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1.
Front Psychol ; 14: 1131176, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236973

ABSTRACT

Background: Since the start of the coronavirus 2019 pandemic, people have faced many challenges, including in relation to sleep quality and psychological health. This study aims to analyze the association between sleep quality and psychological symptoms among university students in China, and to provide reference data to facilitate the development of interventions to improve the physical and mental health of university students. Methods: A stratified cluster sampling method was used to investigate the sleep quality and psychological symptoms of 6,363 university students in China. The Chi-square test was used to analyze differences in sleep quality among groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the association between sleep quality and psychological symptoms. Results: The proportions of Chinese university students with good, medium, and poor sleep quality were 25.73, 10.99, and 63.28%, respectively. The overall rate of psychological symptoms was 16.5%. Logistic regression analysis showed that, in general, university students with poor sleep quality had a higher risk of psychological symptoms than those with good sleep quality (OR = 1.53, 95%CI: 1.28, 1.84, p < 0.01). Compared with university students with good sleep quality, those with poor sleep quality were more likely to experience emotional symptoms (OR = 1.62, 95%CI: 1.36, 1.94), behavioral symptoms (OR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.3, 1.84), and difficulties with social adaptation (OR = 1.84, 95% CI: 1.51, 2.25) (all p < 0.01). Conclusion: There was an association between sleep quality and psychological symptoms among Chinese university students. University students with poor sleep quality have a higher risk of psychological symptoms. Measures should be taken to improve the sleep quality of university students and reduce the incidence of psychological symptoms. This study provides reference data for government and education departments that could inform public health policies.

2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(4)2023 Feb 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2237587

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Assessing the dairy consumption and psychological symptoms of Chinese college students as a reference for the mental health of Chinese college students. METHODS: A three-stage stratified whole-group sampling method was used to investigate dairy consumption and psychological symptoms among 5904 (2554 male students, accounting for 43.3% of the sample) college students in the Yangtze River Delta region. The mean age of the subjects was 20.13 ± 1.24 years. Psychological symptoms were surveyed using the Brief Questionnaire for the Assessment of Adolescent Mental Health. The detection rates of emotional problems, behavioral symptoms, social adaptation difficulties and psychological symptoms among college students with different dairy consumption habits were analyzed using chi-square tests. The association between dairy consumption and psychological symptoms was assessed using a logistic regression model. RESULTS: College students from the "Yangtze River Delta" region of China participated in the study, of which 1022 (17.31%) had psychological symptoms. The proportions of participants with dairy consumption of ≤2 times/week, 3-5 times/week, and ≥6 times/week were 25.68%, 42.09%, and 32.23%, respectively. Using dairy consumption ≥6 times/week as a reference, multifactor logistic regression analysis showed that college students with dairy consumption ≤2 times/week (OR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.71) were at higher risk of psychological symptoms (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, Chinese college students with lower dairy consumption exhibited higher detection rates of psychological symptoms. Dairy consumption was negatively associated with the occurrence of psychological symptoms. Our study provides a basis for mental health education and increasing knowledge about nutrition among Chinese college students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Humans , Male , Young Adult , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Mental Health , Students/psychology , China/epidemiology
3.
Children (Basel) ; 9(8)2022 Aug 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1987675

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of COVID-19 has seriously threatened the health of people around the world. To prevent the spread of the epidemic, Chinese universities have implemented closed management of campuses. The implementation of restrictive measures has gradually caused changes in the quality of sleep and the psychological state of college students. In addition, college students are faced with the dual pressure of employment and study, and the psychological pressure is huge. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate sleep and depressive symptoms among college students. METHODS: Using the method of stratified cluster sampling, 6695 college students were selected from three universities in Jiangxi, Anhui, and Xinjiang provinces from April to May 2022. The Chinese version of the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) and the self-rating depression scale (SDS) were used for the survey. Hierarchical logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between the PSQI and the SDS. RESULTS: Overall, during the outbreak of COVID-19, 69.0% of males and 73.5% of females had poor sleep quality among Chinese college students and the detection rate of depressive symptoms was 43.6% for males and 47.8% for females, respectively. Taking students with good sleep quality as references, after controlling for covariates, hierarchical logistic regression shows that Chinese college students with poor sleep quality have a higher OR value (OR = 12.0, 95%CI: 10.2~14.1, p < 0.001), especially in males (OR = 43.8, 95%CI:30.2~63.6, p < 0.001). For both males and females, the OR value of college students with the following characteristics was higher: rural college students (males, OR = 50.32, 95%CI: 32.50-77.93; females, OR = 8.03, 95%CI: 6.45-9.99), overweight college students (males, OR = 62.17, 95%CI: 19.47-198.53; females, OR = 16.67, 95%CI: 6.48-42.88), and college students drinking sugar-sweetened beverages (males, OR = 59.00, 95%CI: 36.96-94.18; females, OR = 8.16, 95%CI: 6.63-10.05) (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Poor sleep quality is associated with depressive symptoms among Chinese college students, especially college males. Our research suggests that it is necessary to consider the improvement of sleep quality and depressive symptoms among college students during the COVID-19 epidemic.

4.
Front Immunol ; 13: 827605, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742217

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has become a public health emergency of international concern, and an effective vaccine is urgently needed to control the pandemic. Envelope (E) and membrane (M) proteins are highly conserved structural proteins among SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV and have been proposed as potential targets for the development of cross-protective vaccines. Here, synthetic DNA vaccines encoding SARS-CoV-2 E/M proteins (called p-SARS-CoV-2-E/M) were developed, and mice were immunised with three doses via intramuscular injection and electroporation. Significant cellular immune responses were elicited, whereas no robust humoral immunity was detected. In addition, novel H-2d-restricted T-cell epitopes were identified. Notably, although no drop in lung tissue virus titre was detected in DNA-vaccinated mice post-challenge with SARS-CoV-2, immunisation with either p-SARS-CoV-2-E or p-SARS-CoV-2-M provided minor protection and co-immunisation with p-SARS-CoV-2-E+M increased protection. Therefore, E/M proteins should be considered as vaccine candidates as they may be valuable in the optimisation of vaccination strategies against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus M Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , Female , Humans , Immunization , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Vaccine Efficacy , Vaccines, DNA
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