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1.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; : 2136435, 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087654

ABSTRACT

Studies have shown that patients with chronic liver disease are at a higher risk of contracting novel coronavirus pneumonia than healthy individuals, and many guidelines state that patients with chronic liver disease should be prioritized for COVID-19 vaccination, but there are a few studies on its safety in CLD patients. We aimed to evaluate the safety of the inactivated COVID-19 vaccine in patients with chronic liver disease, and the effect of anxiety on adverse reactions. A questionnaire survey for self-administered post-vaccination adverse reaction monitoring was conducted from June 17, 2021, to August 11, 2021, in patients with chronic liver disease attending a tertiary care hospital in Taizhou, China. We analyzed the data from of a total of 160 participants who scanned the QR code on social media to respond to the questionnaire. The overall incidence of adverse reactions after COVID-19 vaccination in patients with chronic liver disease was 44.4% (71/160), and the most common adverse reaction was local injection site reaction, accounting for 80.3% of adverse reactions (57/71). No serious adverse reactions were reported. Approximately 53.1% of the patients had anxiety about vaccination, and 51.8% of those who felt anxious reported adverse reactions. The safety of COVID-19 vaccination in patients with chronic liver disease is good, and there is a strong association between adverse reactions and vaccine anxiety. Pre-vaccination education for patients with vaccine anxiety and psychological counseling may reduce reports of adverse reactions and improve patients' confidence in the vaccine.

2.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-8, 2022 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2076902

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak has had a devastating impact, and efforts are underway to speed up vaccination. The study's objective was to describe the clinical characteristics of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination clinic in the Second People's Hospital of Fujian Province, China. Meanwhile, we monitored all the vaccine recipients to evaluate adverse reactions. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was done at the COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic, the Second People's Hospital of Fujian Province, China. We systematically collected Clinical data from the COVID-19 vaccination clinic between March 11 and November 11, 2021, including the type of vaccine, number of doses, gender, age, educational level, occupational category, adverse reactions, etc. Investigators will contact vaccine recipients by means of phone call or WeChat message to record the negative responses. Last, this report covers data through 8 mo, so it will be better to Evaluate the Safety of 2 inactivated COVID-19 vaccines from China (BBIBP-CorV [Beijing Institute of Biological Products, Beijing, China] and CoronaVac [Sinovac Life Sciences, Beijing, China]). RESULTS: The results indicated that the Second People's Hospital of Fujian Province received a total of 64,602 COVID-19 vaccines from March 11 to November 11, 2021, including 34,331 (53.14%) first doses, 29,245 (45.27%) second doses, and 1026 (1.59%) third doses. This study found the highest proportion in other personnel (38.69% at the first dose, 38.75% at the second dose, and 2.44% at the third dose), who were mainly retirees. People with higher levels of education are more likely to be vaccinated against COVID-19 during the early stages of vaccine rollout. In terms of age stratification, the highest proportion was found among people aged 18-49 (BBIBP-CorV: first dose 61%, second dose 62.6%, and third dose 76.8%; CoronaVac: first dose 66.1%, double dose 63.6%, and third dose 75.5%), followed by those over 60. The common adverse reactions were mainly local and systemic, and there were some differences between the 2 inactivated vaccines (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to analyze the actual status of hospitals as COVID-19 vaccination clinics in China. The hospital has focused on vaccinating citizens and the initial rollout of vaccines to ensure any safety issues are identified. More citizens are willing to vaccinate in hospitals because of the uncertain safety of the available vaccines and adverse reactions. The good news is that vaccine-related severe adverse events have not been found in the hospital vaccination clinic. The Safety of BBIBP-CorV and CoronaVac is relatively high.

3.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(10)2022 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066624

ABSTRACT

Vaccination is an important measure to control the spread of COVID-19 among elderly high-risk groups; however, the propensity to receive COVID-19 vaccine boosters has not been evaluated in these populations. Here, we aimed to investigate the willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine booster among the elderly chronic disease population in Taizhou, China. A cross-sectional, hospital-based survey was conducted in the outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital between 6 July and 11 August 2021 in Taizhou, China, and the data were uploaded to Wen-Juan-Xing, one of the largest online platforms used to collect survey data in China. The targeted population was non-oncology chronic disease patients aged 60 years and above. The minimum sample size was 229, determined by the G*Power software (v3.1.9.2, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany). A total of 254 patients with valid data were enrolled in this study, with a response rate of 82.5% (254/308). Chi-square tests and one-way binary regression were used to compare the proportions and the degree of influence of categorical factors. The magnitude of the effect for the comparisons was measured by Gramer's V. A multivariate binary logistic regression model was used to correct for confounders and to identify factors. All data were analyzed using SPSS v24.0 (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA). A total of 198 respondents (77.9%) were willing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine booster dose, and 77.6% of respondents were willing to receive the primary dose. Age < 70 years (OR 2.82), stable disease control (OR 2.79), confidence in the effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccine (OR 3.11), and vaccine recipient (OR 5.02) were significantly associated with the willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine booster dose. Promoting primary dose vaccination is essential for advancing booster vaccination, and it is important to focus on elderly patients' confidence in the vaccine, in addition to strengthening health management and promoting disease stability. Follow-up studies should focus on elderly patients who belong to specific disease groups.

4.
Frontiers in public health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2046866

ABSTRACT

China's public health emergency COVID-19 has brought great challenges to food safety. Among them, the quality and safety of agricultural products under the normalization of the COVID-19 prevention and control has become a hot issue of general concern. This study attempts to reveal the driving factors and mechanisms of farmers' green production behavior. The empirical research by collecting 673 sample data shows that: individual characteristics of farmers, government guiding factors, an industrial organization promoting factors, and market adjustment factors have a positive driving effect on farmers' green production behavior. And farmers' green production behavior has a positive influence on the quality and safety of agricultural products. Farmers' green production behavior plays an intermediary role between the quality and safety of agricultural products and individual characteristics of farmers, government guidance factors, industrial organization promotion factors, and market regulation factors. The results of the study have guiding significance for ensuring the quality and safety of agricultural products, promoting ecological environmental protection, and sustainable agricultural development under the normalization of COVID-19 prevention and control.

5.
Am J Health Behav ; 46(4): 423-441, 2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2040332

ABSTRACT

Objectives: From the perspective of media framing, this paper explores how factual frame and influence frame affect the cognition of vaccine effectiveness among Chinese netizens, and how emotions vary in the process and act on the cognition. Methods: We first discuss the theoretical framework and propose hypotheses. Drawing on the cognitive theory of emotions and the Pleasure- Arousal-Dominance (PAD) model, the scale and questionnaire were designed, and used to test the influence of media framing over the cognition of vaccine effectiveness by 2-factor ANOVA and Bootstrap methods. Results: The proposed hypotheses were verified. The perceived effectiveness of domestic vaccines corresponding to the factual frame group was on average 0.19 (95% CI 0.641-0.642) higher than that of the influence frame. The impact on audience cognition from reports of positive tendency was on average 0.642 (95% CI 0.641-0.642) higher than that of negative tendency. The indirect effect of the media frame on the perceived effectiveness through the mediating variable emotion was -0.0923, at the 95% level. Conclusions: The audience can understand the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines better if the factual frame with actual data and authoritative opinions is adopted, rather than reports of the effects of the vaccines on the virus, the vaccinated, and society. Moreover, media reports should be more positive to mitigate the negative emotions, stimulate the arousal of public opinions, and improve audience cognition of report contents, thereby encouraging vaccine uptake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cognition , Emotions , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 9: 770933, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022761

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to explore COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in Chinese adults and analyzed the relationship between knowledge, attitudes, practices (KAP), and COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. Methods: A population-based self-administered online survey was conducted in Taizhou, China to evaluate the population's hesitancy to receive COVID-19 vaccination. A total of 2.463 adults received the invitation for the survey through WeChat (A Chinese app that is used for chat, social media, and mobile payment), and 1.788 interviewees answered the structured questionnaire. The overall response rate was 72.6%. Results: Total 45.2% of people were hesitant about the COVID-19 vaccination. Using binary logistic regression analysis, we found low perception of safety (Model 3: Odds ratio = 2.977, Confidence interval: 2.237-3.963) and efficacy (Model 3: OR = 1.904, 95%CI: 1.462-2.479) of the COVID-19 vaccine in adults is the most important risk factor for COVID-19 vaccine hesitation. People who know more about COVID-19 vaccination are less hesitant (Model 2: OR = 0.967, 95% CI: 0.951-0.983). People who did not seek information independently about the COVID-19 vaccine are more likely to be skeptical (Model 4: OR = 1.300, 95% CI: 1.058-1.598, P = 0.013). Conclusion: In China, the population had higher levels of COVID-19 vaccine hesitation, and their knowledge of the COVID-19 vaccine, perceptions of safety and efficacy, and physical health status were significantly associated with vaccine hesitation. These results provide ideas for promoting COVID-19 vaccination and intervention and have far-reaching implications for further strengthening research on vaccine hesitancy in COVID-19 and exploring strategies for COVID-19 vaccine promotion.

7.
Ann Med ; 54(1): 2376-2384, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2004869

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This research aimed to explore individuals' willingness to pay (WTP) and studied the role of family decision makers in WTP for COVID-19 vaccines. METHODS: A self-administered online questionnaire evaluating the willingness of community residents to pay for booster vaccination of COVID-19 vaccine was conducted among families in a community in Taizhou, China. The logistic regression model was performed to identify the factors associated with WTP for the COVID-19 vaccines, and all data were analysed by R software, version 4.1.0. RESULTS: 44.2% and 43.7% of 824 community residents were willing to pay for the first two doses and the booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, respectively. Decision-makers were more willing to pay for both the first two doses and the boost dose of the COVID-19 vaccines, with OR (95%CI) being 1.75 (1.25-2.47) and 1.89 (1.34-2.67), respectively. Besides, participants' WTP for COVID-19 vaccines were also associated with their occupation and monthly household income. CONCLUSION: This study found that family decision-makers were more willing to pay for both the first two doses and the booster dose of COVID-19 vaccines in Taizhou, China. To improve the WTP for COVID-19 vaccines, public policy programs need to conduct a comprehensive cost-benefit analysis and focus on the role of family decision makers in vaccination.Key MessagesA study evaluating the willingness of community residents to pay for booster vaccination of COVID-19 vaccine was conducted among families in a community in Taizhou, China.Family decision-makers were more willing to pay for both the first two doses and the booster dose of COVID-19 vaccines.To improve the WTP for COVID-19 vaccines, public policy programs need to conduct a comprehensive cost-benefit analysis and focus on the role of family decision-makers in vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination
8.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; : 2099210, 2022 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956541

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted to ascertain whether people in China would be willing to pay for an inactivated COVID-19 vaccine booster dose. An online survey estimating participants' willingness to pay (WTP) for a booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine was conducted in Taizhou, China. The participants received ane-mail or e-poster on WeChat. A total of 1576 subjects participated the survey. A total of 66.4% (1046/1576) of the respondents were willing to pay for a booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine for themselves. Using binary logistic regression analysis, the following factors were significantly related to a WTP for a booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine: 1) confidence in the safety of the COVID-19 vaccines (high vs. low, OR: 4.30, 95%CI: 1.61-11.43), 2) confidence in the preventive effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 virus (moderate vs. little, OR: 1.76, 95%CI: 1.30-2.38; great vs. little, OR: 2.244, 95%CI: 1.62-3.12), and 3) COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy (unhesitant vs. very unhesitant, OR: 0.67, 95%CI: 0.45-1.02; hesitant vs. very unhesitant, OR: 0.29, 95%CI: 0.19-0.44; very hesitant vs. very unhesitant, OR: 0.09, 95%CI: 0.03-0.27). This study revealed that a moderate proportion of participants responded that they would be willing to pay for a booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine. These findings suggest the importance of a detailed assessment and a health education plan that better understands the population's risk perception as well as the potential health risks in China.

9.
Front Public Health ; 10: 865046, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952800

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the social environment of most individuals around the world and has profoundly impacted people's lives, ontological security, and behavior. Among them, the patients are one of the groups most influenced by the pandemic. Objective: The present research aimed to study the relationship of COVID-19 pandemic-induced disruption to patients' daily lives, ontological security, and patients' responses to prevent the spread of COVID-19, and explore the role of ontological security. Methods: This article was based on an online structured questionnaire study conducted among hospitalized patients in Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province, Taizhou, China, from 8 July to 11 August 2021. We analyzed the data using the multivariate regression model and mediation analysis method. Results: The results showed that the higher the pandemic-induced disruption to inpatients' lives, the better behavior would be taken by hospitalized patients to prevent the spread of COVID-19, and the perceived scarcity of ontological security played a mediating role in this process. Higher pandemic-induced disruption to patients' lives increased the ontological insecurity which further, in turn, reduced patients' good practice toward measures to prevent the novel coronavirus. Conclusion: These findings provided direct evidence for the relationship between pandemic-induced disruption, scarcity of ontological security, and patients' prevention behavior. It suggested that there was a need to emphasize patients' ontological security. Overall, these findings suggested that it is important to emphasize the mental health among patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, and implement strategies to offer psychological support when needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Sustainability ; 14(13):7752, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1934227

ABSTRACT

Background: Tobacco use is a global public health concern due to its association with a myriad of health hazards and costs. Previous studies have found that the disinhibiting influence of alcohol consumption may lead to an increase in tobacco use. In this study, we investigated why alcohol consumption is associated with tobacco use among older adults in Western China, and we attempted to explain the mechanisms that underlie the link between alcohol consumption and tobacco use. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we employed a representative sample of 812 urban individuals aged 60 and older in 2017 in Western China. Results: We found that alcohol consumption (OR = 2.816, 95%CI: 1.770–4.479) was positively associated with tobacco use. Additionally, other factors, including gender (OR = 0.023, 95%CI: 0.009–0.060), age (OR = 0.758, 95%CI: 0.634–0.906), health literacy (OR = 0.977, 95%CI: 0.959–0.995) and functional impairment (OR = 0.871, 95%CI: 0.767–0.988) were also strongly related to tobacco use. Conclusions: Consistent with the results of existing studies, our findings demonstrated the disinhibiting influence of alcohol consumption on tobacco use, which confirmed the theoretical mechanisms that underlie the alcohol–tobacco link and implied the co-occurrence and co-use of alcohol and tobacco, which are used as “social lubricants” in the Chinese context. The importance of other factors related to tobacco use were also discussed. As the tobacco epidemic is combatted, joint interventions tailored to concurrent control over alcohol and tobacco need to be performed, and corresponding male-specific and age-specific health education and the reinforcement of health literacy must be considered as important priorities.

11.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(5): 2088966, 2022 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1895725

ABSTRACT

A lack of confidence on the vaccination drive hinders the management of the COVID-19 pandemic. We aimed to assess the antibody response to the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine among hospitalized patients in China. This case-control study was based on SARS-CoV-2 sero-surveillance during hospitalization. From April to June 2021, hospitalized patients without documented COVID-19 infection from the Department of Urology were routinely assayed for anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. The SARS-CoV-2 vaccination history of each participant was obtained from their vaccination records. Of the 405 participants, there were 37 seropositive participants (case group) and 368 seronegative participants (control group); 68 participants (16.8%) had received the inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, including 54 who received the Sinovac-CoronaVac vaccine and 14 received the Sinopharm vaccine. All seropositive participants who had received one or two doses of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine were assessed for at least 16 days, while 31 (8.4%) of 368 seronegative controls who had received the vaccine were tested for 1-94 days. The overall seroconversion rate was 54.4% (37/68) in the vaccinated participants who received the inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. The odds ratio (OR) and confidence interval (CI) for seropositivity was 6.20 (95% CI: 2.05-18.71) in those received full vaccination with two doses versus those partially vaccinated participants with one dose after adjusting for sex and age. These findings imply that the inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine could have a protective antibody response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibody Formation , Case-Control Studies , COVID-19/prevention & control , Antibodies, Viral
12.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(5): 2082171, 2022 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1886351

ABSTRACT

Studies have identified teacher effects on students' attitudes. This study explored the differences in and associations between teachers' and students' COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, and the factors that affect it. A population-based self-administered online survey was conducted to evaluate the COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy of teachers and students in a college in Taizhou, China. A total of 835 valid questionnaires were obtained. All data were analyzed using IBM SPSS statistics 26.0 software. The proportions of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy for teachers and students were 31.7%, and 23.8%, respectively. In the binary logistic regression analysis, teachers who perceived the safety of the COVID-19 vaccine as low (OR = 6.794 , 95%CI: 1.701-27.143), did not pay continuous attention to the vaccine news (OR = 3.498, 95%CI: 1.150-10.640), and suffered chronic diseases (OR = 2.659, 95%CI: 1.135-6.227) were more likely to hesitate to get vaccinated against COVID-19. The group of students who perceived the COVID-19 vaccine safety as being low (OR = 1.805, 95%CI: 1.094-2.979) were more hesitant to get the COVID-19 vaccine. While both teachers and students were hesitant about the COVID-19 vaccine, teachers were found to be more so. Perceptions regarding the safety of COVID-19 vaccines, attention to and awareness of vaccine news, and chronic medical conditions were the main factors that influenced the hesitation regarding COVID-19 vaccines. Therefore, students' vaccine hesitancy may depend largely on the perceptions of the vaccine's safety rather than teachers' vaccine hesitancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination Hesitancy , Parents/education , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Students , China , Vaccination
13.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(5): 2063629, 2022 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1830889

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We explored the willingness to pay for booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine among health-care workers in Taizhou, China. METHODS: A population-based self-administered online questionnaire evaluating the willingness of health-care workers to pay for booster vaccination of COVID-19 vaccine was conducted in Taizhou, China. Of the 1102 health-care workers received the invitation, 1072 (97.3%) had received twice vaccination of COVID-19 vaccine. RESULTS: There were 1569 (53.1%) out of 1072 health-care workers not willing to pay for thebooster dose of COVID-19 vaccines, 348 (32.5%) were willing to pay less than 100CHY for the booster dose of COVID-19 vaccines, only 155 (14.5%) were willing to pay more than 100 CHY. The factors related to willingness to pay for booster dose of COVID-19 vaccines were education level (c2 = 9.42, P = .01) or whether they had adverse effect to COVID-19 vaccines (c2 = 11.87, P < .01) . CONCLUSION: This study found that about half of health-care workers were willing to pay for booster dose of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in Taizhou, China, most of them are willing to pay less than 100 CHY. Health-care workers' willingness to pay for booster dose of COVID-19 vaccines were related to sex, education level, whether they had adverse effect to COVID-19 vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
14.
One Health ; 14: 100395, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819579

ABSTRACT

Background: South Africa was the first country with a case of Omicron variant infection diagnosed; therefore, this study aimed to elucidate the impact of the Omicron mutant strain outbreak on the health behavior of the South African population and encourage the population to adopt timely protective behaviors against Omicron mutant strain infection. Study design and methods: This was a population-based, cross-sectional study conducted in Cape Town, South Africa, in December 2021. We distributed 300 questionnaires to adults aged >18 years, and they were all returned. Results: Of the South African population, 60.3% expressed a high level of concern regarding Omicron; 89.3% improved on at least one of the following three health behaviors: mask-wearing, washing hands, and reducing socialization; and only 10.7% exhibited no improvement in health behaviors. Of these, 71.3% and 57.0% increased the length of time they wore a mask and washed their hands, respectively, and 47% decreased the number of times they socialized. Age, residence, education level, chronic disease, and whether they had received the COVID-19 vaccine were significantly different (p < 0.05) between the presence and absence of enhanced health behaviors. The levels of concern and knowledge regarding the Omicron virus significantly influenced health-behavior change (all P < 0.05). Conclusion: There has been a positive change in the South African population toward adopting mask-wearing, hand washing, and reducing socialization in response to the Omicron virus strain epidemic. Based on one health approach, it is important to focus on populations with chronic diseases, those who have not yet received the COVID-19 vaccine, and other populations with low rates of health behavior change.

15.
J Med Virol ; 94(5): 1967-1975, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1777577

ABSTRACT

We aimed to assess whether blood glucose control can be used as predictors for the severity of 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and to improve the management of diabetic patients with COVID-19. A two-center cohort with a total of 241 confirmed cases of COVID-19 with definite outcomes was studied. After the diagnosis of COVID-19, the clinical data and laboratory results were collected, the fasting blood glucose levels were followed up at initial, middle stage of admission and discharge, the severity of the COVID-19 was assessed at any time from admission to discharge. Hyperglycemia patients with COVID-19 were divided into three groups: good blood glucose control, fair blood glucose control, and blood glucose deterioration. The relationship of blood glucose levels, blood glucose control status, and severe COVID-19 were analyzed by univariate and multivariable regression analysis. In our cohort, 21.16% were severe cases and 78.84% were nonsevere cases. Admission hyperglycemia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.938; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.387-2.707), mid-term hyperglycemia (aOR, 1.758; 95% CI, 1.325-2.332), and blood glucose deterioration (aOR, 22.783; 95% CI, 2.661-195.071) were identified as the risk factors of severe COVID-19. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, reaching an area under ROC curve of 0.806, and a sensitivity and specificity of 80.40% and 68.40%, respectively, revealed that hyperglycemia on admission and blood glucose deterioration of diabetic patients are potential predictive factors for severe COVID-19. Our results indicated that admission hyperglycemia and blood glucose deterioration were positively correlated with the risk factor for severe COVID-19, and deterioration of blood glucose may be more likely to the occurrence of severe illness in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Hyperglycemia , Blood Glucose/analysis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Humans , Hyperglycemia/epidemiology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
16.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(1): 2029257, 2022 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692309

ABSTRACT

This study is conducted to explore the association between health behaviors and the COVID-19 vaccination based on the risk compensation concept among health-care workers in Taizhou, China. We conducted a self-administered online survey to estimate the health behaviors among the staff in a tertiary hospital in Taizhou, China, from May 18 to 21 May 2021. A total of 592 out of 660 subjects (89.7%) responded to the questionnaire after receiving an e-poster on WeChat. Subjects who had been inoculated with the COVID-19 vaccine were asked to mention the differences in their health behaviors before and after the vaccination. The results showed that there were no statistical differences in health behaviors between vaccinated and unvaccinated groups, except in terms of the type of gloves they used (62.8% in the vaccinated group and 49.2% in the unvaccinated group, p = .048). Subjects who received earlier COVID-19 vaccinations exhibited better health behaviors (22.40% increased for duration of wearing masks (P = .007), 25.40% increased for times of washing hands (P = .01), and 20.90% increased for times of wearing gloves (P = .01)). Subjects also revealed better health behaviors (washing hands, wearing gloves, and wearing masks) after vaccination compared to that before. In conclusion, concept of risk compensation was not applied in our findings. The health behaviors did not reduce after the COVID-19 vaccination, which even may improve health behaviors among health-care workers in the hospital setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
17.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325438

ABSTRACT

Background: Emergencies and their associated negative emotions have a great effect on public health. As a key part of the emergency management, government information release (GIR) not only meets the public's health information seeking, but also helps to eliminate the breeding and spreading of negative social emotions. Method: From the two aspects of content features and lingual forms, a regression model was built to explore the mechanism of GIR on the regulation of netizens' negative emotions by adopting the theoretical methods of content analysis, emotion calculation, and case analysis. Results: During the emergency outbreak, if the government can timely release information on the incident and respond to the public using rational language, netizens' negative emotions can be alleviated. During the emergency peak, the government should release the event progress, resolution and disposal information to improve the recognition of netizens and eliminate negative emotions. Conclusions: According to different stages of emergencies, the government should timely and reasonably utilize the attitude tendency, content type and lingual form of GIR to effectively regulate the negative emotions of netizens.

18.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325152

ABSTRACT

Extreme public health interventions play a critical role in mitigating the local and global prevalence and pandemic potential of COVID-19. Here, we use population size for pathogen transmission to measure the intensity of public health interventions, which is a key characteristic variable for nowcasting and forecasting of the epidemic. By formulating a hidden Markov dynamic system and using nonlinear filtering theory, we have developed a stochastic epidemic dynamic model under public health interventions. The model parameters and states are estimated in time from internationally available public data by combining an unscented filter and an interacting multiple model filter. Moreover, we consider the computability of the population size and provide its selection criterion. We estimate the mean of the basic reproductive number of China and the rest of the globe except China (GEC) to be 2.46 (95% CI: 2.41-2.51) and 3.64 (95% CI: (3.55-3.72), respectively. We infer that the number of latent infections of GEC is about 7.47*10

19.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315384

ABSTRACT

Background: Characteristics of registered systematic reviews (SRs) on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remain unclear. This study aimed to analyze research collaboration, interventions, and outcomes in registered SRs of TCM associated with COVID-19. Methods: : PROSPERO was searched to obtain SRs of TCM related to COVID-19 up to July 1, 2020. VOSviewer 1.6.14 software was used to generate network maps for countries, institutions, and provinces. Results: : A total of 80 SRs were included, which were registered by 81 institutions from 6 countries. China (76, 95.00%) was the country with the highest output. 21 provinces in China contributed to the registration of SRs, Sichuan (25, 30.12%), Beijing (13, 15.66%), and Shaanxi (7, 8.43%) were the top three productive provinces. The top three productive institutions were Chengdu University of traditional Chinese medicine (18, 24.66%), Shaanxi University of traditional Chinese medicine (7, 9.59%), and Beijing University of traditional Chinese medicine (6, 8.22%). Collaborations among countries, provinces, and institutions were sparse. Interventions investigated included traditional Chinese medicine, integrated Chinese and Western medicine, acupuncture, and Taijiquan, but the description was brief, and no specific implementation plan was provided. The most frequently used primary outcome was clinical efficiency (45, 56.25%), and the most frequently used secondary outcome was the adverse event (50, 62.5%). The expression of the outcomes was not standardized. Conclusions: : Although there were some collaborations between provinces and institutions, cooperation between countries should be further strengthened. The identified deficiencies in interventions and outcomes should be given more attention by future researchers.

20.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-312501

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) spread throughout the world and caused hundreds of thousands of infected people to death. However, the pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS COV-2) is poorly understood. The objective of this study is to retrospectively explore the pathogenesis of COVID-19 from clinical laboratory findings, taking disease progression into account. Methods: A single-centered, retrospective study was carried out, which included moderate (n=76) and severe COVID-19 cases (n=22). The difference of laboratory findings from blood routine examination and hepatorenal function test were retrospectively evaluated between the state of moderate and severe. The disease progression was indicated by oxygenation index. Results: Age is a risk factor for disease progression from moderate to severe. Lymphocytopenia, neutrophilia, liver and kidney function decreasement occurred in severe patients on admission, compared with moderate patients. Lymphocytopenia and neutrophilia deteriorated at the lowest oxygenation index timepoint in the severe patients. And the oxygenation index was associated with ratio of lymphocyte and neutrophil in COVID-19 patients. Conclusions: Lymphocytopenia and neutrophilia, which deteriorate in the progression of severe patients, are the main pathogenesis of COVID-19. More measures need to be taken to control lymphocytopenia and neutrophilia in severe COVID-19. Oxygenation index presented potentiality as predictor on the progression of COVID-19.

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