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1.
Eur Heart J Case Rep ; 5(10): ytab327, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493785

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) continues to be a pandemic worldwide. Lung transplantation is the last option to increase life expectancy of end-stage COVID-19 patients. Branch pulmonary artery stenosis (PAS) is a rare complication after lung transplantation with an extremely poor prognosis. The current trend in the management of branch PAS is percutaneous balloon angioplasty and/or stent implantation, rather than high-risk reoperation with a lower success rate. CASE SUMMARY: The subject was a 54-year-old male with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection who underwent a double-lung transplantation. He suffered hypoxaemia and right heart dysfunction following the operation. Right cardiac catheterization and pulmonary angiography examination revealed severe stenosis of the right branch pulmonary artery. Due to immunosuppression and reduced coagulation function, the patient underwent pulmonary artery balloon dilatation and stent implantation, and ultimately recovered well. DISCUSSION: The combination of balloon dilatation and stent implantation is a good alternative to reoperation for patients with COVID-19.

4.
SciFinder; 2020.
Preprint | SciFinder | ID: ppcovidwho-5228

ABSTRACT

A review on orthopedic diagnosis and treatment during epidemic period of New Coronavirus Pneumonia: suggestions for standardized processes

5.
Comput Struct Biotechnol J ; 18: 2200-2208, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-738407

ABSTRACT

In less than eight months, the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) caused by the SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) virus has resulted in over 20,000,000 confirmed cases and over 700,000 deaths around the world. With the increasing worldwide spreading of this disease, the lack of effective drugs against SARS-CoV-2 infection makes the situation even more dangerous and unpredictable. Although many forces are speeding up to develop prevention and treatment therapeutics, it is unlikely that any de novo drugs will be available in months. Drug repurposing holds the promise to significantly save the time for drug development, since it could use existing clinic drugs to treat new diseases. Based on the "steric-clashes alleviating receptor (SCAR)" strategy developed in our lab recently, we screened the library of clinic and investigational drugs, and identified nine drugs that might be repurposed as covalent inhibitors of the priming proteases (cathepsin B, cathepsin L, and TMPRSS2) of the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2. Among these hits, five are known covalent inhibitors, and one is an anti-virus drug. Therefore, we hope our work would provide rational and timely help for developing anti-SARS-CoV-2 drugs.

6.
Bioinformatics ; 36(11): 3295-3298, 2020 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-27689

ABSTRACT

MOTIVATION: Since December 2019, the newly identified coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has caused a massive health crisis worldwide and resulted in over 70 000 COVID-19 infections so far. Clinical drugs targeting SARS-CoV-2 are urgently needed to decrease the high fatality rate of confirmed COVID-19 patients. Traditional de novo drug discovery needs more than 10 years, so drug repurposing seems the best option currently to find potential drugs for treating COVID-19. RESULTS: Compared with traditional non-covalent drugs, covalent drugs have attracted escalating attention recent years due to their advantages in potential specificity upon careful design, efficiency and patient burden. We recently developed a computational protocol named as SCAR (steric-clashes alleviating receptors) for discovering covalent drugs. In this work, we used the SCAR protocol to identify possible covalent drugs (approved or clinically tested) targeting the main protease (3CLpro) of SARS-CoV-2. We identified 11 potential hits, among which at least six hits were exclusively enriched by the SCAR protocol. Since the preclinical or clinical information of these identified drugs is already available, they might be ready for being clinically tested in the treatment of COVID-19. CONTACT: senliu.ctgu@gmail.com.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Cysteine Endopeptidases , Drug Delivery Systems , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , SARS Virus , Viral Nonstructural Proteins , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , Coronavirus 3C Proteases , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Cysteine Endopeptidases/drug effects , Humans , Peptide Hydrolases/drug effects , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/drug effects
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