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1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323560

ABSTRACT

Background: In December 2019, Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak was reported from Wuhan, China. Information on the clinical course and prognosis of COVID-19 was not thoroughly described. We described the clinical courses and prognosis in COVID-19 patients. Methods Retrospective case series of COVID-19 patients from Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University in Wuhan, and Xi-shui Hospital, Hubei Province, China, up to February 10, 2020. Epidemiological, demographic and clinical data were collected. Clinical course of survivors and non-survivors were compared. Risk factors for death were analyzed. Results A total of 107 discharged patients with COVID-19 were enrolled. The clinical course of COVID-19 presented as a tri-phasic pattern. Week 1 after illness onset was characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, lymphopenia and radiological multilobar pulmonary infiltrates. In severe cases, thrombocytopenia, acute kidney injury, acute myocardial injury or adult respiratory distress syndrome were observed. During week 2, in mild cases, fever, cough and systemic symptoms began to resolve and platelet count rose to normal range, but lymphopenia persisted. In severe cases, leukocytosis, neutrophilia and deteriorating multi-organ dysfunction were dominant. By week 3, mild cases had clinically resolved except for lymphopenia. However, severe cases showed persistent lymphopenia, severe acute respiratory dyspnea syndrome , refractory shock, anuric acute kidney injury, coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia and death. Older age and male sex were independent risk factors for poor outcome of the illness. Conclusions A period of 7–13 days after illness onset is the critical stage in COVID-19 course. Age and male gender were independent risk factors for death of COVID-19.

2.
Shock ; 56(2): 200-205, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316852

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We used lung ultrasonography to identify features of COVID-19 pneumonia and to evaluate the prognostic value. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed lung ultrasonography on 48 COVID-19 patients in an intensive care unit (ICU) (Wuhan, China) using a 12-zone method. The associations between lung ultrasonography score, PaO2/FiO2, APACHE II, SOFA, and PaCO2 with 28-day mortality were analyzed and the receiver operator characteristic curve was plotted. RESULTS: 25.9% areas in all scanning zones presented with B7 lines and 23.5% with B3 lines (B-pattern) on lung ultrasonography; 13% areas with confluent B lines (B-pattern), 24.9% in areas with consolidations, and 9.9% in areas with A lines. Pleural effusion was observed in 2.8% of areas. Lung ultrasonography score was negatively correlated with PaO2/FiO2 (n = 48, r = -0.498, P < 0.05) and positively correlated with APACHE II (n = 48, r = 0.435, P < 0.05). Lung ultrasonography score was independently associated with 28-day mortality. The areas under receiver operator characteristic curves of lung ultrasonography score were 0.735 (95% CI: 0.586-0.844). The sensitivity, specificity, and cutoff values were 0.833, 0.722, and 22.5, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Lung ultrasonography could be used to assess the severity of COVID-19 pneumonia, and it could also reveal the pathological signs of the disease. The lung ultrasonography score on ICU admission was independently related to the ICU 28-day mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Ultrasonography/methods , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Ear Nose Throat J ; 100(2_suppl): 140S-147S, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-913945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: An outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection occurred in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. To date, the analysis of fatal cases and the risk factors for death have rarely been reported. METHODS: In this study, 220 adult patients with confirmed and suspected COVID-19 were enrolled. Clinical characteristics, laboratory data, treatments, and complications were compared between 168 survivors and 52 nonsurvivors. Univariable analysis and multivariable logistic regression were used to investigate the risk factors for mortality. RESULTS: A total of 220 patients (168 were discharged and 52 died in the hospital) were enrolled in the study. The median age of all patients was 59.5 (47.0-69.0) years, and the median age of patients who died was significantly older than that of patients who survived (70.5 vs 56.0 years, respectively; P < .001). According to multivariate logistic regression, older age (odds ratio: 1.09, 95% CI: 1.03-1.15; P = .001), initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score >2 (37.4, 9.4-148.0; P = .011), and respiratory rate >24 per minute (10.89, 1.47-80.67; P = .019) were independent risk factors for mortality. CONCLUSION: Clinical and laboratory parameters predicting poor prognosis including older age, baseline SOFA score >2, and respiratory rate >24 per minute were identified.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Respiratory Rate , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/etiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/physiopathology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Case-Control Studies , China , Comorbidity , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Liver Diseases/etiology , Liver Diseases/physiopathology , Liver Diseases/therapy , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/etiology , Sepsis/physiopathology , Sepsis/therapy
4.
Shock ; 54(5): 644-651, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-867936

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) outbreak has spread around the world. However, the dynamic course of critically ill COVID-19 has not been described thoroughly. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 195 critically ill COVID-19 patients in Hubei province, China, between January 5, 2020 and April 3, 2020. Epidemiologic data, clinical features, treatments, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: Most critically ill patients were older with higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores. After critical illness onset, a total of 181 (92.8%) patients received ventilation support, of which 84 (43.1%) received noninvasive and 97 (49.7%) received invasive mechanic ventilation (IMV). Among the 97 patients with IMV, 28 (28.9%) received prone ventilation, 57 (58.8%) received neuromuscular blocked therapy, and 22 (11.3%) received tracheostomy due to prolonged ventilator use. Early hypoxemia, subsequent hypercapnia, pulmonary hypertension, and finally pulmonary fibrosis were notable in the clinical course of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Eighty-nine (45.6%) patients presented with shock. Acute kidney injury (29.7%) and secondary infection (28.2%) were also notable. The overall mortality of critically ill patients at day 28 was 42.1%. Intensive care unit (ICU) mortality was around 33%, as 16 patients died prior to ICU admission. A low PaO2/FiO2 ratio was an independent risk factor for death. High viral load was observed in most non-survivors. CONCLUSION: ARDS and shock were notable in the critical illness of COVID-19. Ventilation support and hemodynamic support were the cornerstones for critical care. High viral load was associated with death of critically ill COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hemodynamics/drug effects , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiration, Artificial , Aged , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Agents/adverse effects , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Disease Progression , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Viral Load
5.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-777

ABSTRACT

Background: Since the end of 2019, coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) outbreak spreads around the world. We aimed to share the details of critically ill patien

6.
Crit Care ; 24(1): 188, 2020 04 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-144064

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In December 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak was reported from Wuhan, China. Information on the clinical course and prognosis of COVID-19 was not thoroughly described. We described the clinical courses and prognosis in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Retrospective case series of COVID-19 patients from Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University in Wuhan and Xishui Hospital, Hubei Province, China, up to February 10, 2020. Epidemiological, demographic, and clinical data were collected. The clinical course of survivors and non-survivors were compared. Risk factors for death were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 107 discharged patients with COVID-19 were enrolled. The clinical course of COVID-19 presented as a tri-phasic pattern. Week 1 after illness onset was characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, lymphopenia, and radiological multi-lobar pulmonary infiltrates. In severe cases, thrombocytopenia, acute kidney injury, acute myocardial injury, and adult respiratory distress syndrome were observed. During week 2, in mild cases, fever, cough, and systemic symptoms began to resolve and platelet count rose to normal range, but lymphopenia persisted. In severe cases, leukocytosis, neutrophilia, and deteriorating multi-organ dysfunction were dominant. By week 3, mild cases had clinically resolved except for lymphopenia. However, severe cases showed persistent lymphopenia, severe acute respiratory dyspnea syndrome, refractory shock, anuric acute kidney injury, coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia, and death. Older age and male sex were independent risk factors for poor outcome of the illness. CONCLUSIONS: A period of 7-13 days after illness onset is the critical stage in the COVID-19 course. Age and male gender were independent risk factors for death of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China , Cough/virology , Female , Fever/virology , Heart/virology , Humans , Lymphopenia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Prognosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Thrombocytopenia/virology , Young Adult
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