared demographic and clinical characteristics in patients who received tele-buprenorphine versus those who received in-person treatment only. RESULTS: Utilization of tele-buprenorphine increased from 2.29% of buprenorphine patients in FY2012 (n = 187) to 7.96% (n = 1352) in FY2019 in VHA veterans nationally. Compared to patients receiving only in-person care, tele-buprenorphine patients were less likely to be male (AOR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.73-0.98) or Black (AOR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.45-0.65). Tele-buprenorphine patients were more likely to be treated in community-based outpatient clinics rather than large medical centers (AOR = 2.91, 95% CI: 2.67-3.17) and to live in rural areas (AOR = 2.12, 95% CI:1.92-2.35). The median days supplied of buprenorphine treatment was 722 (interquartile range: 322-1459) among the tele-buprenorphine patients compared to 295 (interquartile range: 67-854) among patients who received treatment in-person. CONCLUSIONS: Use of telemedicine to deliver buprenorphine treatment in VHA increased 3.5-fold between 2012 and 2019, though overall use remained low prior to COVID-19. Tele-buprenorphine is a promising modality especially when treatment access is limited. However, we must continue to understand how practitioners and patient are using telemedicine and how these patients' outcomes compare to those using in-person care.


Subject(s)
Buprenorphine , COVID-19 , Opioid-Related Disorders , Telemedicine , Veterans , Buprenorphine/therapeutic use , Cohort Studies , Humans , Male , Opiate Substitution Treatment , Opioid-Related Disorders/drug therapy , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 653709, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1181405

ABSTRACT

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.3389/fpsyt.2020.00386.].

13.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 653709, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1178046

ABSTRACT

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.3389/fpsyt.2020.00386.].

14.
Front Psychol ; 12: 599136, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1170115

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to determine the relationship between acute stress and quality of life and explore their influencing factors on health care workers. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted, and a sample of 525 health care workers was recruited from 15 hospitals through a convenient sampling method. Participants completed an online self-report questionnaire to assess their acute stress and quality of life. Descriptive and multiple linear regression statistics were used for this analysis. The results regarding acute stress responses varied significantly among the differences in marital status, physical activity, work status, perceived risk of contracting COVID-19, and the expected duration of the pandemic. Moreover, a younger age, lack of physical activity, being a front-line medical staff, and higher acute stress scores indicated a worse quality of life. Healthcare workers' acute stress was negatively correlated with their quality of life. Therefore, the authorities should pay special attention to health care workers' mental health and provide them with timely protection during the pandemic.

15.
BMJ ; 372: n415, 2021 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102165

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess excess all cause and cause specific mortality during the three months (1 January to 31 March 2020) of the coronavirus disease 2019 (covid-19) outbreak in Wuhan city and other parts of China. DESIGN: Nationwide mortality registries. SETTING: 605 urban districts and rural counties in China's nationally representative Disease Surveillance Point (DSP) system. PARTICIPANTS: More than 300 million people of all ages. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Observed overall and weekly mortality rates from all cause and cause specific diseases for three months (1 January to 31 March 2020) of the covid-19 outbreak compared with the predicted (or mean rates for 2015-19) in different areas to yield rate ratio. RESULTS: The DSP system recorded 580 819 deaths from January to March 2020. In Wuhan DSP districts (n=3), the observed total mortality rate was 56% (rate ratio 1.56, 95% confidence interval 1.33 to 1.87) higher than the predicted rate (1147 v 735 per 100 000), chiefly as a result of an eightfold increase in deaths from pneumonia (n=1682; 275 v 33 per 100 000; 8.32, 5.19 to 17.02), mainly covid-19 related, but a more modest increase in deaths from certain other diseases, including cardiovascular disease (n=2347; 408 v 316 per 100 000; 1.29, 1.05 to 1.65) and diabetes (n=262; 46 v 25 per 100 000; 1.83, 1.08 to 4.37). In Wuhan city (n=13 districts), 5954 additional (4573 pneumonia) deaths occurred in 2020 compared with 2019, with excess risks greater in central than in suburban districts (50% v 15%). In other parts of Hubei province (n=19 DSP areas), the observed mortality rates from pneumonia and chronic respiratory diseases were non-significantly 28% and 23% lower than the predicted rates, despite excess deaths from covid-19 related pneumonia. Outside Hubei (n=583 DSP areas), the observed total mortality rate was non-significantly lower than the predicted rate (675 v 715 per 100 000), with significantly lower death rates from pneumonia (0.53, 0.46 to 0.63), chronic respiratory diseases (0.82, 0.71 to 0.96), and road traffic incidents (0.77, 0.68 to 0.88). CONCLUSIONS: Except in Wuhan, no increase in overall mortality was found during the three months of the covid-19 outbreak in other parts of China. The lower death rates from certain non-covid-19 related diseases might be attributable to the associated behaviour changes during lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Adult , China/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Noncommunicable Diseases/mortality , Pneumonia/mortality , Population Surveillance , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , Wounds and Injuries/mortality
16.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 75, 2021 01 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1049959

ABSTRACT

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders is unclear. This study examined the prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms, and their associations with quality of life (QOL) in clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic. This was a multicenter, cross-sectional study. Depressive and anxiety symptoms, insomnia, pain, and QOL were assessed with standardized instruments. A total of 1063 patients were included. The prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms, and combined depressive and anxiety symptoms were 62.3% (95%CI = 59.4-65.2%), 52.4% (95%CI = 49.3-55.4%), and 45.9% (95%CI = 42.9-48.9%), respectively. Patients with depressive and anxiety symptoms had significantly lower QOL than those without (P < 0.01). Binary logistic regression analyses revealed that having depressive symptoms was positively associated with more severe insomnia (OR = 1.29, P < 0.01) and pain (OR = 1.14, P < 0.01), and was negatively associated with other psychiatric diagnoses (except for major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, and organic mental disorder; OR = 0.50, P < 0.01), while having anxiety symptoms was positively associated with severe physical diseases (OR = 1.57, P = 0.02), poor adherence to treatment (OR = 1.50, P < 0.01), and more severe insomnia (OR = 1.15, P < 0.01) and pain (OR = 1.11, P < 0.01). Having combined depression and anxiety symptoms was positively associated with poor adherence to treatment (OR = 1.42, P = 0.02) and more severe insomnia (OR = 1.19, P < 0.01) and pain (OR = 1.15, P < 0.01), and was negatively associated with the diagnosis of schizophrenia (OR = 0.50, P = 0.04) and others (OR = 0.53, P < 0.01). Depressive and anxiety symptoms were common in clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic. Considering the negative impact of these symptoms on QOL, regular screening and appropriate treatment are recommended for this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Pain/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Treatment Adherence and Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Aged , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Severity of Illness Index
17.
Global Health ; 16(1): 119, 2020 12 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pattern of fatigue in older psychiatric patients during the COVID-19 outbreak was unknown. This study examined the prevalence of fatigue and its association with overall quality of life (overall QOL) in clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: This was a multicenter, cross-sectional study. Fatigue, depressive symptoms, pain, insomnia symptoms, and overall QOL were assessed with standardized instruments. RESULTS: A total of 1063 patients were recruited. The prevalence of fatigue was 47.1% (95%CI: 44.1-50.1%). An analysis of covariance revealed that overall QOL was significantly lower in patients with fatigue compared to those without (P = 0.011). A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that more severe depressive symptoms (OR = 1.15, P < 0.001), insomnia symptoms (OR = 1.08, P < 0.001) and pain (OR = 1.43, P < 0.001) were significantly associated with fatigue. CONCLUSIONS: Fatigue is common among clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 outbreak. Considering its negative impact on overall QOL, regular assessment of fatigue and appropriate treatment warrant attention in this subpopulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fatigue/complications , Mental Disorders/complications , Pain/complications , Quality of Life , Severity of Illness Index , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/complications , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/complications , Depression/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/complications , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pain/epidemiology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Social Isolation/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-614

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of novel coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19) has brought enormous physical and psychological pressure on Chinese medical staff. It is extr

19.
Hepatol Int ; 14(5): 733-742, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743772

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Liver injury is found in some of patients with COVID-19. Liver injury of COVID-19 patients based on severity grading and abdominal radiological signs have not been reported until now. The aim of our study is to determine clinical profiles of the patients based on severity grading, describe abdominal radiological signs, and investigate the correlations of the severity with clinical profiles and radiological signs. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included 115 patients with COVID-19 from Jan 2020 to Feb 2020. Medical records of the patients were collected and CT images were reviewed. RESULTS: Common clinical manifestations of patients with COVID-19 were fever (68.70%), cough (56.52%), fatigue (31.30%); some of them had gastrointestinal symptoms (diarrhea, 12.17%; nausea or vomiting 7.83%; inappetence, 7.83%). Abnormal liver function was observed in some of patients with COVID-19. Significant differences in the levels of AST, albumin,CRP were observed among different groups classified by the severity. Common findings of upper abdominal CT scan were liver hypodensity (26.09%) and pericholecystic fat stranding (21.27%); liver hypodensity was more frequently found in critical cases (58.82%). The severity of COVID-19 correlated with semi-quantitative CT score of pulmonary lesions, CT-quantified liver/spleen attenuation ratio in patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Some of the patients with COVID-19 displayed liver damage revealed by liver functional tests and upper abdominal CT imaging, and the severity of COVID-19 patients correlated with some of liver functional tests and CT signs; thus, it will allow an earlier identification of high-risk patients for early effective intervention.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections , Liver Diseases , Liver Function Tests/methods , Liver , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Liver/diagnostic imaging , Liver/metabolism , Liver Diseases/diagnosis , Liver Diseases/epidemiology , Liver Diseases/etiology , Liver Diseases/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
20.
Eur Psychiatry ; 63(1): e65, 2020 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-662151

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 outbreak required the significantly increased working time and intensity for health professionals in China, which may cause stress signs. METHODS: From March 2-13 of 2020, 4,618 health professionals in China were included in an anonymous, self-rated online survey regarding their concerns on exposure to the COVID-19 outbreak. The questionnaires consisted of five parts: basic demographic information and epidemiological exposure; occupational and psychological impact; concerns during the episode; coping strategies; and the Huaxi Emotional-Distress Index (HEI). RESULTS: About 24.2% of respondents experienced high levels of anxiety or/and depressive symptoms since the COVID-19 outbreak. Respondents who worried about their physical health and those who had COVID-19 infected friends or close relatives were more likely to have high HEI levels, than those without these characteristics. Further, family relationship was found to have an independent protective effect against high HEI levels. Their main concerns were that their families would not be cared for and that they would not be able to work properly. Compared to respondents with clear emotional problems, those with somewhat hidden emotional issues adopted more positive coping measures. CONCLUSIONS: About a quarter of medical staff experienced psychological problems during the pandemic of COVID-19. The psychological impact of stressful events was related to worrying about their physical health, having close COVID-19 infected acquaintances and family relationship issues. Therefore, the psychological supprot for medical staff fighting in the COVID-19 pandemic may be needed.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Medical Staff/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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