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1.
The Lancet ; 398(10314):1871-1872, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1521619
2.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 686177, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450841

ABSTRACT

Background: Since the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic emerged, Internet usage has increased among adolescents. Due to this trend, the prevalence of Internet addiction disorder (IAD) may have increased within this group. This study examined the prevalence of IAD and its correlates among clinically stable adolescents with psychiatric disorders in China during the COVID-19 outbreak. Method: A multi-center, cross-sectional study was carried out between April 29 and June 9, 2020 in three major tertiary mental health centers in China. IAD and depressive symptoms were assessed using the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), respectively. Results: A total of 1,454 adolescent psychiatric patients were included in final analyses. The prevalence of IAD was 31.2% (95% CI: 28.8-33.6%) during the COVID-19 pandemic. A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that poor relationships with parents (P < 0.001, OR = 2.34, 95%CI: 1.49-3.68) and elevated total PHQ-9 scores (P < 0.001, OR = 1.19, 95%CI: 1.16-1.21) were significantly associated with higher risk for IAD while longer daily physical exercise durations (P = 0.04, OR = 0.67, 95%CI: 0.46-0.98) and rural residence (P = 0.003, OR = 0.62, 95%CI: 0.46-0.85) were significant correlates of lower risk for IAD. Conclusions: IAD was common among adolescent patients with clinically stable psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic; regular physical exercise, healthy relationships with parents and fewer symptoms of depression were associated with lower risk within this population.

3.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 505, 2021 10 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447295

ABSTRACT

Close contacts of those with COVID-19 (CC) may experience distress and long-lasting mental health effects. However, the mental health status and quality of life (QOL) in CC have not been adequately examined. This study examined the mental health status and QOL in CC during the post-COVID-19 period. This cross-sectional study comprised 1169 CC and 1290 who were non-close contacts (non-CC). Demographic data were collected; depression, fatigue, post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and QOL were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire - 9 items (PHQ-9), fatigue numeric rating scale, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist - 17 items (PCL-17), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire - brief version (WHOQOL-BREF), respectively. Analysis of covariance was used to compare depressive symptoms, QOL, fatigue, and PTSS between the CC and non-CC groups. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the independent correlates for depression, fatigue, PTSS, and QOL in the CC group. Compared to the non-CC group, the CC group reported significantly more severe depression (F(1, 2458) = 5.58, p = 0.018) and fatigue (F(1, 2458) = 9.22, p = 0.002) in the post-COVID-19 period. No significant differences in PTSS and QOL between the CC and non-CC groups were found (F(1, 2458) = 2.93, p = 0.087 for PTSS; F(1, 2458) = 3.45, p = 0.064 for QOL). In the CC group, younger age, financial loss due to COVID-19, and perception of poor or fair health status were significantly associated with depression and fatigue, while frequent use of mass media was significantly associated with fatigue. In conclusion, close contacts of COVID-19 patients experienced high levels of depression and fatigue in the post-COVID-19 period. Due to the negative effects of depression and fatigue on daily functioning, early detection and timely interventions should be provided to this neglected population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Health Status , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Am J Addict ; 30(6): 585-592, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of problematic Internet use (PIU) in the post-COVID-19 pandemic era is not known. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of PIU among baccalaureate nursing students (hereafter: nursing students) in the post-COVID-19 era. METHODS: A total of 1070 nursing students were consecutively invited to participate in this study from the nursing schools of five universities. PIU and quality of life (QOL) were assessed using the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF), respectively. t Tests, χ2 , tests, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare basic demographic and clinical characteristics between participants with and without PIU. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to examine independent correlates. RESULTS: The prevalence of PIU was 23.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.7%-25.8%). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that second- (p = .024) and third-year (p = .012) students were more likely to suffer from PIU compared with first year students. Students with more severe depressive (p = .014) and anxiety symptoms (p = .011) were independently and significantly associated with more severe PIU. After controlling for covariates, nursing students with PIU had a lower overall QOL score (p = .002). CONCLUSION AND SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE: Problematic Internet use (PIU) was common among nursing students in the post-COVID-19 era. Considering the negative impact of PIU on QOL and academic performance, regular screening should be conducted and effective interventions implemented for nursing students with PIU. This was the first study on the prevalence of PIU among nursing students in the post-COVID-19 era. The findings of this study could help health professionals and education authorities to understand the patterns of PIU and its influence on QOL among nursing students and to allocate health resources and develop effective measures to reduce the risk of PIU in this population.

5.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 678917, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325577

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused psychological distress and heavy burden in medical professionals. This study examined the prevalence of fatigue and its association with quality of life (QOL) in clinicians working in ophthalmology and otolaryngology departments during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. Methods: This was a cross-sectional national online survey conducted between March 15 and March 20, 2020 in China. The severity of fatigue, depression and QOL were measured using the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF), respectively. Results: In total, 3,912 clinicians completed the survey (2,155 in ophthalmology department, and 1,757 in otolaryngology department); 2,049 [52.4%; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 50.8-53.9%] reported fatigue (NRS score ≥ 4). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that junior clinicians [Odds ratio (OR) = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.68-1.00, P = 0.045] had lower risk of fatigue; while clinicians working in tertiary hospitals (OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.02-1.49, P = 0.029), and the presence of more severe depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 total score ≥ 5; OR = 7.40, 95% CI = 6.29-8.70, P < 0.001) were independently associated with higher risk of fatigue. After controlling for covariates, clinicians with fatigue had significantly lower QOL compared with those without [F (1, 3, 911) = 283.75, P < 0.001]. Conclusion: Fatigue was common in clinicians working in ophthalmology and otolaryngology departments during the COVID-19 pandemic. Considering the negative impact of fatigue on clinicians' QOL, health authorities and policymakers should conduct regular screening for fatigue and develop preventive strategies for frontline clinicians working under excessive stress.

6.
J Affect Disord ; 294: 753-760, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322168

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted the mental health and well-being of medical personnel, including nursing students. Network analysis provides a deeper characterization of symptom-symptom interactions in mental disorders. The aim of this study was to elucidate characteristics of anxiety and depressive symptom networks of Chinese nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: A total of 932 nursing students were included. Anxiety and depressive symptom were measured using the seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) and two-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2), respectively. Central symptoms and bridge symptoms were identified via centrality indices and bridge centrality indices, respectively. Network stability was examined using the case-dropping procedure. RESULTS: Irritability, Uncontrollable worry, Trouble relaxing, and Depressed mood had the highest centrality values. Three bridge symptoms (Depressed mood, Nervousness, and Anhedonia) were also identified. Neither gender nor region of residence was associated with network global strength, distribution of edge weights or individual edge weights. LIMITATIONS: Data were collected in a cross-sectional study design, therefore, causal relations and dynamic changes between anxiety and depressive symptoms over time could not be inferred. Generalizability of findings may be limited to Chinese nursing students during a particular phase of the current pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Irritability, Uncontrollable worry, Trouble relaxing, and Depressed mood constituted central symptoms maintaining the anxiety-depression network structure of Chinese nursing students during the pandemic. Timely, systemic multi-level interventions targeting central symptoms and bridge symptoms may be effective in alleviating co-occurring experiences of anxiety and depression in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 665507, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259397

ABSTRACT

Background: The prevalence of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in COVID-19 survivors is unclear. This study examined the prevalence of PTSS and its association with quality of life (QOL) among COVID-19 survivors during the post-COVID-19 era in China. Methods: This was a comparative, cross-sectional study. PTSS, depressive symptoms, and QOL were assessed with standardized instruments. Results: A total of 134 COVID-19 survivors and 214 non-infected controls (healthy controls hereafter) were recruited. Among COVID-19 survivors, the PTSS prevalence was 18.66% (95%CI: 11.98-25.34%), which was significantly higher than that (5.61%, 95%CI: 2.50-8.71%) of healthy controls (P < 0.001). After controlling for covariates, an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that COVID-19 survivors had a higher PTSS total score than did healthy controls [F (1,348) = 4.664, P = 0.032]. A separate ANCOVA revealed there were no significant differences in overall QOL between COVID-19 survivors with and without PTSS [F (1,348) = 1.067, P = 0.304]. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that more severe depressive symptoms were significantly associated with PTSS in COVID-19 survivors (OR = 1.425, P < 0.001). Conclusions: PTSS were more severe in COVID-19 survivors compared to healthy controls in the post-COVID-19 era. Considering their negative impact on daily life and functional outcomes, regular assessment and appropriate treatments of PTSS should be conducted in COVID-19 survivors.

8.
Global Health ; 17(1): 54, 2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220233

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is closely associated with physical and mental health problems; however, little is known about the severity of stigma caused by COVID-19 among its survivors. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare differences in stigma experiences of COVID-19 survivors versus healthy controls after the COVID-19 outbreak peak in China. METHODS: This cross-sectional study comprised 154 COVID-19 survivors and 194 healthy controls recruited through consecutive and convenience sampling methods, respectively. COVID-19 related stigma was measured by the Social Impact Scale (SIS). Stigma differences between the two groups were compared with analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and a generalized linear model (GLM) was used to identify independent correlates of COVID-19-related stigma in this study. RESULTS: Compared with healthy controls, COVID-19 survivors reported more overall stigma (F(1,347) = 60.82, p < 0.001), and stigma in domains of social rejection (F(1,347) = 56.54, p < 0.001), financial insecurity (F(1,347) = 19.96, p < 0.001), internalized shame (F(1,347) = 71.40, p < 0.001) and social isolation (F(1,347) = 34.73, p < 0.001). Status as a COVID-19 survivor, having family members infected with COVID-19, being married, economic loss during the COVID-19 pandemic, and depressive symptoms were positively associated with higher overall stigma levels (all p values < 0.05). CONCLUSION: COVID-19-related stigma is commonly experienced among COVID-19 survivors even though the outbreak has been well-contained in China. Routine assessment of stigma experiences should be conducted on COVID-19 survivors and appropriate psychological assistance, public education, and anti-stigma campaigns and policies should be enforced to reduce stigma within this vulnerable subpopulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Social Stigma , Socioeconomic Factors , Adult , Analysis of Variance , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Correlation of Data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data
9.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 649989, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211874

ABSTRACT

Background: Workplace violence is a major concern for clinicians worldwide. There has been little data on the epidemiology of workplace violence against frontline clinicians during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study examined the pattern of workplace violence and its association with quality of life (QOL) against frontline clinicians during the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic in China. Methods: A cross-sectional online study was conducted in China between March 15 and March 20, 2020. Frontline clinicians' experience with workplace violence was measured with six standardized questions derived from the Workplace Violence Scale, while anxiety, depressive, and insomnia symptoms, and QOL were measured using the General Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Insomnia Severity Index, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire, respectively. Univariate analyses, multivariable logistic regression analyses, and structural equation modeling (SEM) were conducted. Results: A total of 15,531 clinicians completed the assessment; 2,878 (18.5, 95% CI = 17.92-19.14%) reported workplace violence during the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic (verbal violence: 16.1%; physical violence: 6.9%). According to multivariable models, key correlates of workplace violence were male gender, longer work experience, higher education level, smoking, working in the psychiatry or emergency department, working in tertiary hospitals, being involved in direct care of infected patients, having infected family/ friends/ colleagues, and frequently using social communication programs. Clinicians working in inpatient departments were less likely to report workplace violence compared to those working in outpatient departments. SEM analysis revealed that both violence and emotional disturbances (anxiety, depression, and insomnia) directly affected QOL (standardized direct effect = -0.031, and -0.566, respectively, P < 0.05), while emotional disturbances partly mediated the association between work violence and QOL (standardized indirect effect = -0.184, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Frontline clinicians were vulnerable to workplace violence during the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the negative impact of workplace violence on quality of care and clinicians' QOL, health authorities and policymakers should take effective measures to reduce workplace violence against clinicians.

10.
PeerJ ; 9: e11037, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1200332

ABSTRACT

Objective: Exposure to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was associated with high risk of mental health problems among frontline nurses. This study examined the prevalence of depressive symptoms (depression hereafter) and its impact on quality of life (QOL) in otorhinolaryngology (ENT) nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. Methods: An online study was conducted between March 15 and March 20, 2020. Depression and QOL were assessed using standardized instruments. Results: A total of 1,757 participants were recruited. The prevalence of depression was 33.75% (95% CI: 31.59%-35.97%). Results emerging from multiple logistic regression analysis showed that direct care of COVID-19 patients (OR: 1.441, 95% CI: 1.031-2.013, P = 0.032), and current smoking (OR: 2.880, 95% CI: 1.018-8.979, P = 0.048) were significantly associated with depression. After controlling for covariates, ENT nurses with depression had a lower overall QOL compared to those without depression (F(1, 1757)= 536.80, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Depression was common among ENT nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. Considering the negative impact of depression on QOL and care quality, regular screening for depression should be conducted in ENT nurses and treatment should be provided.

11.
PeerJ ; 9: e11154, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184016

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, all teaching activities in nursing schools were suspended in China, and many nursing students were summoned to work in hospitals to compensate for the shortage of manpower. This study examined the prevalence of fatigue and its association with quality of life (QOL) among nursing students during the post-COVID-19 era in China. Methods: This was a multicenter, cross-sectional study. Nursing students in five Chinese universities were invited to participate. Fatigue, depressive and anxiety symptoms, pain and QOL were measured using standardized instruments. Results: A total of 1,070 nursing students participated. The prevalence of fatigue was 67.3% (95% CI [64.4-70.0]). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that male gender (P = 0.003, OR = 1.73, 95% CI [1.20-2.49]), and being a senior nursing student (second year: OR = 2.20, 95% CI [1.46-3.33], P < 0.001; third year: OR = 3.53, 95% CI [2.31-5.41], P < 0.001; and fourth year OR = 3.59, 95% CI [2.39-5.40], P < 0.001) were significantly associated with more severe fatigue. In addition, moderate economic loss during the COVID-19 pandemic (OR = 1.48, 95% CI [1.08-3.33], P < 0.015; compared to low loss), participants with more severe depressive (OR = 1.48, 95% CI [1.22-1.78], P < 0.001) and anxiety symptoms (OR = 1.12, 95% CI [1.05-1.20], P = 0.001), and more severe pain (OR = 1.67, 95%CI [1.46-1.91], P < 0.001) were significantly associated with reported more severe fatigue. After controlling for covariates, nursing students with fatigue had a lower overall QOL score compared to those without (F (1, 1070) = 31.4, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Fatigue was common among nursing students in the post-COVID-19 era. Considering the negative impact of fatigue on QOL and daily functioning, routine physical and mental health screening should be conducted for nursing students. Effective stress-reduction measures should be enforced to assist this subpopulation to combat fatigue and restore optimal health.

12.
J Affect Disord ; 287: 145-157, 2021 05 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1126896

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are associated with various psychiatric comorbidities. This is a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in all subpopulations during the SARS and COVID-19 epidemics. A systematic literature search was conducted in major international (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, PsycINFO) and Chinese (China National Knowledge Internet [CNKI] and Wanfang) databases to identify studies reporting prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in all subpopulations during the SARS and COVID-19 epidemics. Data analyses were conducted using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis Version 2.0 (CMA V2.0). Eighty-two studies involving 96,100 participants were included. The overall prevalence of depressive symptoms (depression hereinafter), anxiety symptoms (anxiety hereinafter), stress, distress, insomnia symptoms, post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and poor mental health during the COVID-19 epidemic were 23.9% (95% CI: 18.4%-30.3%), 23.4% (95% CI: 19.9%-27.3%), 14.2% (95% CI: 8.4%-22.9%), 16.0% (95% CI: 8.4%-28.5%), 26.5% (95% CI: 19.1%-35.5%), 24.9% (95% CI: 11.0%-46.8%), and 19.9% (95% CI: 11.7%-31.9%), respectively. Prevalence of poor mental health was higher in general populations than in health professionals (29.0% vs. 11.6%; Q=10.99, p=0.001). The prevalence of depression, anxiety, PTSS and poor mental health were similar between SARS and COVID-19 epidemics (all p values>0.05). Psychiatric comorbidities were common in different subpopulations during both the SARS and COVID-19 epidemics. Considering the negative impact of psychiatric comorbidities on health and wellbeing, timely screening and appropriate interventions for psychiatric comorbidities should be conducted for subpopulations affected by such serious epidemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , Anxiety , China , Depression , Humans , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology
13.
Int J Biol Sci ; 17(3): 683-688, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1120711

ABSTRACT

This was a national survey that determined the prevalence of depressive symptoms (depression thereafter) and its relationship with quality of life (QOL) in frontline clinicians working in psychiatric hospitals in China during the COVID-19 pandemic. Depression and QOL were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire nine items (PHQ-9) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-brief version (WHOQOL-BREF), respectively. Multivariable logistic regression analyses and analysis of covariance were used. A total of 10,516 frontline clinicians participated in this study, of which, 28.52% (n=2,999) met screening criteria for depression. Compared to those without depression, clinicians with depression had a lower quality of life (F (1, 10515) =2874.66, P<0.001). Higher educational level (OR=1.225, P=0.014), if the number of COVID-19 patients in the hospital catchment area surpassed 500 (OR=1.146, P=0.032), having family/friends/colleagues who were infected (OR=1.695, P<0.001), being a current smoker (OR=1.533, P<0.001), and longer working hours (OR=1.020, P=0.022) were independently associated with higher risk of depression. Living with family members (OR=0.786, P<0.001), and being junior clinicians (OR=0.851, P=0.011) were independently associated with lower odds of depression. The results showed that depression was common in frontline psychiatric clinicians during the COVID-19 pandemic. Timely assessment and effective interventions of depression for frontline clinicians in psychiatric hospitals were warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Pandemics , Psychiatry , Quality of Life , Adult , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
J Psychiatr Res ; 135: 289-293, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039457

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Mental health professionals are often exposed to workplace violence (WPV) in China. This study examined the prevalence of WPV and the associated factors and quality of life (QOL) among frontline mental health professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This national survey was carried out between March 15 and March 20, 2020. WPV and QOL were assessed with standardized measures. RESULTS: A total of 10,516 participants were included. The prevalence of overall WPV was 18.5% (95% CI: 17.9%-19.3%), while verbal abuse/threats was 15.8% and physical violence was 8.4%. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that male gender (OR = 1.42, p < 0.01), higher educational level (OR = 1.40, p < 0.01), working in tertiary hospitals (OR = 1.33, p < 0.01), caring for COVID-19 patients (OR = 3.10, p < 0.01) and having more severe anxiety symptom (OR = 1.21, p < 0.01) were positively associated with WPV. In contrast, working in inpatient departments (OR = 0.74, p < 0.01), having longer work experience (OR = 0.99, p = 0.03), and being a junior nurse (OR = 0.73, p < 0.01) were negatively associated with WPV. After controlling for the covariates, mental health professionals who experienced WPV had a lower overall QOL compared to those without WPV (F(1, 10515) = 68.28, p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: This study found that WPV was common among mental health professionals in China during the COVID-19 pandemic. Considering the negative impact of WPV on QOL and quality of patient care, appropriate measures to prevent WPV should be developed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life , Workplace Violence/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence
15.
Global Health ; 16(1): 75, 2020 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721311

ABSTRACT

The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been found in more than 200 countries worldwide since December, 2019. In China, a major reason for the rapid transmission of the COVID-19 in early stage of the outbreak is the huge numbers of passengers boarding their "last train home" to meet family members during the Spring Festival. Most of these travelers were internal migrant workers. In order to reduce the risk of the COVID-19 transmission, public transportation networks were suspended, and many migrant workers who returned to their hometowns needed to be quarantined for 2 weeks, which led to the delay of returning back to cities to work. Many businesses have temporarily closed because of the risk of COVID-19 transmission, leading to unemployment of many workers. Sudden loss of income and further quarantine enforcement in cities can exacerbate existing mental health problems or trigger new mental disorders among affected migrant workers. However, to date no specific guidelines or strategies about mental health services of migrant workers have been released. Health authorities and professionals should pay more attention to this vulnerable group and provide timely mental health service support for those in need.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Emergency Services, Psychiatric , Health Services Needs and Demand , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Transients and Migrants/psychology , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
16.
Int J Biol Sci ; 16(13): 2265-2270, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689141

ABSTRACT

The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) epidemic in China has presented substantial challenges to traditional forms of mental health service delivery. This review summarizes the expert consensus on the mental health treatment and services for severe psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 outbreak developed by the Chinese Society of Psychiatry and other academic associations. The Expert Recommendations on Managing Patients with Mental Disorders during a Serious Infectious Disease Outbreak (COVID-19) outline the appropriate measures for psychiatric hospitals or psychiatric units in general hospitals, including the delivery of outpatient, inpatient, and community mental health services. The Expert Recommendations on Internet and Telehealth in Psychiatry during Major Public Health Crises (COVID-19) describe the assessment and treatment issues of internet-based mental health services during the COVID-19 outbreak. The expert consensus recommendations provide guidance for mental health professionals in managing psychiatric services during the COVID-19 outbreak in China. The experiences from China in addressing the challenges in the management of major psychiatric disorders may be useful and relevant to other countries who are combating the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Community Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Consensus , Humans , Inpatients , Internet , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Outpatients , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine
17.
Int J Biol Sci ; 16(10): 1741-1744, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-24913

ABSTRACT

Recently, more than 300 Chinese patients with psychiatric disorders were diagnosed with the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Possible reasons quoted in the report were the lack of caution regarding the COVID-19 outbreak in January and insufficient supplies of protective gear. We outlined major challenges for patients with psychiatric disorders and mental health professionals during the COVID-19 outbreak, and also discussed how to manage these challenges through further mental health service reform in China.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Mental Health Services/supply & distribution , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Disease Outbreaks , Health Care Reform , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Psychiatry , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Int J Biol Sci ; 16(10): 1732-1738, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-24910

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been rapidly transmitted in China, Macau, Hong Kong, and other Asian and European counterparts. This COVID-19 epidemic has aroused increasing attention nationwide. Patients, health professionals, and the general public are under insurmountable psychological pressure which may lead to various psychological problems, such as anxiety, fear, depression, and insomnia. Psychological crisis intervention plays a pivotal role in the overall deployment of the disease control. The National Health Commission of China has summoned a call for emergency psychological crisis intervention and thus, various mental health associations and organizations have established expert teams to compile guidelines and public health educational articles/videos for mental health professionals and the general public alongside with online mental health services. In addition, mental health professionals and expert groups are stationed in designated isolation hospitals to provide on-site services. Experts have reached a consensus on the admission of patients with severe mental illness during the COVID-19 outbreak in mental health institutions. Nevertheless, the rapid transmission of the COVID-19 has emerged to mount a serious challenge to the mental health service in China.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Anxiety , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Depression , Disease Outbreaks , Fear , Humans , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
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