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1.
Ther Adv Chronic Dis ; 12: 20406223211041924, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398819

ABSTRACT

Background: A novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused outbreaks worldwide, and the number of cases is rapidly increasing through human-to-human transmission. Because of the greater transmission capacity and possible subsequent multi-organ damage caused by the virus, it is crucial to understand precisely and manage COVID-19 patients. However, the underlying differences in the clinical features of COVID-19 with and without comorbidities are not fully understood. Aim: The objective of this study was to identify the clinical features of COVID-19 patients with and without complications to guide treatment and predict the prognosis. Method: We collected the clinical characteristics of COVID-19 patients with and without different complications, including hypertension, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Next, we performed a baseline comparison of each index and traced the dynamic changes in these factors during hospitalization to explore the potential associations. Result: A clinical index of differential expression was used for the regression to select top-ranking factors. The top-ranking clinical characteristics varied in each subgroup, such as indices of liver function, renal function and inflammatory markers. Among them, the indices of renal function were highly ranked in all subgroups and displayed significant differences during hospitalization. Conclusion: Organ functions of COVID-19 patients, particularly renal function, should be cautiously taken care of during management and might be a crucial factor for a poor prognosis of these patients with complications.

2.
Front Med ; 15(5): 704-717, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1204959

ABSTRACT

We conducted a randomized, open-label, parallel-controlled, multicenter trial on the use of Shuanghuanglian (SHL), a traditional Chinese patent medicine, in treating cases of COVID-19. A total of 176 patients received SHL by three doses (56 in low dose, 61 in middle dose, and 59 in high dose) in addition to standard care. The control group was composed of 59 patients who received standard therapy alone. Treatment with SHL was not associated with a difference from standard care in the time to disease recovery. Patients with 14-day SHL treatment had significantly higher rate in negative conversion of SARS-CoV-2 in nucleic acid swab tests than the patients from the control group (93.4% vs. 73.9%, P = 0.006). Analysis of chest computed tomography images showed that treatment with high-dose SHL significantly promoted absorption of inflammatory focus of pneumonia, which was evaluated by density reduction of inflammatory focus from baseline, at day 7 (mean difference (95% CI), -46.39 (-86.83 to -5.94) HU; P = 0.025) and day 14 (mean difference (95% CI), -74.21 (-133.35 to -15.08) HU; P = 0.014). No serious adverse events occurred in the SHL groups. This study illustrated that SHL in combination with standard care was safe and partially effective for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
3.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 582764, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154222

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has swept through the world at a tremendous speed, and there is still limited data available on the treatment for COVID-19. The mortality of severely and critically ill COVID-19 patients in the Optical Valley Branch of Tongji Hospital was low. We aimed to analyze the available treatment strategies to reduce mortality. Methods: In this retrospective, single-center study, we included 1,106 COVID-19 patients admitted to the Optical Valley Branch of Tongji Hospital from February 9 to March 9, 2020. Cases were analyzed for demographic and clinical features, laboratory data, and treatment methods. Outcomes were followed up until March 29, 2020. Results: Inflammation-related indices (hs-CRP, ESR, serum ferritin, and procalcitonin) were significantly higher in severe and critically ill patients than those in moderate patients. The levels of cytokines, including IL-6, IL2R, IL-8, and TNF-α, were also higher in the critical patients. Incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in the severely and critically ill group was 23.0% (99/431). Sixty-one patients underwent invasive mechanical ventilation. The correlation between SpO2/FiO2 and PaO2/FiO2 was confirmed, and the cut-off value of SpO2/FiO2 related to survival was 134.43. The mortality of patients with low SpO2/FiO2 (<134.43) at intubation was higher than that of patients with high SpO2/FiO2 (>134.43) (72.7 vs. 33.3%). Among critical patients, the application rates of glucocorticoid therapy, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), and anticoagulation treatment reached 55.2% (238/431), 7.2% (31/431), and 37.1% (160/431), respectively. Among the intubated patients, the application rates of glucocorticoid therapy, CRRT, and anticoagulation treatment were respectively 77.0% (47/61), 54.1% (33/61), and 98.4% (60/61). Conclusion: No vaccines or specific antiviral drugs for COVID-19 have been shown to be sufficiently safe and effective to date. Comprehensive treatment including ventilatory support, multiple organ function preservation, glucocorticoid use, renal replacement therapy, anticoagulation, and restrictive fluid management was the main treatment strategy. Early recognition and intervention, multidisciplinary collaboration, multi-organ function support, and personalized treatment might be the key for reducing mortality.

4.
Mediators Inflamm ; 2021: 8812304, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145381

ABSTRACT

Objective: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a considerable global public health threat. This study sought to investigate whether blood glucose (BG) levels or comorbid diabetes are associated with inflammatory status and disease severity in patients with COVID-19. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, the clinical and biochemical characteristics of COVID-19 patients with or without diabetes were compared. The relationship among severity of COVID-19, inflammatory status, and diabetes or hyperglycemia was analyzed. The severity of COVID-19 in all patients was determined according to the diagnostic and treatment guidelines issued by the Chinese National Health Committee (7th edition). Results: Four hundred and sixty-one patients were enrolled in our study, and 71.58% of patients with diabetes and 13.03% of patients without diabetes had hyperglycemia. Compared with patients without diabetes (n = 366), patients with diabetes (n = 95) had a higher leucocyte count, neutrophil count, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). There was no association between severity of COVID-19 and known diabetes adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), known hypertension, and coronary heart disease. The leucocyte count, NLR, and C-reactive protein (CRP) level increased with increasing BG level. Hyperglycemia was an independent predictor of critical (OR 4.00, 95% CI 1.72-9.30) or severe (OR 3.55, 95% CI 1.47-8.58) COVID-19, and of increased inflammatory levels (high leucocyte count (OR 4.26, 95% CI 1.65-10.97), NLR (OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.24-6.10), and CRP level (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.19-5.23)), after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, severity of illness, and known diabetes. Conclusion: Hyperglycemia was positively correlated with higher inflammation levels and more severe illness, and it is a risk factor for the increased severity of COVID-19. The initial measurement of plasma glucose levels after hospitalization may help identify a subset of patients who are predisposed to a worse clinical course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Hyperglycemia/blood , Hyperglycemia/complications , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Blood Glucose/metabolism , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/blood , Female , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Int J Biol Sci ; 17(2): 539-548, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1090199

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused a global pandemic. A classifier combining chest X-ray (CXR) with clinical features may serve as a rapid screening approach. Methods: The study included 512 patients with COVID-19 and 106 with influenza A/B pneumonia. A deep neural network (DNN) was applied, and deep features derived from CXR and clinical findings formed fused features for diagnosis prediction. Results: The clinical features of COVID-19 and influenza showed different patterns. Patients with COVID-19 experienced less fever, more diarrhea, and more salient hypercoagulability. Classifiers constructed using the clinical features or CXR had an area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) of 0.909 and 0.919, respectively. The diagnostic efficacy of the classifier combining the clinical features and CXR was dramatically improved and the AUC was 0.952 with 91.5% sensitivity and 81.2% specificity. Moreover, combined classifier was functional in both severe and non-serve COVID-19, with an AUC of 0.971 with 96.9% sensitivity in non-severe cases, which was on par with the computed tomography (CT)-based classifier, but had relatively inferior efficacy in severe cases compared to CT. In extension, we performed a reader study involving three experienced pulmonary physicians, artificial intelligence (AI) system demonstrated superiority in turn-around time and diagnostic accuracy compared with experienced pulmonary physicians. Conclusions: The classifier constructed using clinical and CXR features is efficient, economical, and radiation safe for distinguishing COVID-19 from influenza A/B pneumonia, serving as an ideal rapid screening tool during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Influenza, Human/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Radiography, Thoracic , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Deep Learning , Diagnosis, Differential , Humans , Influenza A virus/isolation & purification , Influenza B virus/isolation & purification , Influenza, Human/physiopathology , Influenza, Human/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sensitivity and Specificity
6.
Sci Adv ; 7(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066782

ABSTRACT

The recovery process of COVID-19 patients is unclear. Some recovered patients complain of continued shortness of breath. Vasculopathy has been reported in COVID-19, stressing the importance of probing pulmonary microstructure and function at the alveolar-capillary interface. While computed tomography (CT) detects structural abnormalities, little is known about the impact of disease on lung function. 129Xe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a technique uniquely capable of assessing ventilation, microstructure, and gas exchange. Using 129Xe MRI, we found that COVID-19 patients show a higher rate of ventilation defects (5.9% versus 3.7%), unchanged microstructure, and longer gas-blood exchange time (43.5 ms versus 32.5 ms) compared with healthy individuals. These findings suggest that regional ventilation and alveolar airspace dimensions are relatively normal around the time of discharge, while gas-blood exchange function is diminished. This study establishes the feasibility of localized lung function measurements in COVID-19 patients and their potential usefulness as a supplement to structural imaging.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/physiopathology , Lung/physiopathology , Pulmonary Gas Exchange , Adult , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Respiratory Function Tests , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Xenon Isotopes
7.
Sci Adv ; 7(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066781

ABSTRACT

Despite past extensive studies, the mechanisms underlying pulmonary fibrosis (PF) still remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that lungs originating from different types of patients with PF, including coronavirus disease 2019, systemic sclerosis-associated interstitial lung disease, and idiopathic PF, and from mice following bleomycin (BLM)-induced PF are characterized by the altered methyl-CpG-binding domain 2 (MBD2) expression in macrophages. Depletion of Mbd2 in macrophages protected mice against BLM-induced PF. Mbd2 deficiency significantly attenuated transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGF-ß1) production and reduced M2 macrophage accumulation in the lung following BLM induction. Mechanistically, Mbd2 selectively bound to the Ship promoter in macrophages, by which it repressed Ship expression and enhanced PI3K/Akt signaling to promote the macrophage M2 program. Therefore, intratracheal administration of liposomes loaded with Mbd2 siRNA protected mice from BLM-induced lung injuries and fibrosis. Together, our data support the possibility that MBD2 could be a viable target against PF in clinical settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Macrophages/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , Animals , Bleomycin/pharmacology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/metabolism , Fibrosis , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Liposomes/chemistry , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/metabolism , Lung Neoplasms/metabolism , Macrophages/virology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Pulmonary Fibrosis/virology , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , Scleroderma, Systemic/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism
10.
Preprint | SciFinder | ID: ppcovidwho-5379

ABSTRACT

A review. To standard the clin. diagnosis and treatment of severe and critical novel coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19), improve the treatment and reduce the fatality rate, we develop the diagnosis and treatment plan for severe and critical novel coronavirus pneumonia, including diagnostic criteria, early warning indicators, treatment process and nursing plan, based on the National Health Committee of China published novel coronavirus pneumonia diagnosis and treatment plan (trial version 6) and severe and critical novel coronavirus pneumonia diagnosis and treatment plan (trial version 1), combined with the practice of early medical treatment experience, to provide the reference for counterparts.

11.
Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob ; 20(1): 3, 2021 Jan 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013151

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Little is yet known whether pathogenesis of COVID-19 is different between young and elder patients. Our study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics and provide predictors of mortality for young adults with severe COVID-19. METHODS: A total of 77 young adults with confirmed severe COVID-19 were recruited retrospectively at Tongji Hospital. Clinical characteristics, laboratory findings, treatment and outcomes were obtained from electronic medical records. The prognostic effects of variables were analyzed using logistic regression model. RESULTS: In this retrospective cohort, non-survivors showed higher incidence of dyspnea and co-existing laboratory abnormalities, compared with young survivals in severe COVID-19. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that lymphopenia, elevated level of d-dimer, hypersensitive cardiac troponin I (hs-CTnI) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were independent predictors of mortality in young adults with severe COVID-19. Further analysis showed that severely young adults with two or more factors abnormalities above would be more prone to death. The similar predictive effect of above four factors had been observed in all-age patients with severe COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Lymphopenia, elevated level of d-dimer, hs-CTnI and hs-CRP predicted clinical outcomes of young adults with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Regression Analysis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
12.
J Mol Diagn ; 23(1): 10-18, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-988428

ABSTRACT

The prevalence and clinical relevance of viremia in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have not been well studied. A prospective cohort study was designed to investigate blood viral load and clearance kinetics in 52 patients (median age, 62 years; 31 [59.6%] male) and explore their association with clinical features and outcomes based on a novel one-step RT droplet digital PCR (RT-ddPCR). By using one-step RT-ddPCR, 92.3% (48 of 52) of this cohort was quantitatively detected with viremia. The concordance between the blood and oropharyngeal swab tests was 60.92% (53 of 87). One-step RT-ddPCR was tested with a 3.03% false-positive rate and lower 50% confidence interval of detection at 54.026 copies/mL plasma. There was no reduction in the blood viral load in all critical patients, whereas the general and severe patients exhibited a similar ability to clear the viral load. The viral loads in critical patients were significantly higher than those in their general and severe counterparts. Among the 52 study patients, 30 (58%) were discharged from the hospital. Among half of the 30 discharged patients, blood viral load remained positive, of which 76.9% (10 of 13) completely cleared their blood viral load at follow-up. Meanwhile, none of their close contacts had evidence of infection. Quantitative determination of the blood viral test is of great clinical significance in the management of patients with coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Severity of Illness Index , Viral Load/methods , Viremia/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oropharynx/virology , Prospective Studies , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Treatment Outcome , Viremia/mortality
13.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 11: 571037, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-868936

ABSTRACT

Background: Diabetes has been found to increase severity and mortality under the current pandemic of coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19). Up to date, the clinical characteristics of diabetes patients with COVID-19 and the risk factors for poor clinical outcomes are not clearly understood. Methods: The study was retrospectively carried out on enrolled diabetes patients with laboratory confirmed COVID-19 infection from a designated medical center for COVID-19 from January 25th, 2020 to February 14th, 2020 in Wuhan, China. The medical record was collected and reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the risk factors associated with the severe events which were defined as a composite endpoint of admission to intensive care unit, the use of mechanical ventilation, or death. Results: A total of 52 diabetes patients with COVID-19 were finally included in the study. 21 (40.4%) patients had developed severe events in 27.50 (IQR 12.25-35.75) days follow-up, 15 (28.8%) patients experienced life-threatening complications and 8 patients died with a recorded mortality rate of 15.4%. Only 13 patients (41.9%) were in optimal glycemic control with HbA1c value of <7.0%. In addition to general clinical characteristics of COVID-19, the severe events diabetes patients showed higher counts of white blood cells and neutrophil, lower lymphocytes (40, 76.9%), high levels of hs-CRP, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and procalcitonin (PCT) as compared to the non-severe diabetes patients. Mild higher level of cardiac troponin I (cTNI) (32.0 pg/ml; IQR 16.80-55.00) and D-dimer (1.70 µg/L, IQR 0.70-2.40) were found in diabetes patients with severe events as compared to the non-severe patients (cTNI:20.00 pg/ml, IQR5.38-30.00, p = 0.019; D-dimer: 0.70 µg/L, IQR 0.30-2.40, p = 0.037). After adjusting age and sex, increased level of cTNI was found to significantly associate with the incidence of severe events (HR: 1.007; 95% CI: 1.000-1.013; p = 0.048), Furthermore, using of α-glucosidase inhibitors was found to be the potential protectant for severe events (HR: 0.227; 95% CI: 0.057-0.904; p = 0.035). Conclusion: Diabetes patients with COVID-19 showed poor clinical outcomes. Vigorous monitoring of cTNI should be recommended for the diabetes patients with COVID-19. Usage of α-glucosidase inhibitors could be a potential protectant for the diabetes patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , Blood Glucose/analysis , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate
14.
Lancet ; 395(10236): 1569-1578, 2020 05 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-824547

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: No specific antiviral drug has been proven effective for treatment of patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Remdesivir (GS-5734), a nucleoside analogue prodrug, has inhibitory effects on pathogenic animal and human coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in vitro, and inhibits Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, SARS-CoV-1, and SARS-CoV-2 replication in animal models. METHODS: We did a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial at ten hospitals in Hubei, China. Eligible patients were adults (aged ≥18 years) admitted to hospital with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, with an interval from symptom onset to enrolment of 12 days or less, oxygen saturation of 94% or less on room air or a ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fractional inspired oxygen of 300 mm Hg or less, and radiologically confirmed pneumonia. Patients were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to intravenous remdesivir (200 mg on day 1 followed by 100 mg on days 2-10 in single daily infusions) or the same volume of placebo infusions for 10 days. Patients were permitted concomitant use of lopinavir-ritonavir, interferons, and corticosteroids. The primary endpoint was time to clinical improvement up to day 28, defined as the time (in days) from randomisation to the point of a decline of two levels on a six-point ordinal scale of clinical status (from 1=discharged to 6=death) or discharged alive from hospital, whichever came first. Primary analysis was done in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population and safety analysis was done in all patients who started their assigned treatment. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04257656. FINDINGS: Between Feb 6, 2020, and March 12, 2020, 237 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to a treatment group (158 to remdesivir and 79 to placebo); one patient in the placebo group who withdrew after randomisation was not included in the ITT population. Remdesivir use was not associated with a difference in time to clinical improvement (hazard ratio 1·23 [95% CI 0·87-1·75]). Although not statistically significant, patients receiving remdesivir had a numerically faster time to clinical improvement than those receiving placebo among patients with symptom duration of 10 days or less (hazard ratio 1·52 [0·95-2·43]). Adverse events were reported in 102 (66%) of 155 remdesivir recipients versus 50 (64%) of 78 placebo recipients. Remdesivir was stopped early because of adverse events in 18 (12%) patients versus four (5%) patients who stopped placebo early. INTERPRETATION: In this study of adult patients admitted to hospital for severe COVID-19, remdesivir was not associated with statistically significant clinical benefits. However, the numerical reduction in time to clinical improvement in those treated earlier requires confirmation in larger studies. FUNDING: Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Emergency Project of COVID-19, National Key Research and Development Program of China, the Beijing Science and Technology Project.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Aged , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Infusions, Intravenous , Male , Middle Aged , Negative Results , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Med Virol ; 92(7): 807-813, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-823738

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, an outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2) infection occurred in Wuhan, and rapidly spread to worldwide, which has attracted many people's concerns about the patients. However, studies on the infection status of medical personnel is still lacking. A total of 54 cases of SARS-Cov-2 infected medical staff from Tongji Hospital between 7 January and 11 February 2020 were analyzed in this retrospective study. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics were compared between different groups by statistical method. From 7 January to 11 February 2020, 54 medical staff of Tongji Hospital were hospitalized due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Most of them were from other clinical departments (72.2%) rather than emergency department (3.7%) or medical technology departments (18.5%). Among the 54 patients with COVID-19, the distribution of age had a significant difference between non-severe type and severe/critical cases (median age: 47 years vs 38 years; P = .0015). However, there was no statistical difference in terms of gender distribution and the first symptoms between theses two groups. Furthermore, we observed that the lesion regions in SARS-Cov-2 infected lungs with severe-/critical-type of medical staff were more likely to exhibit lesions in the right upper lobe (31.7% vs 0%; P = .028) and right lung (61% vs 18.2%; P = .012). Based on our findings with medical staff infection data, we suggest training for all hospital staff to prevent infection and preparation of sufficient protection and disinfection materials.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/classification , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , China , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Female , Hospital Departments/classification , Humans , Immunoglobulins/therapeutic use , Interferons/therapeutic use , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
19.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e927212, 2020 Sep 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745340

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The rapid worldwide spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic has placed patients with pre-existing conditions at risk of severe morbidity and mortality. The present study investigated the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with severe COVID-19 and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). MATERIAL AND METHODS This study enrolled 336 consecutive patients with confirmed severe COVID-19, including 28 diagnosed with COPD, from January 20, 2020, to April 1, 2020. Demographic data, symptoms, laboratory values, comorbidities, and clinical results were measured and compared in survivors and non-survivors. RESULTS Patients with severe COVID-19 and COPD were older than those without COPD. The proportions of men, of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and of those requiring invasive ventilation were significantly higher in patients with than without COPD. Leukocyte and neutrophil counts, as well as the concentrations of NT-proBNP, hemoglobin, D-dimer, hsCRP, ferritin, IL-2R, TNF-alpha and procalcitonin were higher, whereas lymphocyte and monocyte counts were lower, in patients with than without COPD. Of the 28 patients with COPD, 22 (78.6%) died, a rate significantly higher than in patients without COPD (36.0%). A comparison of surviving and non-surviving patients with severe COVID-19 and COPD showed that those who died had a longer history of COPD, more fatigue, and a higher ICU occupancy rate, but a shorter average hospital stay, than those who survived. CONCLUSIONS COPD increases the risks of death and negative outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Age Distribution , Aged , Biomarkers , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/blood , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/therapy , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Distribution , Survivors , Treatment Outcome
20.
Crit Care Med ; 48(11): e1079-e1086, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-725837

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: An ongoing outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 is spreading globally. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure is the most common complication of coronavirus disease 2019. However, the clinical effectiveness of early high-flow nasal oxygen treatment in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure has not been explored. This study aimed to analyze the effectiveness of high-flow nasal oxygen treatment and to identify the variables predicting high-flow nasal oxygen treatment failure in coronavirus disease 2019 patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. DESIGN: A multicenter, retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Three tertiary hospitals in Wuhan, China. PATIENTS: Forty-three confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 adult patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure treated with high-flow nasal oxygen. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Mean age of the enrolled patients was 63.0 ± 9.7 years; female patients accounted for 41.9%. High-flow nasal oxygen failure (defined as upgrading respiratory support to positive pressure ventilation or death) was observed in 20 patients (46.5%), of which 13 (30.2%) required endotracheal intubation. Patients with high-flow nasal oxygen success had a higher median oxygen saturation (96.0% vs 93.0%; p < 0.001) at admission than those with high-flow nasal oxygen failure. High-flow nasal oxygen failure was more likely in patients who were older (p = 0.030) and male (p = 0.037), had a significant increase in respiratory rate and a significant decrease in the ratio of oxygen saturation/FIO2 to respiratory rate index within 3 days of high-flow nasal oxygen treatment. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis model, male and lower oxygen saturation at admission remained independent predictors of high-flow nasal oxygen failure. The hospital mortality rate of the cohort was 32.5%; however, the hospital mortality rate in patients with high-flow nasal oxygen failure was 65%. CONCLUSIONS: High-flow nasal oxygen may be effective for treating coronavirus disease 2019 patients with mild to moderate acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. However, high-flow nasal oxygen failure was associated with a poor prognosis. Male and lower oxygenation at admission were the two strong predictors of high-flow nasal oxygen failure.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hypoxia/therapy , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Positive-Pressure Respiration , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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