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1.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; : 1-7, 2022 Apr 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806177

ABSTRACT

Mass vaccination is critical to control the pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Fear of adverse events (AEs) after COVID-19 vaccination is a main factor associated with vaccination hesitancy. We aimed to analyze AEs in healthcare workers (HCWs) vaccinated with COVID-19 vaccines (Aikewei or CoronaVac) composed of inactivated virus. We used a structured self-administered questionnaire to conduct two surveys on COVID-19 vaccination among HCWs in perinatal medicine and obstetrics/gynecology from April 5 to April 21, 2021. In total, 1392 HCWs who had received at least one vaccine dose were included. Of them, 1264 (90.8%) were females and 1047 (75.2%) received two doses. The overall incidence of any AEs after the first and second dose was 38.2% (532/1392) and 31.0% (325/1047) respectively (χ2 = 13.506, P = .0002). Female and HCWs aged 18-30 y were more likely to report AEs. The most common AEs were local reaction, accounting for 48.1% and 67.4% of all AEs after the first and second dose respectively. The systemic AEs were mainly neurological (9.8% and 4.8% after the first and second injection respectively) and flu-like symptoms (6.3% and 3.2%). Overall, most of AEs were mild, only 5.1% (after the first dose) and 2.8% (after the second dose) of individuals with AEs received symptomatic treatment or sick leaves, and none of them required hospitalization. Our data added more evidence that inactivated COVID-19 vaccines are highly safe. The data are valuable to overcome vaccine hesitancy associated with concerns about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines.

2.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-332109

ABSTRACT

This study examines if people smoke more under Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) closure policies when trapped at home with their families. In such circumstances, the pleasure from smoking may be more tempting than usual. At the same time, smokers’ families are more likely to be victims of passive smoking. This study uses temporal and regional variations in policies strength with data from the Oxford COVID-19 Government Response Tracker project (OxCGRT) for to examine the impact of COVID-19 closure policies on smoking behaviors. With longitudinal data from the China Family Panel Studies (CFPS) 2018 and 2020, we find diminished smoking behaviors of Chinese male adults when the government implements strict public health policies for the COVID-19 pandemic. people with more conscientiousness personality traits and pro-family attitudes tend to smoke less when policy stringency increases.

3.
Front Public Health ; 10: 848122, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776063

ABSTRACT

Background: Early childhood fall is a pressing global public health problem and one of the leading causes of child injury. China has a high proportion of children and a high burden of illness from falls. Therefore, educational interventions to prevent childhood fall would be beneficial. Methods: We used the outcome of knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire, which was conducted by Pudong New District of Shanghai Municipal Government, to summarize demographic and baseline characteristics grouped by intervention or not, and analyzed descriptive statistics of continuous and categorical variables. A logistic stepwise function model was established to study the influence of different covariables on the degree of injury, and AIC/BIC/AICC was used to select the optimal model. Finally, we carried out single-factor analysis and established a multifactor model by the stepwise function method. Results: Attitude and actual behavior scores had significant differences. The intervention and control groups had 20.79 ± 3.20 and 20.39 ± 2.89 attitude scores, respectively. Compared to the control group (5.97 ± 1.32), the intervention group had higher actual behavior scores (5.75 ± 1.50). In the univariate analysis results, fathers' education level, mothers' education level, actual behavior and what cares for children had a significant influence on whether children got injured. In multivariate analysis, attitude had a positive influence on whether injured [odds ratio: 1.13 (1.05-1.21), P < 0.001]. Conclusion: Educational intervention for children and their guardians can effectively reduce the risk of childhood falls, and changes in behavior and attitude are the result of educational influence. Education of childhood fall prevention can be used as a public health intervention to improve children's health.


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Accidental Falls/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
iScience ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1755857

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic of COVID-19 caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection confers great threat to the public health. Human breastmilk is a complex with nutritional composition to nourish infants and protect them from different kinds of infectious diseases including COVID-19. Here, we identified lactoferrin (LF), mucin1 (MUC1) and α-lactalbumin (α-LA) from human breastmilk inhibit SARS-CoV-2 infection using a SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus system and transcription and replication-competent SARS-CoV-2 virus-like-particles (trVLP). Additionally, LF and MUC1 inhibited multiple steps including viral attachment, entry and post-entry replication, while α-LA inhibited viral attachment and entry. Importantly, LF, MUC1 and α-LA possessed potent antiviral activities towards variants such as B.1.1.7 (alpha), B.1.351 (beta), P.1 (gamma) and B.1.617.1 (kappa). Taken together, our study provides evidence that human breastmilk components (LF, MUC1 and α-LA) are promising antiviral and potential therapeutic candidates warranting further development or treating COVID-19. Graphical

6.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325394

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread around the world. This retrospective study aims to analyze the clinical features of COVID-19 patients with cancer and identify death outcome related risk factors. Methods: : From February 10th to April 15th, 2020, 103 COVID-19 patients with cancer were enrolled. Difference analyses were performed between severe and non-severe patients. A propensity score matching analysis, including 103 COVID-19 patients with cancer and 206 matched non-cancer COVID-19 patients were performed. Next, we identified death related risk factors and developed a nomogram for predicting the probability. Results: : In 103 COVID-19 patients with cancer, the main cancer categories were breast cancer, lung cancer and bladder cancer. Compared to non-severe patients, severe patients had a higher median age, and a higher proportion of smokers, diabetes, heart disease and dyspnea. In addition, most of the laboratory results between two groups were significant different. PSM analysis found that the proportion of dyspnea was much higher in COVID-19 patients with cancer. The severity incidence in two groups were similar, while a much higher mortality was found in COVID-19 patients with cancer compared to that in COVID-19 patients without cancer (11.7% vs. 4.4%, P = 0.028). Furthermore, we found that neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were related to death outcome. And a nomogram based on the factors was developed. Conclusion: In COVID-19 patients with cancer, the clinical features and laboratory results between severe group and non-severe group were significant different. NLR and CRP were the risk factors that could predict death outcome.

7.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-324495

ABSTRACT

Background: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) spreads rapidly among people and causes a global pandemic. It is of great clinical significance to identify COVID-19 patients with high risk of death. Results: Of the 2,169 COVID-19 patients, the median age was 61 years and male patients accounted for 48%. A total of 646 patients were diagnosed with severe illness, and 75 patients died. Obvious differences in demographics, clinical characteristics and laboratory examinations were found between survivors and non-survivors. A decision tree classifier, including three biomarkers, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, C-reactive protein and lactic dehydrogenase, was developed to predict death outcome in severe patients. This model performed well both in train dataset and test dataset. The accuracy of this model was 0.98 and 0.98, respectively. Conclusion: The machine learning model was robust and effective in predicting the death outcome in severe COVID-19 patients.

8.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-324269

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of adjunctive corticosteroid therapy in patients with severe COVID-19. Methods: : We conducted a retrospective analysis of the difference in several outcomes between patients with severe COVID-19 who received corticosteroid therapy (the corticosteroid group) and patients with severe COVID-19 who did not receive corticosteroid therapy (the non-corticosteroid group). Results: : Seventy-five patients were included in this study. Of these, 47 patients were in the corticosteroid group and 28 patients were in the non-corticosteroid group. There were no differences between the two groups in the total length of hospital stay (LOS), the length of ICU stay, high-flow oxygen days, non-invasive ventilator days, invasive ventilation days, and mortality rate. Total lesion volume ratio, consolidation volume ratio and GGO volume ratio in the corticosteroid group decreased significantly on day 14, while those in the non-corticosteroid group did not show a significant decrease. Conclusions: : Our results show that adjunctive corticosteroid use did not significantly improve clinical outcomes in severe COVID-19 patients, but might promote the absorption of pulmonary lesions. Larger multicenter randomized controlled studies may be needed to confirm this.

10.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315249

ABSTRACT

Aim: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused an unprecedented healthcare crisis. We aim to develop and validate a nomogram for predicting disease progression based on a large cohort of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Methods: This is a multicenter retrospective cohort study, with a total of 4,086 hospitalized COVID-19 patients enrolled from two hospitals in Wuhan, China between February 3 rd and Apr 10 th . Nomogram was developed based on a cohort of 3, 022 patients from one hospital, and externally validated in another cohort of 1,064 patients from the other hospital. The calibration was assessed by a calibration plot and the HL test to evaluate the goodness of fit, and the Area under the ROC Curve (AUROC) as a measure of discriminative ability. Results: Six independent predictors, including age, dyspnea, platelet count, lactate dehydrogenase, D-dimer and cardiovascular disease, were finally identified for construction of the nomogram for predicting disease progression of COVID-19 patients during hospitalization. The AUROC was 0.877 and 0.817 for development cohort and validation cohort, respectively. The calibration plots AND Hosmer-Lemeshow test showed optimal agreement between nomogram prediction and actual observation. The decision curve analysis showed the performance of the nomograms were better than all univariable models, and had greater net benefit. Next, a predictive nomogram for disease severity on admission was formulated and the six independent factors used were similar to that of the nomogram for disease progression, which indicates that those factors play important roles in determining disease severity and the risk of disease progression. Conclusion: In the current study, a nomogram was developed based on generally readily available variables at hospital admission to help predict disease progression of COVID-19.

11.
PLoS Med ; 19(2): e1003928, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686091

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Digital network-based methods may enhance peer distribution of HIV self-testing (HIVST) kits, but interventions that can optimize this approach are needed. We aimed to assess whether monetary incentives and peer referral could improve a secondary distribution program for HIVST among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Between October 21, 2019 and September 14, 2020, a 3-arm randomized controlled, single-blinded trial was conducted online among 309 individuals (defined as index participants) who were assigned male at birth, aged 18 years or older, ever had male-to-male sex, willing to order HIVST kits online, and consented to take surveys online. We randomly assigned index participants into one of the 3 arms: (1) standard secondary distribution (control) group (n = 102); (2) secondary distribution with monetary incentives (SD-M) group (n = 103); and (3) secondary distribution with monetary incentives plus peer referral (SD-M-PR) group (n = 104). Index participants in 3 groups were encouraged to order HIVST kits online and distribute to members within their social networks. Members who received kits directly from index participants or through peer referral links from index MSM were defined as alters. Index participants in the 2 intervention groups could receive a fixed incentive ($3 USD) online for the verified test result uploaded to the digital platform by each unique alter. Index participants in the SD-M-PR group could additionally have a personalized peer referral link for alters to order kits online. Both index participants and alters needed to pay a refundable deposit ($15 USD) for ordering a kit. All index participants were assigned an online 3-month follow-up survey after ordering kits. The primary outcomes were the mean number of alters motivated by index participants in each arm and the mean number of newly tested alters motivated by index participants in each arm. These were assessed using zero-inflated negative binomial regression to determine the group differences in the mean number of alters and the mean number of newly tested alters motivated by index participants. Analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis. We also conducted an economic evaluation using microcosting from a health provider perspective with a 3-month time horizon. The mean number of unique tested alters motivated by index participants was 0.57 ± 0.96 (mean ± standard deviation [SD]) in the control group, compared with 0.98 ± 1.38 in the SD-M group (mean difference [MD] = 0.41),and 1.78 ± 2.05 in the SD-M-PR group (MD = 1.21). The mean number of newly tested alters motivated by index participants was 0.16 ± 0.39 (mean ± SD) in the control group, compared with 0.41 ± 0.73 in the SD-M group (MD = 0.25) and 0.57 ± 0.91 in the SD-M-PR group (MD = 0.41), respectively. Results indicated that index participants in intervention arms were more likely to motivate unique tested alters (control versus SD-M: incidence rate ratio [IRR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.82 to 4.89, p-value < 0.001; control versus SD-M-PR: IRR = 3.26, 95% CI = 2.29 to 4.63, p-value < 0.001) and newly tested alters (control versus SD-M: IRR = 4.22, 95% CI = 1.93 to 9.23, p-value < 0.001; control versus SD-M-PR: IRR = 3.49, 95% CI = 1.92 to 6.37, p-value < 0.001) to conduct HIVST. The proportion of newly tested testers among alters was 28% in the control group, 42% in the SD-M group, and 32% in the SD-M-PR group. A total of 18 testers (3 index participants and 15 alters) tested as HIV positive, and the HIV reactive rates for alters were similar between the 3 groups. The total costs were $19,485.97 for 794 testers, including 450 index participants and 344 alter testers. Overall, the average cost per tester was $24.54, and the average cost per alter tester was $56.65. Monetary incentives alone (SD-M group) were more cost-effective than monetary incentives with peer referral (SD-M-PR group) on average in terms of alters tested and newly tested alters, despite SD-M-PR having larger effects. Compared to the control group, the cost for one more alter tester in the SD-M group was $14.90 and $16.61 in the SD-M-PR group. For newly tested alters, the cost of one more alter in the SD-M group was $24.65 and $49.07 in the SD-M-PR group. No study-related adverse events were reported during the study. Limitations include the digital network approach might neglect individuals who lack internet access. CONCLUSIONS: Monetary incentives alone and the combined intervention of monetary incentives and peer referral can promote the secondary distribution of HIVST among MSM. Monetary incentives can also expand HIV testing by encouraging first-time testing through secondary distribution by MSM. This social network-based digital approach can be expanded to other public health research, especially in the era of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). TRIAL REGISTRATION: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (ChiCTR) ChiCTR1900025433.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Testing/instrumentation , Homosexuality, Male , Reimbursement, Incentive , Self-Testing , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Adult , China , Costs and Cost Analysis , HIV Testing/economics , HIV Testing/methods , Humans , Male
13.
Int J Health Plann Manage ; 37(3): 1205-1220, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1640712

ABSTRACT

Eight versions of the Protocol on Prevention and Control of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) (the Protocol) were issued successively by the Chinese authority to guide the local responses since the first COVID-19 case appeared in Wuhan, China. This study aimed to investigate the evolution of the overall strategy and specific measures in these Protocols, and several recommendations were provided after analysing China's response to the epidemic resurgence. As a result, we found a gradual expanding trend in case surveillance, early screening, and epidemiological investigation, as well as a progressively rigorous tendency in isolation measures and close contact management. With the Protocol's guidance, China had achieved success in several recent fights against domestic COVID-19 resurgences. The city lockdown and multiple city-wide nucleic acid tests adopted were deemed necessary in COVID-19 resurgence's battle. Besides, the large-scale distance centralised quarantine, which is, quarantine in a purpose-built isolation station away from communities where people under quarantine lived, was promoted in rural areas. China's anti-epidemic achievements provide ideas for the global battle against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Epidemics/prevention & control , Humans , Quarantine
14.
Front Public Health ; 9: 752965, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595569

ABSTRACT

Background: Solidarity, such as community connectedness and social cohesion, may be useful in improving HIV testing uptake among men who have sex with men (MSM). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of solidarity on HIV testing before the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and HIV testing willingness during COVID-19 among MSM in China. Materials and Methods: An online survey was conducted to collect sociodemographic, sexual behavioral, and solidarity items' information from the participants. We first used factor analysis to reveal the principal component of the solidarity items and then used logistic regression to study the impact of solidarity on HIV testing, by adjusting the possible confounding factors, such as age and education. Results: Social cohesion and community connectedness were revealed by the factor analysis. MSM with high community connectedness were more willing to undergo HIV testing before the epidemic adjusted by age [odds ratio (OR): 1.07, 95% CI: 1.01-1.13]. The community connectedness was also related to the willingness of HIV testing during the epidemic, with adjustments of 1.09 (95% CI: 1.03-1.15). People who did not test for HIV before the COVID-19 epidemic were more willing to have the HIV test during the epidemic, which was correlated with the community connectedness, and the OR value was 1.14 (95%: 1.03-1.25). Conclusion: A high level of community connectedness helped to increase the HIV testing rate before COVID-19 and the willingness of HIV testing during the epidemic among MSM. Strategies can strengthen the role of the community in the management and service of MSM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Testing , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
15.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-294514

ABSTRACT

Summary Monoclonal antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 are a clinically validated therapeutic option against COVID-19. As rapidly emerging virus mutants are becoming the next major concern in the fight against the global pandemic, it is imperative that these therapeutic treatments provide coverage against circulating variants and do not contribute to development of treatment emergent resistance. To this end, we investigated the sequence diversity of the spike protein and monitored emergence of minor virus variants in SARS-COV-2 isolates found in COVID-19 patients or identified from preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies. This study demonstrates that a combination of non-competing antibodies, REGEN-COV, not only provides full coverage against current variants of concern/interest but also protects against emergence of new such variants and their potential seeding into the population in a clinical setting.

16.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(12): 4946-4953, 2021 12 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528107

ABSTRACT

Before the availability of COVID-19 vaccines, surveys showed that vaccine hesitancy may influence the acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to investigate COVID-19 vaccination coverage among healthcare workers (HCWs) in obstetrics and gynecology, during the first three-month period of the vaccination campaign after COVID-19 vaccines were approved. A total of 662 eligible HCWs, consisting of 250 HCWs (group one) who participated in a Jiangsu provincial symposium and 412 HCWs (group two) in the department of obstetrics and gynecology, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, were invited to answer a 23-question questionnaire. In total, 618 (93.4%) HCWs completed the questionnaire. The vaccine acceptance in group one was higher than that in group two (87.2% [197/226] vs 74.2% [291/392], χ2 = 14.436, P < .001). Overall, 488 (79.0%) HCWs received COVID-19 vaccination and 130 (21.0%) declined vaccination. One-third of the 488 vaccinees were not vaccinated until consulted with others or requested by employers. Adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that the decline of vaccination was associated with worry about the safety of the vaccine (OR 1.920, CI 95% 1.196-3.082; P = .007). The main reason for the decline of COVID-19 vaccination included the concern about vaccine safety, pregnancy preparation, pregnancy, or lactation. These results indicate that more safety data about COVID-19 vaccines, particularly in pregnant or lactating women, are required to promote the acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination. In addition, vaccination requests or mandates by employers may increase the acceptance of COVID-19 vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Obstetrics , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Immunization Programs , Lactation , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Vaccination Coverage
17.
Int J Ment Health Addict ; : 1-11, 2021 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1465898

ABSTRACT

We noticed an unusual increase of aged adults in first-episode schizophrenia in January and February 2020 since the outbreak of COVID-19. This retrospective study aims to statistically validate this observation and find potential risk factors, if applicable. The demographics of schizophrenia in outpatients (both first-episode and follow-up) from January to March 2020 (36,624 records) and similar periods of 2017-2019 (114,141 records) were analyzed and compared to minimize seasonal influence. Limited personal information (age, gender, approximate residence) was investigated to find risk factors. After considering seasonal factors such as the Spring festival, the age of the first-episode schizophrenia was significantly increased in January (46.60 ± 15.14) and February (51.53 ± 14.74) but went back to normal in March 2020 (38.89 ± 14.59), compared with similar periods from 2017 to 2019 (Jan., 40.77 ± 15.26; Feb., 39.69 ± 15.10; Mar., 42.04 ± 15.83). Meanwhile, a slight but not significant change was found in the distribution of gender and approximate residence (urban/suburb). Our data supported that risk of first-episode schizophrenia in aged adults increased during the COVID-19 outbreak, which is consistent with the fact that COVID-19 is more lethal to elders. Public healthcare should prepare in advance for potential risks in public mental health, especially for elders.

18.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 683431, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463482

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of COVID-19 attracted the attention of the whole world. Our study aimed to explore the predictors for the survival of patients with COVID-19 by machine learning. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis and used the idea of machine learning to train the data of COVID-19 patients in Leishenshan Hospital through the logical regression algorithm provided by scikit-learn. Results: Of 2010 patients, 42 deaths were recorded until March 29, 2020. The mortality rate was 2.09%. There were 6,812 records after data features combination and data arrangement, 3,025 records with high-quality after deleting incomplete data by manual checking, and 5,738 records after data balancing finally by the method of Borderline-1 Smote. The results of 10 times of data training by logistic regression model showed that albumin, saturation of pulse oxygen at admission, alanine aminotransferase, and percentage of neutrophils were possibly associated with the survival of patients. The results of 10 times of data training including age, sex, and height beyond the laboratory measurements showed that percentage of neutrophils, saturation of pulse oxygen at admission, alanine aminotransferase, sex, and albumin were possibly associated with the survival of patients. The rates of precision, recall, and f1-score of the two training models were all higher than 0.9 and relatively stable. Conclusions: We demonstrated that percentage of neutrophils, saturation of pulse oxygen at admission, alanine aminotransferase, sex, and albumin were possibly associated with the survival of patients with COVID-19.

19.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(9): e2127403, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441917

ABSTRACT

Importance: The long-term health outcomes and symptom burden of COVID-19 remain largely unclear. Objective: To evaluate health outcomes of COVID-19 survivors 1 year after hospital discharge and to identify associated risk factors. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective, multicenter cohort study was conducted at 2 designated hospitals, Huoshenshan Hospital and Taikang Tongji Hospital, both in Wuhan, China. All adult patients with COVID-19 discharged between February 12 and April 10, 2020, were screened for eligibility. Of a consecutive sample of 3988 discharged patients, 1555 were excluded (796 declined to participate and 759 were unable to be contacted) and the remaining 2433 patients were enrolled. All patients were interviewed via telephone from March 1 to March 20, 2021. Statistical analysis was performed from March 28 to April 18, 2021. Exposures: COVID-19. Main Outcomes and Measures: All patients participated in telephone interviews using a series of questionnaires for evaluation of symptoms, along with a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) assessment test (CAT). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate risk factors for fatigue, dyspnea, symptom burden, or higher CAT scores. Results: Of 2433 patients at 1-year follow-up, 1205 (49.5%) were men and 680 (27.9%) were categorized into the severe disease group as defined by the World Health Organization guideline; the median (IQR) age was 60.0 (49.0-68.0) years. In total, 1095 patients (45.0%) reported at least 1 symptom. The most common symptoms included fatigue, sweating, chest tightness, anxiety, and myalgia. Older age (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.02; P < .001), female sex (OR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.06-1.52; P = .008), and severe disease during hospital stay (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.18-1.74; P < .001) were associated with higher risks of fatigue. Older age (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.03; P < .001) and severe disease (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.14-1.99; P = .004) were associated with higher risks of having at least 3 symptoms. The median (IQR) CAT score was 2 (0-4), and a total of 161 patients (6.6%) had a CAT score of at least 10. Severe disease (OR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.31-2.58; P < .001) and coexisting cerebrovascular diseases (OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.07-3.54; P = .03) were independent risk factors for CAT scores of at least 10. Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that patients with COVID-19 with severe disease during hospitalization had more postinfection symptoms and higher CAT scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospitals , Patient Discharge , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/etiology , Severity of Illness Index , Survivors , Aged , Anxiety/etiology , China , Cities , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 760, 2021 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403220

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread around the world. This retrospective study aims to analyze the clinical features of COVID-19 patients with cancer and identify death outcome related risk factors. METHODS: From February 10th to April 15th, 2020, 103 COVID-19 patients with cancer were enrolled. Difference analyses were performed between severe and non-severe patients. A propensity score matching (PSM) analysis was performed, including 103 COVID-19 patients with cancer and 206 matched non-cancer COVID-19 patients. Next, we identified death related risk factors and developed a nomogram for predicting the probability. RESULTS: In 103 COVID-19 patients with cancer, the main cancer categories were breast cancer, lung cancer and bladder cancer. Compared to non-severe patients, severe patients had a higher median age, and a higher proportion of smokers, diabetes, heart disease and dyspnea. In addition, most of the laboratory results between two groups were significantly different. PSM analysis found that the proportion of dyspnea was much higher in COVID-19 patients with cancer. The severity incidence in two groups were similar, while a much higher mortality was found in COVID-19 patients with cancer compared to that in COVID-19 patients without cancer (11.7% vs. 4.4%, P = 0.028). Furthermore, we found that neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were related to death outcome. And a nomogram based on the factors was developed. CONCLUSION: In COVID-19 patients with cancer, the clinical features and laboratory results between severe group and non-severe group were significantly different. NLR and CRP were the risk factors that could predict death outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Lymphocytes/cytology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/mortality , Neutrophils/cytology , Nomograms , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Young Adult
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