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1.
BMC Endocr Disord ; 21(1): 228, 2021 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518273

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome novel coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly worldwide. SARS-CoV-2 has been found to cause multiple organ damage; however, little attention has been paid to the damage to the endocrine system caused by this virus, and the subsequent impact on prognosis. This may be the first research on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis and prognosis in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: In this retrospective observational study, 235 patients were admitted to the hospital with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection from 22 January to 17 March 2020. Clinical characteristics, laboratory findings, and treatments were obtained from electronic medical records with standard data collection forms and compared among patients with different thyroid function status. RESULTS: Among 235 patients, 17 (7.23%) had subclinical hypothyroidism, 11 (4.68%) severe non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS), and 23 (9.79%) mild to moderate NTIS. Composite endpoint events of each group, including mortality, admission to the ICU, and using IMV were observed. Compared with normal thyroid function, the hazard ratios (HRs) of composite endpoint events for mild to moderate NTIS, severe NTIS, subclinical hypothyroidism were 27.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.07-105.7), 23.1 (95% CI 5.75-92.8), and 4.04 (95% CI 0.69-23.8) respectively. The multivariate-adjusted HRs for acute cardiac injury among patients with NTF, subclinical hypothyroidism, severe NTIS, and mild to moderate NTIS were 1.00, 1.68 (95% CI 0.56-5.05), 4.68 (95% CI 1.76-12.4), and 2.63 (95% CI 1.09-6.36) respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that the suppression of the HPT axis could be a common complication in COVID-19 patients and an indicator of the severity of prognosis. Among the three different types of thyroid dysfunction with COVID-19, mild to moderate NTIS and severe NTIS have a higher risk of severe outcomes compared with subclinical hypothyroidism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Euthyroid Sick Syndromes/etiology , Hypertension/etiology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Retrospective Studies , Sex Factors
2.
Practical Geriatrics ; 34(7):750-753, 2020.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1478172

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the reasons for head face pressure injury caused by protective equipment during the prevention and control of COVID-19.

3.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 727419, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444039

ABSTRACT

Background: Blood parameters, such as neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, have been identified as reliable inflammatory markers with diagnostic and predictive value for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, novel hematological parameters derived from high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) have rarely been studied as indicators for the risk of poor outcomes in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Here, we aimed to assess the prognostic value of these novel biomarkers in COVID-19 patients and the diabetes subgroup. Methods: We conducted a multicenter retrospective cohort study involving all hospitalized patients with COVID-19 from January to March 2020 in five hospitals in Wuhan, China. Demographics, clinical and laboratory findings, and outcomes were recorded. Neutrophil to HDL-C ratio (NHR), monocyte to HDL-C ratio (MHR), lymphocyte to HDL-C ratio (LHR), and platelet to HDL-C ratio (PHR) were investigated and compared in both the overall population and the subgroup with diabetes. The associations between blood parameters at admission with primary composite end-point events (including mechanical ventilation, admission to the intensive care unit, or death) were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare the utility of different blood parameters. Results: Of 440 patients with COVID-19, 67 (15.2%) were critically ill. On admission, HDL-C concentration was decreased while NHR was high in patients with critical compared with non-critical COVID-19, and were independently associated with poor outcome as continuous variables in the overall population (HR: 0.213, 95% CI 0.090-0.507; HR: 1.066, 95% CI 1.030-1.103, respectively) after adjusting for confounding factors. Additionally, when HDL-C and NHR were examined as categorical variables, the HRs and 95% CIs for tertile 3 vs. tertile 1 were 0.280 (0.128-0.612) and 4.458 (1.817-10.938), respectively. Similar results were observed in the diabetes subgroup. ROC curves showed that the NHR had good performance in predicting worse outcomes. The cutoff point of the NHR was 5.50. However, the data in our present study could not confirm the possible predictive effect of LHR, MHR, and PHR on COVID-19 severity. Conclusion: Lower HDL-C concentrations and higher NHR at admission were observed in patients with critical COVID-19 than in those with noncritical COVID-19, and were significantly associated with a poor prognosis in COVID-19 patients as well as in the diabetes subgroup.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cholesterol, HDL/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , China , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Leukocytes/cytology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
4.
Drug Evaluation Research ; 43(9):1701-1705, 2020.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1395262

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, COVID-19 had spread many countries, attracting high attention from the world. Its infectivity is strong, harm is big, at present there is no definite effective antiviral drug. Recently, the national health commission released the latest "new coronavirus pneumonia diagnosis and treatment program (trial seventh edition)", which for the first time proposed immunotherapy program based on Tocilizumab (TCZ). In this paper, firstly, a review of articles on the treatment of immune system diseases with TCZ at home and abroad was conducted to analyze the effectiveness of TCZ in the treatment of severe and critical COVID-19. Then, from the safety point of view, the drug interactions, drug use in special population, adverse reactions and medication precautions were presented in detail, which can be used as a medication reference for the treatment of COVID-19 severe and critical patients.

5.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 11: 525, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690147

ABSTRACT

Background: Diabetes correlates with poor prognosis in patients with COVID-19, but very few studies have evaluated whether impaired fasting glucose (IFG) is also a risk factor for the poor outcomes of patients with COVID-19. Here we aimed to examine the associations between IFG and diabetes at admission with risks of complications and mortality among patients with COVID-19. Methods: In this multicenter retrospective cohort study, we enrolled 312 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 from 5 hospitals in Wuhan from Jan 1 to Mar 17, 2020. Clinical information, laboratory findings, complications, treatment regimens, and mortality status were collected. The associations between hyperglycemia and diabetes status at admission with primary composite end-point events (including mechanical ventilation, admission to intensive care unit, or death) were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results: The median age of the patients was 57 years (interquartile range 38-66), and 172 (55%) were women. At the time of hospital admission, 84 (27%) had diabetes (and 36 were new-diagnosed), 62 (20%) had IFG, and 166 (53%) had normal fasting glucose (NFG) levels. Compared to patients with NFG, patients with IFG and diabetes developed more primary composite end-point events (9 [5%], 11 [18%], 26 [31%]), including receiving mechanical ventilation (5 [3%], 6 [10%], 21 [25%]), and death (4 [2%], 9 [15%], 20 [24%]). Multivariable Cox regression analyses showed diabetes was associated increased risks of primary composite end-point events (hazard ratio 3.53; 95% confidence interval 1.48-8.40) and mortality (6.25; 1.91-20.45), and IFG was associated with an increased risk of mortality (4.11; 1.15-14.74), after adjusting for age, sex, hospitals and comorbidities. Conclusion: IFG and diabetes at admission were associated with higher risks of adverse outcomes among patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Glucose/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Diabetes Complications/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology , Glucose Intolerance/complications , Hyperglycemia/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Fasting , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Glucose Intolerance/virology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperglycemia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate
6.
Diabetes Obes Metab ; 22(10): 1897-1906, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-436533

ABSTRACT

AIM: To evaluate the association between different degrees of hyperglycaemia and the risk of all-cause mortality among hospitalized patients with COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a retrospective study conducted from 22 January to 17 March 2020, 453 patients were admitted to Union Hospital in Wuhan, China, with laboratory-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. Patients were classified into four categories: normal glucose, hyperglycaemia (fasting glucose 5.6-6.9 mmol/L and/or HbA1c 5.7%-6.4%), newly diagnosed diabetes (fasting glucose ≥7 mmol/L and/or HbA1c ≥6.5%) and known diabetes. The major outcomes included in-hospital mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). RESULTS: Patients with newly diagnosed diabetes constituted the highest percentage to be admitted to the ICU (11.7%) and require IMV (11.7%), followed by patients with known diabetes (4.1%; 9.2%) and patients with hyperglycaemia (6.2%; 4.7%), compared with patients with normal glucose (1.5%; 2.3%), respectively. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios of mortality among COVID-19 patients with normal glucose, hyperglycaemia, newly diagnosed diabetes and known diabetes were 1.00, 3.29 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65-16.6), 9.42 (95% CI 2.18-40.7) and 4.63 (95% CI 1.02-21.0), respectively. CONCLUSION: We showed that COVID-19 patients with newly diagnosed diabetes had the highest risk of all-cause mortality compared with COVID-19 patients with known diabetes, hyperglycaemia and normal glucose. Patients with COVID-19 need to be kept under surveillance for blood glucose screening.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Diseases/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Aged , Asymptomatic Diseases/therapy , Blood Glucose/physiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/mortality , Hyperglycemia/therapy , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
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