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1.
Reviews in medical virology ; : e2418, 2023.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2173441

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues, and the death toll continues to surge. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the efficacy of anakinra on mortality in patients with COVID-19. A systematic search was made of PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and clinicaltrials.gov, without language restrictions. Randomized controlled trials on treatment of COVID-19 with anakinra, compared with placebo or blank, were reviewed. Studies were pooled to risk ratios (RRs), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Five Randomized controlled trials (enrolling 1859 participants) met the inclusion criteria. There was no statistically significant difference in 14-day mortality (RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.43-1.39;P = 0.40), 28-day mortality (RR 1.06, 95% CI 0.89-1.26;P = 0.51), and 90-day mortality (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.73-1.39;P = 0.97) between the two groups. Sensitivity analyses further confirmed these results. Anakinra was not associated with reduced mortality in hospitalised patients with COVID-19. Anakinra probably should not be used routinely in COVID-19 patients.

2.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 9: CD013519, 2022 09 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2047399

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Overactive bladder is a common, long-term symptom complex, which includes frequency of micturition, urgency with or without associated incontinence and nocturia. Around 11% of the population have symptoms, with this figure increasing with age. Symptoms can be linked to social anxiety and adaptive behavioural change. The cost of treating overactive bladder is considerable, with current treatments varying in effectiveness and being associated with side effects. Acupuncture has been suggested as an alternative treatment. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of acupuncture for treating overactive bladder in adults, and to summarise the principal findings of relevant economic evaluations. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Specialised Register, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (including In-Process, Epub Ahead of Print, Daily), ClinicalTrials.gov and WHO ICTRP (searched 14 May 2022). We also searched the Allied and Complementary Medicine database (AMED) and bibliographic databases where knowledge of the Chinese language was necessary: China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI); Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database (VIP) and WANFANG (China Online Journals), as well as the reference lists of relevant articles.  SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs and cross-over RCTs assessing the effects of acupuncture for treating overactive bladder in adults. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Four review authors formed pairs to assess study eligibility and extract data. Both pairs used Covidence software to perform screening and data extraction. We assessed risk of bias using Cochrane's risk of bias tool and assessed heterogeneity using the Chi2 testand I2 statistic generated within the meta-analyses. We used a fixed-effect model within the meta-analyses unless there was a moderate or high level of heterogeneity, where we employed a random-effects model. We used the GRADE approach to assess the certainty of evidence. MAIN RESULTS: We included 15 studies involving 1395 participants in this review (14 RCTs and one quasi-RCT). All included studies raised some concerns regarding risk of bias. Blinding of participants to treatment group was only achieved in 20% of studies, we considered blinding of outcome assessors and allocation concealment to be low risk in only 25% of the studies, and random sequence generation to be either unclear or high risk in more than 50% of the studies. Acupuncture versus no treatment One study compared acupuncture to no treatment. The evidence is very uncertain regarding the effect of acupuncture compared to no treatment in curing or improving overactive bladder symptoms and on the number of minor adverse events (both very low-certainty evidence). The study report explicitly stated that no major adverse events occurred. The study did not report on the presence or absence of urinary urgency, episodes of urinary incontinence, daytime urinary frequency or episodes of nocturia. Acupuncture versus sham acupuncture Five studies compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture. The evidence is very uncertain about the effect of acupuncture on curing or improving overactive bladder symptoms compared to sham acupuncture (standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.03 to 0.31; 3 studies; 151 participants; I2 = 65%; very low-certainty evidence). All five studies explicitly stated that there were no major adverse events observed during the study. Moderate-certainty evidence suggests that acupuncture probably makes no difference to the incidence of minor adverse events compared to sham acupuncture (risk ratio (RR) 1.28, 95% CI 0.30 to 5.36; 4 studies; 222 participants; I² = 0%). Only one small study reported data for the presence or absence of urgency and for episodes of nocturia. The evidence is of very low certainty for both of these outcomes and in both cases the lower confidence interval is implausible. Moderate-certainty evidence suggests there is probably little or no difference in episodes of urinary incontinence between acupuncture and sham acupuncture (mean difference (MD) 0.55, 95% CI -1.51 to 2.60; 2 studies; 121 participants; I2 = 57%). Two studies recorded data regarding daytime urinary frequency but we could not combine them in a meta-analysis due to differences in methodologies (very low-certainty evidence). Acupuncture versus medication Eleven studies compared acupuncture with medication. Low-certainty evidence suggests that acupuncture may slightly increase how many people's overactive bladder symptoms are cured or improved compared to medication (RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.43; 5 studies; 258 participants; I2 = 19%). Low-certainty evidence suggests that acupuncture may reduce the incidence of minor adverse events when compared to medication (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.45; 8 studies; 1004 participants; I² = 51%). The evidence is uncertain regarding the effect of acupuncture on the presence or absence of urinary urgency (MD -0.40, 95% CI -0.56 to -0.24; 2 studies; 80 participants; I2 = 0%; very low-certainty evidence) and episodes of urinary incontinence (MD -0.33, 95% CI -2.75 to 2.09; 1 study; 20 participants; very low-certainty evidence) compared to medication. Low-certainty evidence suggests there may be little to no effect of acupuncture compared to medication in terms of daytime urinary frequency (MD 0.73, 95% CI -0.39 to 1.85; 4 studies; 360 participants; I2 = 28%). Acupuncture may slightly reduce the number of nocturia episodes compared to medication (MD -0.50, 95% CI -0.65 to -0.36; 2 studies; 80 participants; I2 = 0%, low-certainty evidence). There were no incidences of major adverse events in any of the included studies. However, major adverse events are rare in acupuncture trials and the numbers included in this review may be insufficient to detect these events. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The evidence is very uncertain about the effect acupuncture has on cure or improvement of overactive bladder symptoms compared to no treatment. It is uncertain if there is any difference between acupuncture and sham acupuncture in cure or improvement of overactive bladder symptoms. This review provides low-certainty evidence that acupuncture may result in a slight increase in cure or improvement of overactive bladder symptoms when compared with medication and may reduce the incidence of minor adverse events. These conclusions must remain tentative until the completion of larger, higher-quality studies that use relevant, comparable outcomes. Timing and frequency of treatment, point selection, application and long-term follow-up are other areas relevant for research.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy , Nocturia , Urinary Bladder Diseases , Urinary Bladder, Overactive , Urinary Incontinence , Adult , Humans , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Acupuncture Therapy/methods , Urinary Bladder, Overactive/therapy , Urinary Incontinence/therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
3.
Cell Mol Immunol ; 19(11): 1317-1318, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008270

Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sepsis , Humans
4.
World J Pediatr ; 18(8): 545-552, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1943236

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Human adenovirus (HAdV) infection can cause a variety of diseases. It is a major pathogen of pediatric acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) and can be life-threatening in younger children. We described the epidemiology and subtypes shifting of HAdV among children with ARI in Guangzhou, China. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of 161,079 children diagnosed with acute respiratory illness at the Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center between 2010 and 2021. HAdV specimens were detected by real-time PCR and the hexon gene was used for phylogenetic analysis. RESULTS: Before the COVID-19 outbreak in Guangzhou, the annual frequency of adenovirus infection detected during this period ranged from 3.92% to 13.58%, with an epidemic peak every four to five years. HAdV demonstrated a clear seasonal distribution, with the lowest positivity in March and peaking during summer (July or August) every year. A significant increase in HAdV cases was recorded for 2018 and 2019, which coincided with a shift in the dominant HAdV subtype from HAdV-3 to HAdV-7. The latter was associated with a more severe disease compared to HAdV-3. The average mortality proportion for children infected with HAdV from 2016 to 2019 was 0.38% but increased to 20% in severe cases. After COVID-19 emerged, HAdV cases dropped to 2.68%, suggesting that non-pharmaceutical interventions probably reduced the transmission of HAdV in the community. CONCLUSION: Our study provides the foundation for the understanding of the epidemiology of HAdV and its associated risks in children in Southern China.


Subject(s)
Adenovirus Infections, Human , Adenoviruses, Human , COVID-19 , Respiratory Tract Infections , Adenovirus Infections, Human/diagnosis , Adenovirus Infections, Human/epidemiology , Adenoviruses, Human/genetics , Child , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Molecular Epidemiology , Phylogeny , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies
5.
Anal Chem ; 94(5): 2510-2516, 2022 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655403

ABSTRACT

Neutralization assays that can measure neutralizing antibodies in serum are vital for large-scale serodiagnosis and vaccine evaluation. Here, we establish multiplexed lab-on-a-chip bioassays for testing antibodies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and its variants. Compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), our method exhibits a low consumption of sample and reagents (10 µL), a low limit of detection (LOD: 0.08 ng/mL), a quick sample-to-answer time (about 70 min), and multiplexed ability (5 targets in each of 7 samples in one assay). We can also increase the throughput as needed. The concentrations of antibodies against RBD, D614G, N501Y, E484K, and L452R/E484Q-mutants after two doses of vaccines are 6.6 ± 3.6, 8.7 ± 4.6, 3.4 ± 2.8, 3.8 ± 2.8, and 2.8 ± 2.3 ng/mL, respectively. This suggests that neutralizing activities against N501Y, E484K, and L452R/E484Q-mutants were less effective than RBD and D614G-mutant. We performed a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) for all volunteers. Compared with PRNT, our assay is fast, accurate, inexpensive, and multiplexed with multiple-sample processing ability, which is good for large-scale serodiagnosis and vaccine evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Biological Assay , Humans , Lab-On-A-Chip Devices , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
6.
Int J Disaster Risk Reduct ; 70: 102762, 2022 Feb 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587652

ABSTRACT

Novel coronavirus pneumonia has had a significant impact on people's lives and psychological health. We developed a stage model to analyse the spatial and temporal distribution of public panic during the two waves of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. We used tweets with geographic location data from the popular hashtag 'Lockdown Diary' recorded from 23 January to April 8, 2020, and 'Nanjing Outbreak' recorded from 21 July to 1 September 2021 on Weibo. Combining the lexicon-based sentiment analysis and the grounded theory approach, this panic model could explain people's panic and behavioural responses in different areas at different stages of the pandemic. Next, we used the latent Dirichlet allocation topic model to reconfirm the panic model. The results showed that public sentiments fluctuated strongly in the early stages; in this case, panic and prayers were the dominant sentiments. In terms of spatial distribution, public panic showed hierarchical and neighbourhood diffusion, with highly assertive expressions of sentiment at the outbreak sites, economically developed areas, and areas surrounding the outbreak. Most importantly, we considered that public panic was affected by the 17 specific topics extracted based on the perceived and actual distance of the pandemic, thus stimulating the process of panic from minimal, acute, and mild panic to perceived rationality. Consequently, the public's behavioural responses shifted from delayed, negative, and positive, to rational behavioural responses. This study presents a novel approach to explore public panic from both a time and space perspective and provides some suggestions in response to future pandemics.

7.
Epilepsia ; 63(1): 244-251, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528372

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to investigate the COVID-19 vaccine uptake rate and possible postvaccination effects in adults with epilepsy. METHODS: We invited adults with epilepsy attending three centers in China from July 24 to August 31, 2021 to participate in this study. We also asked age- and sex-matched controls among people attending for other chronic neuropsychiatric conditions and healthy controls accompanying people with illness attending the hospitals to participate. We excluded people who, under the national guidelines, had evident contradictions to vaccination. Participants were interviewed face-to-face using questionnaires. Vaccine uptake and postvaccine adverse events among the people with epilepsy were compared with those with neuropsychiatric conditions and controls. We also compared the willingness and reasons for hesitancy among unvaccinated participants. RESULTS: We enrolled 981 people, of whom 491 had epilepsy, 217 had other neuropsychiatric conditions, and 273 were controls. Forty-two percent of those with epilepsy had had the first dose of a vaccine, compared with 93% of controls and 84% of the people with neuropsychiatric conditions (p < .0001). The majority (93.8%) of those immunized had inactivated vaccines. Among the unvaccinated people with epilepsy, 59.6% were willing to have the vaccine. Their main reasons for hesitation were potential adverse effects (53.3%) and concerns about losing seizure control (47.0%). The incidence of adverse events in the epilepsy group was similar to controls. Nineteen people with epilepsy reported an increase in seizure frequency. No episode of status epilepticus or prolonged seizures was reported. Two controls had their first-ever seizure, which was unlikely related to the vaccine. SIGNIFICANCE: The vaccine uptake rate in people with epilepsy was lower than in their same-age controls. The postvaccination effect was no higher than in controls. We found no evidence suggesting worsening seizures after vaccination. Measurement and education focused on increasing the vaccination rate in epilepsy are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Epilepsy , Seizures , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Case-Control Studies , China , Epilepsy/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/diagnosis , Vaccines
8.
Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine ; 30(3):283-286, 2020.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1408653

ABSTRACT

This article discusses the interplay of TCM and medical treatment for COVID-19. The generalisation of the treatment of pneumonia caused by the type of coronavirus. Temporarily Yuan is referred to as Ye Xingyi, Yuanyao, Ye Xingyi requires the establishment of a combination of Chinese and Western medicine.

9.
Open Journal of Preventive Medicine ; 11(4):159-167, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1263022

ABSTRACT

New coronavirus pneumonia spread rapidly all over the world in the first half of 2020, which is a new respiratory disease with strong infectiousness. At present, the epidemic situation in China has been effectively controlled, but the global epidemic situation remains grim, and the National Health Commission has instructed that the prevention and control of new coronavirus pneumonia should become normalized. As outposts for surveillance of public health events, hospitals are an important front in the fight against the epidemic. Therefore, it is very crucial to construct infection prevention and control system actively to contain the outbreak. This paper analyzes and summarizes the normal prevention and control management strategy of Infection Control Branch Management (hereinafter referred to as Hospital Infection-Control Dept) in a certain designated comprehensive third-grade hospital in Guangdong Province and transforms the prevention and control means in emergency state into measures for sustainable development, which also provides basis and reference for Hospital Infection-Control Dept of medical institutions to formulate prevention and control guidelines.

10.
Asia Pacific Journal of Tourism Research ; 26(7):732-747, 2021.
Article in English | Taylor & Francis | ID: covidwho-1223222
11.
Neurology ; 95(11): e1479-e1487, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197357

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate new-onset neurologic impairments associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: A retrospective multicenter cohort study was conducted between January 18 and March 20, 2020, including people with confirmed COVID-19 from 56 hospitals officially designated in 3 Chinese regions; data were extracted from medical records. New-onset neurologic events as assessed by neurology consultants based on manifestations, clinical examination, and investigations were noted, in which critical events included disorders of consciousness, stroke, CNS infection, seizures, and status epilepticus. RESULTS: We enrolled 917 people with average age 48.7 years and 55% were male. The frequency of new-onset critical neurologic events was 3.5% (32/917) overall and 9.4% (30/319) among those with severe or critical COVID-19. These were impaired consciousness (n = 25) or stroke (n = 10). The risk of critical neurologic events was highly associated with age above 60 years and previous history of neurologic conditions. Noncritical events were seen in fewer than 1% (7/917), including muscle cramp, unexplained headache, occipital neuralgia, tic, and tremor. Brain CT in 28 people led to new findings in 9. Findings from lumbar puncture in 3 with suspected CNS infection, unexplained headache, or severe occipital neuralgia were unremarkable. CONCLUSIONS: People with COVID-19 aged over 60 and with neurologic comorbidities were at higher risk of developing critical neurologic impairment, mainly impaired consciousness and cerebrovascular accidents. Brain CT should be considered when new-onset brain injury is suspected, especially in people under sedation or showing an unexplained decline in consciousness. Evidence of direct acute insult of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 to the CNS is lacking.


Subject(s)
Central Nervous System Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Central Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
12.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 653662, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190348

ABSTRACT

Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is a national strategy adopted for the treatment of heroin dependency in China. The sudden outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the resultant social isolation in Wuhan have also had a significant negative impact on local patients undertaking MMT. In this study, 76 patients on MMT from the Wuhan First Health Clinic were selected as the research objects to investigate the effect of COVID-19 on the levels of stress, anxiety, and depression, as well as the withdrawal symptoms and craving and substance use. Our results revealed that, during the outbreak, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) score, HAMA score, HAMD score, and craving in the included patients was significantly higher than that at the baseline and post-epidemic (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, p < 0.01, p < 0.01, respectively); the positive rate of morphine and methamphetamine urine test was significantly lower than that the post-epidemic (p = 0.01, p < 0.01, respectively); the amount of tobacco used during the outbreak and the post-epidemic period was significantly higher than that at the baseline (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, respectively), while the amount of alcohol consumed at the outbreak was significantly higher than at the baseline and the post-epidemic (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, respectively). The negative emotions aroused by the COVID-19 outbreak and the accompanying social isolation to patients on MMT are an important factor of negative reinforcement that adversely affected the patients' craving for drugs and the consumption of legal substances. This finding suggests the need to strengthen the psychological counseling for patients on MMT during severe epidemic, actively alleviating the negative emotions, reducing the risk of substance abuse, and strengthening drug management after the epidemic to prevent the rise of substance (legal or illegal) abuse.

13.
Front Hum Neurosci ; 15: 628105, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167351

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Public health guidelines have recommended that elective medical procedures, including deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for Parkinson's disease (PD), should not be scheduled during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic to prevent further virus spread and overload on health care systems. However, delaying DBS surgery for PD may not be in the best interest of individual patients and is not called for in regions where virus spread is under control and inpatient facilities are not overloaded. METHODS: We administered a newly developed phone questionnaire to 20 consecutive patients with PD who received DBS surgery in Ruijin Hospital in Shanghai during the COVID-19 pandemic. The questionnaire was designed to gather the patients' experiences and perceptions on the impact of COVID-19 on their everyday activities and access to medical care. RESULTS: Most of the patients felt confident about the preventive measures taken by the government and hospitals, and they have changed their daily living activities accordingly. Moreover, a large majority of patients felt confident obtaining access to regular and COVID-19-related health care services if needed. Routine clinical referral, sense of security in the hospital during the outbreak, and poor control of PD symptoms were the three main reasons given by patients for seeking DBS surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has considerably impacted medical care and patients' lives but elective procedures, such as DBS surgery for PD, do not need to be rescheduled when the health care system is not overloaded and adequate public health regulations are in place.

15.
Front Pharmacol ; 11: 583450, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133942

ABSTRACT

Objective: To present the evidence of the therapeutic effects and safety of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) used with or without conventional western therapy for COVID-19. Methods: Clinical studies on the therapeutic effects and safety of CHM for COVID-19 were included. We summarized the general characteristics of included studies, evaluated methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using the Cochrane risk of bias tool, analyzed the use of CHM, used Revman 5.4 software to present the risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) and their 95% confidence interval (CI) to estimate the therapeutic effects and safety of CHM. Results: A total of 58 clinical studies were identified including RCTs (17.24%, 10), non-randomized controlled trials (1.72%, 1), retrospective studies with a control group (18.97%, 11), case-series (20.69%, 12) and case-reports (41.38%, 24). No RCTs of high methodological quality were identified. The most frequently tested oral Chinese patent medicine, Chinese herbal medicine injection or prescribed herbal decoction were: Lianhua Qingwen granule/capsule, Xuebijing injection and Maxing Shigan Tang. In terms of aggravation rate, pooled analyses showed that there were statistical differences between the intervention group and the comparator group (RR 0.42, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.82, six RCTs; RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.64, five retrospective studies with a control group), that is, CHM plus conventional western therapy appeared better than conventional western therapy alone in reducing aggravation rate. In addition, compared with conventional western therapy, CHM plus conventional western therapy had potential advantages in increasing the recovery rate and shortening the duration of fever, cough and fatigue, improving the negative conversion rate of nucleic acid test, and increasing the improvement rate of chest CT manifestations and shortening the time from receiving the treatment to the beginning of chest CT manifestations improvement. For adverse events, pooled data showed that there were no statistical differences between the CHM and the control groups. Conclusion: Current low certainty evidence suggests that there maybe a tendency that CHM plus conventional western therapy is superior to conventional western therapy alone. The use of CHM did not increase the risk of adverse events.

16.
J Nurs Manag ; 29(5): 1180-1188, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1042318

ABSTRACT

AIM: To understand about the experiences and feelings of the nurses infected with COVID-19 when caring for patients with COVID-19. BACKGROUND: With the sudden outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), nurses take care of patients with COVID-19 and have a very high risk of being infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) themselves. METHODS: This study adopted a qualitative design of hermeneutic phenomenology. A purposeful sampling was used, and all data were collected through in-depth semi-structured telephone interviews then analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. RESULTS: The interview data generated 4 topics and 14 secondary topics. Four major themes were identified from this study, including 'experiences of infection', 'health belief', 'social support' and 'the pursuit of self-worth'. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses infected by COVID-19 experienced a physical and psychological shock. They had a strong sense of responsibility and willingness to take risks. Providing professional psychological counselling and physical rehabilitation services are crucial. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: This manuscript provides nursing managers an understanding of the personal experiences and needs of clinical nurses in their work, especially during COVID-19. It is helpful for nursing managers to explore the greater driving force of nurses and prepare nursing human resources for greater challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , China , Humans , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Neurosurg Focus ; 49(6): E11, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-953947

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has considerably affected the delivery of postoperative care to patients who have undergone deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. DBS teleprogramming technology was developed and deployed in China before the COVID-19 outbreak. In this report, the authors share their experiences with telemedical DBS treatment of patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: Four patients (2 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, 1 with major depressive disorder, and 1 with anorexia nervosa) underwent DBS surgery at Ruijin Hospital and received continuous postoperative DBS telemedicine case management from January 2020 to July 2020. DBS teleprogramming, individualized psychological support, and medical consultations were provided via the authors' DBS telemedicine platform, which also incorporated a synchronous real-time video communication system. RESULTS: Forty-five DBS telemedicine sessions were conducted; there was no unexpected loss of network connection during the sessions. Of these, 28 sessions involved DBS teleprogramming. Adjustments were made to the stimulation voltage, frequency, pulse width, and contact site in 21, 12, 9, and 9 sessions, respectively. Psychological support and troubleshooting were provided during the remaining telemedicine sessions. Modest to substantial clinical improvements after DBS surgery were observed in some but not all patients, whereas stimulation-related side effects were reported by 2 patients and included reversible sleep and mood problems, headache, and a sensation of heat. CONCLUSIONS: DBS telemedicine seems to offer a feasible, safe, and efficient strategy for maintaining the delivery of medical care to psychiatric patients during the COVID-19 outbreak. The authors propose that implementation of a comprehensive DBS telemedicine system, which combines DBS teleprogramming with psychological counseling, medical consultations, and medication prescriptions and delivery, could be an efficient and effective approach to manage the mental health and quality of life of patients with psychiatric disorders during future local or global public health crises.


Subject(s)
Anorexia Nervosa/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Deep Brain Stimulation/methods , Depressive Disorder, Major/surgery , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/surgery , Telemedicine/methods , Anorexia Nervosa/diagnosis , Anorexia Nervosa/psychology , Deep Brain Stimulation/standards , Depressive Disorder, Major/diagnosis , Depressive Disorder, Major/psychology , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Mental Disorders , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/diagnosis , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/standards , Treatment Outcome
18.
Front Immunol ; 11: 2063, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-868947

ABSTRACT

Background: Cases of excessive neutrophil counts in the blood in severe coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients have drawn significant attention. Neutrophil infiltration was also noted on the pathological findings from autopsies. It is urgent to clarify the pathogenesis of neutrophils leading to severe pneumonia in COVID-19. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 55 COVID-19 patients classified as mild (n = 22), moderate (n = 25), and severe (n = 8) according to the Guidelines released by the National Health Commission of China. Trends relating leukocyte counts and lungs examined by chest CT scan were quantified by Bayesian inference. Transcriptional signatures of host immune cells of four COVID19 patients were analyzed by RNA sequencing of lung specimens and BALF. Results: Neutrophilia occurred in 6 of 8 severe patients at 7-19 days after symptom onset, coinciding with lesion progression. Increasing neutrophil counts paralleled lesion CT values (slope: 0.8 and 0.3-1.2), reflecting neutrophilia-induced lung injury in severe patients. Transcriptome analysis revealed that neutrophil activation was correlated with 17 neutrophil extracellular trap (NET)-associated genes in COVID-19 patients, which was related to innate immunity and interacted with T/NK/B cells, as supported by a protein-protein interaction network analysis. Conclusion: Excessive neutrophils and associated NETs could explain the pathogenesis of lung injury in COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Extracellular Traps/genetics , Neutrophil Activation/genetics , Neutrophils/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Adult , Aged , Bayes Theorem , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Lung Injury/immunology , Lung Injury/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophil Infiltration/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Interaction Maps/immunology , RNA, Viral/genetics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcriptome
19.
Academic Journal of Second Military Medical University ; 41(4):409-413, 2020.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-823639

ABSTRACT

Due to the high infection and occult onset of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the procedure and management of nuclear medicine imaging examination during COVID-19 epidemic period should be arranged according to the infection risk of the patients to improve the prevention and control management. According to the clinical manifestations and epidemiological history of the patients, the infection risk was stratified, and the corresponding prevention and control suggestions were put forward according to the characteristics of nuclear medical imaging. It is crucial to distinguish patients in the incubation period and the susceptible virus carriers before the examination. The patients should be divided into regular group, potential risk group, high risk group and suspected group, and then examinations should be given to patients with infection risk from low to high, during which the medical workers should adopt corresponding personal protection, with the environment and equipment properly disinfected afterward. The corresponding arrangement and prevention and control management based on the infection risk of patients can help to avoid cross infection of patients, ensure the safety of medical workers and meet the clinical needs.

20.
Epilepsia ; 61(6): e49-e53, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-637375

ABSTRACT

Our aim was to clarify the incidence and risk of acute symptomatic seizures in people with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This multicenter retrospective study enrolled people with COVID-19 from January 18 to February 18, 2020 at 42 government-designated hospitals in Hubei province, the epicenter of the epidemic in China; Sichuan province; and Chongqing municipality. Data were collected from medical records by 11 neurologists using a standard case report form. A total of 304 people were enrolled, of whom 108 had a severe condition. None in this cohort had a known history of epilepsy. Neither acute symptomatic seizures nor status epilepticus was observed. Two people had seizurelike symptoms during hospitalization due to acute stress reaction and hypocalcemia, and 84 (27%) had brain insults or metabolic imbalances during the disease course known to increase the risk of seizures. There was no evidence suggesting an additional risk of acute symptomatic seizures in people with COVID-19. Neither the virus nor potential risk factors for seizures seem to be significant risks for the occurrence of acute symptomatic seizures in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hypoxia/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Seizures/epidemiology , Water-Electrolyte Imbalance/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
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