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1.
Nat Rev Cardiol ; 18(11): 785-802, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815550

ABSTRACT

High blood pressure is one of the most important risk factors for ischaemic heart disease, stroke, other cardiovascular diseases, chronic kidney disease and dementia. Mean blood pressure and the prevalence of raised blood pressure have declined substantially in high-income regions since at least the 1970s. By contrast, blood pressure has risen in East, South and Southeast Asia, Oceania and sub-Saharan Africa. Given these trends, the prevalence of hypertension is now higher in low-income and middle-income countries than in high-income countries. In 2015, an estimated 8.5 million deaths were attributable to systolic blood pressure >115 mmHg, 88% of which were in low-income and middle-income countries. Measures such as increasing the availability and affordability of fresh fruits and vegetables, lowering the sodium content of packaged and prepared food and staples such as bread, and improving the availability of dietary salt substitutes can help lower blood pressure in the entire population. The use and effectiveness of hypertension treatment vary substantially across countries. Factors influencing this variation include a country's financial resources, the extent of health insurance and health facilities, how frequently people interact with physicians and non-physician health personnel, whether a clear and widely adopted clinical guideline exists and the availability of medicines. Scaling up treatment coverage and improving its community effectiveness can substantially reduce the health burden of hypertension.


Subject(s)
Global Health , Hypertension , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/therapy
2.
Urban Climate ; 43:101150, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1740248

ABSTRACT

In this study, TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) observations were resampled to obtain 0.01° × 0.01° NO2 VCD (vertical column density) over Yangtze River Delta (YRD), China. Based on this high spatial resolution satellite observations, NO2 VCDs in megacities cluster of YRD region were examined with a reduction of ~35% during COVID-19 lockdown. The adjusted Exponentially-Modified Gaussian (EMG) model was used to estimate the NOX emission in typical cities under regionally polluted YRD region. Taking 100 km of mass integration interval as an example, during 2018–2019, the averaged NOX emission of Shanghai, Hangzhou, Nanjing, and Ningbo is 139.65 mol/s, 84.49 mol/s, 79.87 mol/s and 88.73 mol/s, respectively. This estimation has a good correlation with Multi-resolution Emission Inventory for China (MEIC) emission with R more than 0.9 but lower results mainly due to the underestimation of NO2 VCD by TROPOMI in polluted areas. It was also found that the NOX emissions of Ningbo are higher than expected, which is closely related to massive ship emissions. This study indicates that this approach based on adjusted EMG model can enhance the ability to quantify NOX emissions at city level by utilizing the high spatial resolution observations of TROPOMI.

3.
Wellcome open research ; 6:279, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1732489

ABSTRACT

Background: Industrialised countries had varied responses to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and how they adapted to new situations and knowledge since it began. These differences in preparedness and policy may lead to different death tolls from COVID-19 as well as other diseases. Methods: We applied an ensemble of 16 Bayesian probabilistic models to vital statistics data to estimate the impacts of the pandemic on weekly all-cause mortality for 40 industrialised countries from mid-February 2020 through mid-February 2021, before a large segment of the population was vaccinated in these countries. Results: Over the entire year, an estimated 1,410,300 (95% credible interval 1,267,600-1,579,200) more people died in these countries than would have been expected had the pandemic not happened. This is equivalent to 141 (127-158) additional deaths per 100,000 people and a 15% (14-17) increase in deaths in all these countries combined. In Iceland, Australia and New Zealand, mortality was lower than would be expected if the pandemic had not occurred, while South Korea and Norway experienced no detectable change in mortality. In contrast, the USA, Czechia, Slovakia and Poland experienced at least 20% higher mortality. There was substantial heterogeneity across countries in the dynamics of excess mortality. The first wave of the pandemic, from mid-February to the end of May 2020, accounted for over half of excess deaths in Scotland, Spain, England and Wales, Canada, Sweden, Belgium, the Netherlands and Cyprus. At the other extreme, the period between mid-September 2020 and mid-February 2021 accounted for over 90% of excess deaths in Bulgaria, Croatia, Czechia, Hungary, Latvia, Montenegro, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia. Conclusions: Until the great majority of national and global populations have vaccine-acquired immunity, minimising the death toll of the pandemic from COVID-19 and other diseases will require actions to delay and contain infections and continue routine health care.

4.
Wellcome Open Res ; 6: 279, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732490

ABSTRACT

Background: Industrialised countries had varied responses to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and how they adapted to new situations and knowledge since it began. These differences in preparedness and policy may lead to different death tolls from COVID-19 as well as other diseases. Methods: We applied an ensemble of 16 Bayesian probabilistic models to vital statistics data to estimate the impacts of the pandemic on weekly all-cause mortality for 40 industrialised countries from mid-February 2020 through mid-February 2021, before a large segment of the population was vaccinated in these countries. Results: Over the entire year, an estimated 1,410,300 (95% credible interval 1,267,600-1,579,200) more people died in these countries than would have been expected had the pandemic not happened. This is equivalent to 141 (127-158) additional deaths per 100,000 people and a 15% (14-17) increase in deaths in all these countries combined. In Iceland, Australia and New Zealand, mortality was lower than would be expected if the pandemic had not occurred, while South Korea and Norway experienced no detectable change in mortality. In contrast, the USA, Czechia, Slovakia and Poland experienced at least 20% higher mortality. There was substantial heterogeneity across countries in the dynamics of excess mortality. The first wave of the pandemic, from mid-February to the end of May 2020, accounted for over half of excess deaths in Scotland, Spain, England and Wales, Canada, Sweden, Belgium, the Netherlands and Cyprus. At the other extreme, the period between mid-September 2020 and mid-February 2021 accounted for over 90% of excess deaths in Bulgaria, Croatia, Czechia, Hungary, Latvia, Montenegro, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia. Conclusions: Until the great majority of national and global populations have vaccine-acquired immunity, minimising the death toll of the pandemic from COVID-19 and other diseases will require actions to delay and contain infections and continue routine health care.

5.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264178, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731596

ABSTRACT

Renalase is a secreted flavoprotein with anti-inflammatory and pro-cell survival properties. COVID-19 is associated with disordered inflammation and apoptosis. We hypothesized that blood renalase levels would correspond to severe COVID-19 and survival. In this retrospective cohort study, clinicopathologic data and blood samples were collected from hospitalized COVID-19 subjects (March-June 2020) at a single institution tertiary hospital. Plasma renalase and cytokine levels were measured and clinical data abstracted from health records. Of 3,450 COVID-19 patients, 458 patients were enrolled. Patients were excluded if <18 years, or opted out of research. The primary composite outcome was intubation or death within 180 days. Secondary outcomes included mortality alone, intensive care unit admission, use of vasopressors, and CPR. Enrolled patients had mean age 64 years (SD±17), were 53% males, and 48% non-whites. Mean renalase levels was 14,108·4 ng/ml (SD±8,137 ng/ml). Compared to patients with high renalase, those with low renalase (< 8,922 ng/ml) were more likely to present with hypoxia, increased ICU admission (54% vs. 33%, p < 0.001), and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (10% vs. 4%, p = 0·023). In Cox proportional hazard model, every 1000 ng/ml increase in renalase decreased the risk of death or intubation by 5% (HR 0·95; 95% CI 0·91-0·98) and increased survival alone by 6% (HR 0·95; CI 0·90-0·98), after adjusting for socio-demographics, initial disease severity, comorbidities and inflammation. Patients with high renalase-low IL-6 levels had the best survival compared to other groups (p = 0·04). Renalase was independently associated with reduced intubation and mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Future studies should assess the pathophysiological relevance of renalase in COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Monoamine Oxidase/blood , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Endothelium/metabolism , Endothelium/pathology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Interleukin-6/blood , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Wellcome open research ; 6, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1728267

ABSTRACT

Background: Industrialised countries had varied responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, which may lead to different death tolls from COVID-19 and other diseases. Methods: We applied an ensemble of 16 Bayesian probabilistic models to vital statistics data to estimate the number of weekly deaths if the pandemic had not occurred for 40 industrialised countries and US states from mid-February 2020 through mid-February 2021. We subtracted these estimates from the actual number of deaths to calculate the impacts of the pandemic on all-cause mortality. Results: Over this year, there were 1,410,300 (95% credible interval 1,267,600-1,579,200) excess deaths in these countries, equivalent to a 15% (14-17) increase, and 141 (127-158) additional deaths per 100,000 people. In Iceland, Australia and New Zealand, mortality was lower than would be expected in the absence of the pandemic, while South Korea and Norway experienced no detectable change. The USA, Czechia, Slovakia and Poland experienced >20% higher mortality. Within the USA, Hawaii experienced no detectable change in mortality and Maine a 5% increase, contrasting with New Jersey, Arizona, Mississippi, Texas, California, Louisiana and New York which experienced >25% higher mortality. Mid-February to the end of May 2020 accounted for over half of excess deaths in Scotland, Spain, England and Wales, Canada, Sweden, Belgium, the Netherlands and Cyprus, whereas mid-September 2020 to mid-February 2021 accounted for >90% of excess deaths in Bulgaria, Croatia, Czechia, Hungary, Latvia, Montenegro, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia. In USA, excess deaths in the northeast were driven mainly by the first wave, in southern and southwestern states by the summer wave, and in the northern plains by the post-September period. Conclusions: Prior to widespread vaccine-acquired immunity, minimising the overall death toll of the pandemic requires policies and non-pharmaceutical interventions that delay and reduce infections, effective treatments for infected patients, and mechanisms to continue routine health care.

7.
China CDC Weekly ; 4(6):1-3, 2021.
Article in English | China CDC Weekly | ID: covidwho-1699561

ABSTRACT

Vaccines are a crucial weapon in combating the global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. At present, China is in a critical period of COVID-19 vaccination, and most of the approved vaccines are developed by inactivated vaccine technology, which contains the complete nucleic acid sequence of the virus (1-2). The inactivated COVID-19 vaccine may contaminate people and environments during the vaccination process, thus triggering a false alarm of the COVID-19 surveillance system. In this study, we selected some vaccination sites to assess the intensity and distribution of vaccine contamination.;;Before field study, we used Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) method with kits that produced by Da An Gene and ZJ Bio-Tech to estimate the signal strength of inactivated COVID-19 vaccine (SinovacBiotech). The average Cycle threshold (Ct) value of ORF1Ab /N gene of the vaccine solution was 15.30±0.77, while the Ct value of the kit’s positive control was 28.01±2.38.

8.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325219

ABSTRACT

In the middle of March, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection a global pandemic. While China experienced a dramatic decline in daily growth rate of COVID-19, multiple importations of new cases from other countries and their related local infections caused a rapid rise. Between March 12 and April 15, we collected nasopharyngeal samples from 109 imported cases from 25 countries and 69 local cases in Guangzhou, China. In order to characterize the transmission patterns and genetic evolution of this virus among different populations, we sequenced the genome of SARS-CoV-2. The imported viral strains were assigned to lineages distributed in Europe (33.0%), America (17.4%), Africa (25.7%), or Southeast/West Asia (23.9%). Importantly, 10 imported cases from Africa formed two novel sub-lineages not identified in global tree previously. A detailed analysis showed that the imported viral strains from Philippines and Pakistan were closely related and within the same sub-lineage, whereas Ethiopia had varied lineages in the African phylogenetic tree. In spite of the diversity of imported SARS-CoV-2, 60 of 69 local infections could be traced back to two specific small lineages imported from Africa. A combined genetic and epidemiological analysis revealed a high-resolution transmission network of the imported SARS-CoV-2 in local communities, which might help inform the public health response and genomic surveillance in other cities and regions. Finally, we observed in-frame deletions on seven loci of SARS-CoV-2 genome, some of which were intra-host mutations, and they exhibited no enrichment on the S protein. Our findings provide new insight into the viral phylodynamics of SARS-CoV-2 and beta coronavirus.

9.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-313360

ABSTRACT

The resurgence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been seen in many counties where outbreaks appear to be leveling off. While China experienced a dramatic decline of COVID-19 at the outset of 2020, regional outbreaks continuously emerged in recent months. In Guangzhou, a small outbreak emerged in March and April involving less than 100 residents, and a comprehensive and near-real-time genomic surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 was conducted. When confirmed cases among overseas travelers increased, public health authorities enhanced measures as shifting self-quarantine to central quarantine and SARS-CoV-2 testing for all overseas travelers. From 109 imported cases we found diverse viral variants distributing in the global viral phylogeny, which were usually shared within households but not among passengers on the same flight. Nonetheless, local transmission was predominately attributed to two specific variants imported from Africa, including the local cases who reported no direct/indirect contact with imported cases. The introducing events of the virus were identified or deduced before enhanced measures were taken. These results show that the interventions are effective in containing the spread of SARS-CoV-2, and also rule out the possibility of cryptic transmission of viral variants from the first wave in January and February. Moreover, we found that intra-host viral diversity was usually different between close contacts, implying a transmission bottleneck of SARS-CoV-2. Our study provides evidence and emphasizes the importance of controls for oversea travelers in the context of the pandemic, and exemplifies how viral genomic data facilitates COVID-19 surveillance and prevention.Funding: This study was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (31870079, 91953122, 31871326), National Science and Technology Major Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2017ZX10103011, 2018ZX10305410, 2018ZX10201001), Guangdong Provincial Novel Coronavirus Scientific and Technological Project (2020111107001), Guangdong Basic and Applied Basic Research Foundation (2020A1515010776 and 2020B1515020057) and the Beijing Nova Program (Z181100006218114 and Z181100006218110) to M.N. and P.L..Conflict of Interest: The authors declare no competing interests.Ethical Approval: This study was approved by the ethics committee of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of Guangzhou (GZCDC-ECHR-2020P0002). Written informed consent was obtained from patients about the surveillance and data related to disease control and further analysis. All information regarding individual persons has been anonymized in this study.

10.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-312702

ABSTRACT

To analyze the cause of atmospheric PM 2.5 pollution occurred during the COVID-19 lockdown in Nanning of Guangxi, China, Single Particulate Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, Aethalometer, Particulate Lidar, coupled with the monitoring of near-surface gaseous pollutants, meteorological conditions, remote fire spots sensing by satellite and Backward Trajectory Models were conducted during 18–24, Feb 2020. Three haze stages of pre-pollution period (PPP), pollution accumulation period (PAP) and pollution dissipation period (PDP) were identified. The dominant source of PM 2.5 in PPP was biomass burning (BB) (40.4%), followed by secondary inorganics (28.1%) and motor vehicle exhaust (11.7%). The PAP was characterized by a large abundance of secondary inorganics, which contributed for 56.1% of the total PM 2.5 concentration, followed by BB (17.4%). The absorption Ångström exponent (2.2) in PPP was higher than those of the other two periods. The analysis of fire spots monitored by remote satellite sensing indicated that open BB in regions around Nanning city could be one of the main facotrs matters. The planetary boundary layer-relative humidity-secondary particles matter-particulate matter positive feedback mechanism was employed to elucidate the atompheric process in this study. This study highlights the importance of understanding the role of BB and meteorology in air pollution formation to call for policy for emission control strategies.

11.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-316039

ABSTRACT

To prevent the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), preliminary temperature measurement and mask detection in public areas are conducted. However, the existing temperature measurement methods face the problems of safety and deployment. In this paper, to realize safe and accurate temperature measurement even when a person's face is partially obscured, we propose a cloud-edge-terminal collaborative system with a lightweight infrared temperature measurement model. A binocular camera with an RGB lens and a thermal lens is utilized to simultaneously capture image pairs. Then, a mobile detection model based on a multi-task cascaded convolutional network (MTCNN) is proposed to realize face alignment and mask detection on the RGB images. For accurate temperature measurement, we transform the facial landmarks on the RGB images to the thermal images by an affine transformation and select a more accurate temperature measurement area on the forehead. The collected information is uploaded to the cloud in real time for COVID-19 prevention. Experiments show that the detection model is only 6.1M and the average detection speed is 257ms. At a distance of 1m, the error of indoor temperature measurement is about 3%. That is, the proposed system can realize real-time temperature measurement in public areas.

12.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(12): 2217-2225, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595231

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We investigated patients with potential severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) reinfection in the United States during May-July 2020. METHODS: We conducted case finding for patients with potential SARS-CoV-2 reinfection through the Emerging Infections Network. Cases reported were screened for laboratory and clinical findings of potential reinfection followed by requests for medical records and laboratory specimens. Available medical records were abstracted to characterize patient demographics, comorbidities, clinical course, and laboratory test results. Submitted specimens underwent further testing, including reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), viral culture, whole genome sequencing, subgenomic RNA PCR, and testing for anti-SARS-CoV-2 total antibody. RESULTS: Among 73 potential reinfection patients with available records, 30 patients had recurrent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms explained by alternative diagnoses with concurrent SARS-CoV-2 positive RT-PCR, 24 patients remained asymptomatic after recovery but had recurrent or persistent RT-PCR, and 19 patients had recurrent COVID-19 symptoms with concurrent SARS-CoV-2 positive RT-PCR but no alternative diagnoses. These 19 patients had symptom recurrence a median of 57 days after initial symptom onset (interquartile range: 47-76). Six of these patients had paired specimens available for further testing, but none had laboratory findings confirming reinfections. Testing of an additional 3 patients with recurrent symptoms and alternative diagnoses also did not confirm reinfection. CONCLUSIONS: We did not confirm SARS-CoV-2 reinfection within 90 days of the initial infection based on the clinical and laboratory characteristics of cases in this investigation. Our findings support current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance around quarantine and testing for patients who have recovered from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Laboratories , Reinfection
13.
Nature ; 602(7896): 307-313, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585832

ABSTRACT

Emerging variants of concern (VOCs) are driving the COVID-19 pandemic1,2. Experimental assessments of replication and transmission of major VOCs and progenitors are needed to understand the mechanisms of replication and transmission of VOCs3. Here we show that the spike protein (S) from Alpha (also known as B.1.1.7) and Beta (B.1.351) VOCs had a greater affinity towards the human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor than that of the progenitor variant S(D614G) in vitro. Progenitor variant virus expressing S(D614G) (wt-S614G) and the Alpha variant showed similar replication kinetics in human nasal airway epithelial cultures, whereas the Beta variant was outcompeted by both. In vivo, competition experiments showed a clear fitness advantage of Alpha over wt-S614G in ferrets and two mouse models-the substitutions in S were major drivers of the fitness advantage. In hamsters, which support high viral replication levels, Alpha and wt-S614G showed similar fitness. By contrast, Beta was outcompeted by Alpha and wt-S614G in hamsters and in mice expressing human ACE2. Our study highlights the importance of using multiple models to characterize fitness of VOCs and demonstrates that Alpha is adapted for replication in the upper respiratory tract and shows enhanced transmission in vivo in restrictive models, whereas Beta does not overcome Alpha or wt-S614G in naive animals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication , Amino Acid Substitution , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Animals, Laboratory/virology , COVID-19/veterinary , Cricetinae , Disease Models, Animal , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Ferrets/virology , Humans , Male , Mesocricetus/virology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virulence/genetics
14.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 23561, 2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559302

ABSTRACT

N-glycosylation plays an important role in the structure and function of membrane and secreted proteins. The spike protein on the surface of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes COVID-19, is heavily glycosylated and the major target for developing vaccines, therapeutic drugs and diagnostic tests. The first major SARS-CoV-2 variant carries a D614G substitution in the spike (S-D614G) that has been associated with altered conformation, enhanced ACE2 binding, and increased infectivity and transmission. In this report, we used mass spectrometry techniques to characterize and compare the N-glycosylation of the wild type (S-614D) or variant (S-614G) SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoproteins prepared under identical conditions. The data showed that half of the N-glycosylation sequons changed their distribution of glycans in the S-614G variant. The S-614G variant showed a decrease in the relative abundance of complex-type glycans (up to 45%) and an increase in oligomannose glycans (up to 33%) on all altered sequons. These changes led to a reduction in the overall complexity of the total N-glycosylation profile. All the glycosylation sites with altered patterns were in the spike head while the glycosylation of three sites in the stalk remained unchanged between S-614G and S-614D proteins.


Subject(s)
Glycopeptides/analysis , Mass Spectrometry/methods , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid , Glycosylation , Humans , Mutation , Protein Binding , Protein Structure, Tertiary , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry
15.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-293462

ABSTRACT

The divergence of SARS-CoV-2 into variants of concern/interest (VOC/VOI) necessitated analysis of their impact on vaccines. Escape from vaccine-induced antibodies by SARS-CoV-2 VOC/VOIs was analyzed to ascertain and rank their risk. The variants showed differential reductions in neutralization and replication titers by the post-vaccination sera with Beta variant showing the most neutralization escape that was mechanistically driven by mutations in both the N-terminal domain and receptor-binding domain of the spike.

16.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 22(1): 73-84, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1452446

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Improved seasonal influenza vaccines for older adults that can induce broadly cross-reactive antibodies and enhanced T-cell responses, particularly against A H3N2 viruses, while avoiding egg-adaptive antigenic changes, are needed. We aimed to show that the Matrix-M-adjuvanted quadrivalent nanoparticle influenza vaccine (qNIV) was immunologically non-inferior to a licensed, standard-dose quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV4) in older adults. METHODS: This was a phase 3 randomised, observer-blinded, active-comparator controlled trial done across 19 US community-based clinical research sites during the 2019-20 influenza season. Participants were clinically stable and community-dwelling, aged at least 65 years, and were randomised in a 1:1 ratio using an interactive web response system to receive a single intramuscular dose of qNIV or IIV4. The primary objective was to describe safety and show that qNIV was immunologically non-inferior to IIV4. The primary outcomes were adverse events by treatment group and comparative haemagglutination-inhibiting antibody responses (assayed with egg-propagated virus) on day 28, summarised in terms of the ratio of geometric mean titres (GMTRqNIV/IIV4) and seroconversion rate (SCR) difference between participants receiving qNIV or IIV4 for all four vaccine homologous influenza strains. The immunogenicity outcome was measured in the per-protocol population. Non-inferiority was shown if the lower bound of the two-sided 95% CI on the GMTRqNIV/IIV4 was at least 0·67 and the lower bound of the two-sided 95% CI on the SCR difference -was at least -10%. The study is registered with clinicaltrials.gov, NCT04120194, and is active and not recruiting. FINDINGS: 2742 adults were assessed for eligibility and 2654 were enrolled and randomised between Oct 14, 2019, and Oct 25, 2019; 1333 participants were randomised to the qNIV group and 1319 to the IIV4 group (two participants withdrew consent before being assigned to a group). qNIV showed immunological non-inferiority to IIV4: GMTRqNIV/IIV4 for the four vaccine homologous influenza strains was A/Brisbane 1·09 (95% CI 1·03 to 1·15), A/Kansas 1·19 (1·11 to 1·27), B/Maryland 1·03 (0·99 to 1·07), and B/Phuket 1·23 (1·16 to 1·29); and SCR difference was A/Brisbane 5·0 (95% CI 1·9 to 8·1), A/Kansas 7·3 (3·6 to 11·1), B/Maryland 0·5 (-1·9 to 2·9), and B/Phuket 8·5 (5·0 to 11·9). 659 (49·4%) of 1333 of participants in the qNIV group and 551 (41·8%) of 1319 participants in the IIV4 group had at least one treatment-emergent adverse event. More solicited adverse events were reported by participants in the qNIV group (551 [41·3%] of 1333) than in the IIV4 group (420 [31·8%] of 1319), and were comprised primarily of mild to moderate transient injection site pain (341 [25·6%] in the qNIV group vs 212 [16·1%] in the IIV4 group). INTERPRETATION: qNIV was well tolerated and produced qualitatively and quantitatively enhanced humoral and cellular immune response in older adults compared with IIV4. qNIV might enhance the effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccination, and future studies to show clinical efficacy are planned. FUNDING: Novavax.


Subject(s)
/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/standards , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Nanoparticles/administration & dosage , Saponins/administration & dosage , Aged , Female , Hemagglutination Inhibition Tests , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Influenza, Human/immunology , Male , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Saponins/chemistry , Seasons
17.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-291717

ABSTRACT

Background: Industrialised countries had varied responses to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and how they adapted to new situations and knowledge since it began. These differences in preparedness and policy may lead to different death tolls from COVID-19 as well as other diseases. Methods: We applied an ensemble of 16 Bayesian probabilistic models to vital statistics data to estimate the impacts of the pandemic on weekly all-cause mortality for 40 industrialised countries from mid-February 2020 through mid-February 2021, before a large segment of the population was vaccinated in these countries. Results: Over the entire year, an estimated 1,410,300 (95% credible interval 1,267,600-1,579,200) more people died in these countries than would have been expected had the pandemic not happened. This is equivalent to 141 (127-158) additional deaths per 100,000 people and a 15% (14-17) increase in deaths in all these countries combined. In Iceland, Australia and New Zealand, mortality was lower than would be expected if the pandemic had not occurred, while South Korea and Norway experienced no detectable change in mortality. In contrast, the USA, Czechia, Slovakia and Poland experienced at least 20% higher mortality. There was substantial heterogeneity across countries in the dynamics of excess mortality. The first wave of the pandemic, from mid-February to the end of May 2020, accounted for over half of excess deaths in Scotland, Spain, England and Wales, Canada, Sweden, Belgium, the Netherlands and Cyprus. At the other extreme, the period between mid-September 2020 and mid-February 2021 accounted for over 90% of excess deaths in Bulgaria, Croatia, Czechia, Hungary, Latvia, Montenegro, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia. Conclusions: Until the great majority of national and global populations have vaccine-acquired immunity, minimising the death toll of the pandemic from COVID-19 and other diseases will require actions to delay and contain infections and continue routine health care.

18.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(6): e1348-e1355, 2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479943

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and antigen tests are important diagnostics for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Sensitivity of antigen tests has been shown to be lower than that of rRT-PCR; however, data to evaluate epidemiologic characteristics that affect test performance are limited. METHODS: Paired mid-turbinate nasal swabs were collected from university students and staff and tested for SARS-CoV-2 using both Quidel Sofia SARS Antigen Fluorescent Immunoassay (FIA) and rRT-PCR assay. Specimens positive by either rRT-PCR or antigen FIA were placed in viral culture and tested for subgenomic RNA (sgRNA). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate characteristics associated with antigen results, rRT-PCR cycle threshold (Ct) values, sgRNA, and viral culture. RESULTS: Antigen FIA sensitivity was 78.9% and 43.8% among symptomatic and asymptomatic participants, respectively. Among rRT-PCR positive participants, negative antigen results were more likely among asymptomatic participants (odds ratio [OR] 4.6, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-15.4) and less likely among participants reporting nasal congestion (OR 0.1, 95% CI: .03-.8). rRT-PCR-positive specimens with higher Ct values (OR 0.5, 95% CI: .4-.8) were less likely, and specimens positive for sgRNA (OR 10.2, 95% CI: 1.6-65.0) more likely, to yield positive virus isolation. Antigen testing was >90% positive in specimens with Ct values < 29. Positive predictive value of antigen test for positive viral culture (57.7%) was similar to that of rRT-PCR (59.3%). CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 antigen test advantages include low cost, wide availability and rapid turnaround time, making them important screening tests. The performance of antigen tests may vary with patient characteristics, so performance characteristics should be accounted for when designing testing strategies and interpreting results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antigens, Viral , Humans , RNA , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Reverse Transcription , Sensitivity and Specificity , Universities
19.
Res Sq ; 2021 Feb 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1417405

ABSTRACT

Recently approved vaccines have already shown remarkable protection in limiting SARS-CoV-2 associated disease. However, immunologic mechanism(s) of protection, as well as how boosting alters immunity to wildtype and newly emerging strains, remain incompletely understood. Here we deeply profiled the humoral immune response in a cohort of non-human primates immunized with a stable recombinant full-length SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) glycoprotein (NVX-CoV2373) at two dose levels, administered as a single or two-dose regimen with a saponin-based adjuvant Matrix-M™. While antigen dose had some effect on Fc-effector profiles, both antigen dose and boosting significantly altered overall titers, neutralization and Fc-effector profiles, driving unique vaccine-induced antibody fingerprints. Combined differences in antibody effector functions and neutralization were strongly associated with distinct levels of protection in the upper and lower respiratory tract, pointing to the presence of combined, but distinct, compartment-specific neutralization and Fc-mechanisms as key determinants of protective immunity against infection. Moreover, NVX-CoV2373 elicited antibodies functionally target emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants, collectively pointing to the critical collaborative role for Fab and Fc in driving maximal protection against SARS-CoV-2. Collectively, the data presented here suggest that a single dose may prevent disease, but that two doses may be essential to block further transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and emerging variants.

20.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 1751-1759, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393119

ABSTRACT

The effectiveness of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines against the Delta variant, which has been associated with greater transmissibility and virulence, remains unclear. We conducted a test-negative case-control study to explore the vaccine effectiveness (VE) in real-world settings. We recruited participants aged 18-59 years who consisted of SARS-CoV-2 test-positive cases (n = 74) and test-negative controls (n = 292) during the outbreak of the Delta variant in May 2021 in Guangzhou city, China. Vaccination status was compared to estimate The VE of SARS-CoV-2 inactivated vaccines. A single dose of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine yielded the VE of only 13.8%. After adjusting for age and sex, the overall VE for two-dose vaccination was 59.0% (95% confidence interval: 16.0% to 81.6%) against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and 70.2% (95% confidence interval: 29.6-89.3%) against moderate COVID-19 and 100% against severe COVID-19 which might be overestimated due to the small sample size. The VE of two-dose vaccination against COVID-19 reached 72.5% among participants aged 40-59 years, and was higher in females than in males against COVID-19 and moderate diseases. While single dose vaccination was not sufficiently protective, the two-dose dosing scheme of the inactivated vaccines was effective against the Delta variant infection in real-world settings, with the estimated efficacy exceeding the World Health Organization minimal threshold of 50%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adolescent , Adult , Age Distribution , COVID-19/classification , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Case-Control Studies , China , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Genetic Variation , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Inactivated/standards , Young Adult
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