Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 10 de 10
Filter
2.
Front Public Health ; 10: 808264, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699555

ABSTRACT

From the perspective of positive youth development, developmental assets and self-control play critical roles in promoting adolescent development. However, their effects have not been evaluated in the current issue, internet gaming disorder (IGD). IGD is gradually becoming an important social problem among worldwide youth and has been included in the eleventh International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). Therefore, the present study was determined to investigate the relationship between developmental assets, self-control, and IGD. A two-wave longitudinal study, with each wave spanning half a year apart, was conducted in a sample of 1023 adolescents (aging from 11 to 15, 49.36% boys) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results of the moderated mediation model revealed that T1 developmental assets could predict less IGD at T2 directly or through T1 self-control indirectly. Furthermore, the moderating effect of gender was not significant in the mediation model. Overall, adolescents who experience more developmental assets are less likely to suffer IGD. Moreover, developmental assets are conducive to developing a higher level of self-control, which in turn contributes to preventing or intervening in IGD as well. Therefore, measures should be taken to construct developmental assets to prevent or reduce IGD during adolescence.


Subject(s)
Behavior, Addictive , COVID-19 , Self-Control , Video Games , Adolescent , Behavior, Addictive/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Internet Addiction Disorder , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323518

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection induces new-onset diabetes and severe metabolic complications of pre-existing diabetes. The pathogenic mechanism underlying this is incompletely understood. Here, we provided evidence linking circulating GP73 with the exaggerated gluconeogenesis triggered by SARS-CoV-2 infection. We found that SARS-CoV-2 infection or glucotoxic conditions increased GP73 production and secretion. Secreted GP73 then trafficked to the liver and kidney to stimulate gluconeogenesis through the cAMP/PKA pathway. By using global phosphoproteomics, we found a drastic remodeling of the PKA kinase hub exerted by GP73. Notably, plasma GP73 levels were elevated and positively correlated with blood glucose in patients with COVID19 and diabetes. Neutralization of circulating GP73 in serum of individuals infected with SARS-CoV-2 or with diabetes reduced excessive gluconeogenesis in cultured hepatocytes, and lowered blood glucose levels in animal models of diabetes. Ablation of GP73 from whole animals has a profound glucose-lowering effect secondary to reduced gluconeogenesis. Thus, GP73 is a key glucogenic hormone contributing to SARS-CoV-2-induced glucose abnormality.

4.
Nat Metab ; 4(1): 29-43, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612214

ABSTRACT

Severe cases of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are associated with elevated blood glucose levels and metabolic complications. However, the molecular mechanisms for how SARS-CoV-2 infection alters glycometabolic control are incompletely understood. Here, we connect the circulating protein GP73 with enhanced hepatic gluconeogenesis during SARS-CoV-2 infection. We first demonstrate that GP73 secretion is induced in multiple tissues upon fasting and that GP73 stimulates hepatic gluconeogenesis through the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. We further show that GP73 secretion is increased in cultured cells infected with SARS-CoV-2, after overexpression of SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid and spike proteins and in lungs and livers of mice infected with a mouse-adapted SARS-CoV-2 strain. GP73 blockade with an antibody inhibits excessive glucogenesis stimulated by SARS-CoV-2 in vitro and lowers elevated fasting blood glucose levels in infected mice. In patients with COVID-19, plasma GP73 levels are elevated and positively correlate with blood glucose levels. Our data suggest that GP73 is a glucogenic hormone that likely contributes to SARS-CoV-2-induced abnormalities in systemic glucose metabolism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Glucose/metabolism , Hyperglycemia/etiology , Hyperglycemia/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Biomarkers , Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases/metabolism , Diet, High-Fat , Disease Models, Animal , Fasting , Gene Expression , Gluconeogenesis/drug effects , Gluconeogenesis/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Hyperglycemia/blood , Liver/metabolism , Liver/pathology , Membrane Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Membrane Proteins/blood , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Organ Specificity/genetics
6.
J Nurs Manag ; 29(5): 1263-1274, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1044641

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To explore the association between cognitive emotion regulation strategies and anxiety and depression among nurses during the COVID-19 outbreak. BACKGROUND: Nurses play a vital role in responding to the COVID-19 outbreak, but many of them suffer from psychological problems due to the excessive workload and stress. Understanding the correlation between cognitive emotion regulation strategies and anxiety and depression will promote targeted psychosocial interventions for these affected nurses. METHODS: This cross-sectional study of 586 nurses was conducted in Eastern China. Participants completed online questionnaires that investigated anxiety, depression and cognitive emotion regulation strategies. RESULTS: The prevalence of nurses' anxiety and depression was 27.6% and 32.8%, respectively. Lower self-blame, rumination and catastrophizing, as well as greater acceptance and positive refocusing, were related to fewer symptoms of anxiety or depression. CONCLUSION: The cognitive emotion regulation strategies of acceptance and positive refocusing contribute to reducing anxiety or depression. These strategies should be considered when implementing psychotherapeutic interventions to improve nurses' adverse emotional symptoms. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: This study highlights the need to assess cognitive emotion regulation strategies use in screening for anxiety and depression. Nurse managers should develop psychosocial interventions including appropriate strategies to help nurses with adverse emotions during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emotional Regulation , Nurses , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , China , Cognition , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Emotions , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Nat Metab ; 2(12): 1391-1400, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947555

ABSTRACT

Responsible for the ongoing coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infects host cells through binding of the viral spike protein (SARS-2-S) to the cell-surface receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Here we show that the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) scavenger receptor B type 1 (SR-B1) facilitates ACE2-dependent entry of SARS-CoV-2. We find that the S1 subunit of SARS-2-S binds to cholesterol and possibly to HDL components to enhance viral uptake in vitro. SR-B1 expression facilitates SARS-CoV-2 entry into ACE2-expressing cells by augmenting virus attachment. Blockade of the cholesterol-binding site on SARS-2-S1 with a monoclonal antibody, or treatment of cultured cells with pharmacological SR-B1 antagonists, inhibits HDL-enhanced SARS-CoV-2 infection. We further show that SR-B1 is coexpressed with ACE2 in human pulmonary tissue and in several extrapulmonary tissues. Our findings reveal that SR-B1 acts as a host factor that promotes SARS-CoV-2 entry and may help explain viral tropism, identify a possible molecular connection between COVID-19 and lipoprotein metabolism, and highlight SR-B1 as a potential therapeutic target to interfere with SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Lipoproteins, HDL/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Scavenger Receptors, Class B/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Cell Line , Cholesterol/metabolism , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Protein Binding , Receptors, Virus , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Tropism , Virus Attachment
8.
Adv Wound Care (New Rochelle) ; 9(7): 357-364, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-627115

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the prevalence, characteristics, and preventive status of skin injuries caused by personal protective equipment (PPE) in medical staff. Approach: A cross-sectional survey was conducted online for understanding skin injuries among medical staff fighting COVID-19 in February 8-22, 2020. Participants voluntarily answered and submitted the questionnaire with cell phone. The questionnaire items included demographic data, grade of PPE and daily wearing time, skin injury types, anatomical sites, and preventive measures. Univariable analyses and logistic regression analyses were used to explore the risk factors associated with skin injuries. Results: A total of 4,308 respondents were collected from 161 hospitals and 4,306 respondents were valid. The overall prevalence of skin injuries was 42.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 41.30-44.30) with three types of device-related pressure injuries, moist-associated skin damage, and skin tear. Co-skin injuries and multiple location injuries were 27.4% and 76.8%, respectively. The logistic regression analysis indicated that sweating (95% CI for odds ratio [OR] 87.52-163.11), daily wearing time (95% CI for OR 1.61-3.21), male (95% CI for OR 1.11-2.13), and grade 3 PPE (95% CI for OR 1.08-2.01) were associated with skin injuries. Only 17.7% of respondents took prevention and 45.0% of skin injuries were treated. Innovation: This is the first cross-sectional survey to understand skin injuries in medical staff caused by PPE, which is expected to be a benchmark. Conclusion: The skin injuries among medical staff are serious, with insufficient prevention and treatment. A comprehensive program should be taken in the future.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Medical Staff , Occupational Injuries , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral , Skin/injuries , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Odds Ratio , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Prevalence , Respiratory Protective Devices , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Int J Lab Hematol ; 42(6): 766-772, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615842

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Characteristics of blood coagulation and its relation to clinical outcomes in COVID-19 patients are still rarely reported. We aimed to investigate the blood coagulation function and its influences on clinical outcomes of patients with syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. METHODS: A total of 71 severe patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection who were treated in Wuhan First Hospital from February 12 to March 20, 2020, were enrolled. The blood coagulation data in these patients and in 61 healthy controls were collected. The patients with COVID-19 were divided into two groups: the aggravated group and the nonaggravated group, respectively, basing on whether the patients' conditions turned to critically ill or not after admission. RESULTS: Compared with healthy controls, patients with COVID-19 had significant performances with coagulation dysfunction, including dramatically elevated values of FIB, PT, APTT, INR, FDP, and D-Dimers but markedly reduced AT value (P < .05). Importantly, more noteworthy coagulation disorders similar to the differences between patients and controls were found in the aggravated patients with conditions deterioration after admission than those in the nonaggravated patients without conditions deterioration (P < .05). Moreover, the aggravated patients possessed a longer hospital stay and a higher mortality compared with the nonaggravated patients (P < .001). The coagulation parameters of COVID-19 patients were widely and closely related to the indexes of liver function and inflammation (P < .05), indicating the coagulation dysfunction of these patients may be caused by liver injury and inflammatory storm. CONCLUSION: Severe patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection often possess coagulation dysfunction on admission. A certain correlation exists in coagulation disorder and adverse clinical outcome among severe COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Aged , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Tests , Blood Proteins/analysis , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Liver Function Tests , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
10.
Int Wound J ; 17(5): 1300-1309, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-245059

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, the medical staff fighting against COVID-19 frequently reported the device-related pressure injury (DRPI) caused by personal protective equipment (PPE). We conducted a cross-sectional survey online to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of DRPI among medical staff. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were employed to explore the risk factors associated with DRPI. A total of 4308 participants were collected and 4306 participants were valid from 161 hospitals in China. The overall prevalence of DRPI caused by PPE among medical staff was 30.03% (95% CI 28.69%-31.41%). The prevalence of male was more than that of female (42.25%, 95% CI 37.99-46.51% vs 26.36%, 95% CI 26.93-29.80%, P < .001).The categories were mainly stages 1 and 2, and the common anatomical locations were nose bridge, cheeks, ears, and forehead. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk factors were sweating (OR = 43.99, 95% CI 34.46-56.17), male (OR = 1.50, 95% CI 1.12-1.99), level 3 PPE (OR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.14-1.83), and longer wearing time (OR = 1.28, 95% CI 0.97-1.68). The prevalence of DRPI was high among medical staff wearing PPE against COVID-19, and the risk factors were sweating, male, wearing level 3 PPE, and longer wearing time. Comprehensive preventive interventions should be taken.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Medical Staff, Hospital , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Occupational Injuries/etiology , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Facial Injuries/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Sweating , Time Factors
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL