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1.
International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management ; 35(4):1539-1561, 2023.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2320900

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Based on text content analysis using big data, this study aims to explore differences in guest perceptions of peer-to-peer accommodations before and after COVID-19 to provide suggestions for the development of these properties in China postpandemic. Design/methodology/approach: A guest perception dictionary was established by collecting Ctrip customer reviews of peer-to-peer accommodations. After data cleaning, thematic word analysis and semantic association network analysis were used to explore perceptions and thematic differences before and after COVID-19. Findings: This research constructed a multidimensional framework of guest-perceived values for peer-to-peer accommodation in the context of COVID-19. The findings showed that the emphasis on functionality in peer-to-peer accommodation changed;perceived emotional values associated with peer-to-peer stays were more complex;perceived social values decreased, host-guest interactions were reduced and online communication became a stronger trend;tourist preferences for types of experiences changed, and people changed their destination selections;perceived conditional value was reflected in perceived risks, and the perceptions of environmental health, service and physical risks increased. Research limitations/implications: This research has constructed a multidimensional framework of tourist perceived value on the basis of peer-to-peer accommodation context and epidemic background and has thus shown the changes in tourist perceived value of peer-to-peer accommodation before and after COVID-19. Originality/value: To the best of authors' knowledge, this research constitutes the first attempt to explore the perceptual differences for peer-to-peer accommodations before and after COVID-19 based on an extensive data set of online reviews from multiple provinces of China.

2.
International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management ; 35(4):1539-1561, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2306568

ABSTRACT

PurposeBased on text content analysis using big data, this study aims to explore differences in guest perceptions of peer-to-peer accommodations before and after COVID-19 to provide suggestions for the development of these properties in China postpandemic.Design/methodology/approachA guest perception dictionary was established by collecting Ctrip customer reviews of peer-to-peer accommodations. After data cleaning, thematic word analysis and semantic association network analysis were used to explore perceptions and thematic differences before and after COVID-19.FindingsThis research constructed a multidimensional framework of guest-perceived values for peer-to-peer accommodation in the context of COVID-19. The findings showed that the emphasis on functionality in peer-to-peer accommodation changed;perceived emotional values associated with peer-to-peer stays were more complex;perceived social values decreased, host–guest interactions were reduced and online communication became a stronger trend;tourist preferences for types of experiences changed, and people changed their destination selections;perceived conditional value was reflected in perceived risks, and the perceptions of environmental health, service and physical risks increased.Research limitations/implicationsThis research has constructed a multidimensional framework of tourist perceived value on the basis of peer-to-peer accommodation context and epidemic background and has thus shown the changes in tourist perceived value of peer-to-peer accommodation before and after COVID-19.Originality/valueTo the best of authors' knowledge, this research constitutes the first attempt to explore the perceptual differences for peer-to-peer accommodations before and after COVID-19 based on an extensive data set of online reviews from multiple provinces of China.

3.
Geriatr Nurs ; 42(6): 1303-1308, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437467

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: While traditional "non-medical" prevention and control measures have achieved remarkable results during the COVID-19 pandemic, they have generated difficult situations for older adult patients with chronic disease. The purpose of this study was to understand and identify the COVID-19 risk perception process and trajectory among older adults with chronic disease living in the community. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a qualitative research study that used in-depth semi-structured interviews to explore the experiences of 21 older adult patients with chronic disease. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis methods. RESULTS: Three themes emerged: restricted travel, psychological shock and panic, and unintended consequences. CONCLUSIONS: The perceptions of epidemic risk among older adult patients with chronic disease living in the community had varying characteristics at different stages. Correct identification of risk perception processes and trajectories will assist in formulating more scientific emergency measures in the event of future public health emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Chronic Disease , Humans , Pandemics , Perception , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
4.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 6(3): e18939, 2020 09 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-619832

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in China was first reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) on December 31, 2019, and the first cases were officially identified around December 8, 2019. Although the origin of COVID-19 has not been confirmed, approximately half of the early cases were linked to a seafood market in Wuhan. However, the first two documented patients did not visit the seafood market. News reports, social media, and informal sources may provide information about outbreaks prior to formal notification. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify early signals of pneumonia or severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) in China prior to official recognition of the COVID-19 outbreak in December 2019 using open-source data. METHODS: To capture early reports, we searched an open source epidemic observatory, EpiWatch, for SARI or pneumonia-related illnesses in China from October 1, 2019. The searches were conducted using Google and the Chinese search engine Baidu. RESULTS: There was an increase in reports following the official notification of COVID-19 to the WHO on December 31, 2019, and a report that appeared on December 26, 2019 was retracted. A report of severe pneumonia on November 22, 2019, in Xiangyang was identified, and a potential index patient was retrospectively identified on November 17. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of reports of SARI outbreaks prior to December 31, 2019, with a retracted report on December 26, suggests media censorship, given that formal reports indicate that cases began appearing on December 8. However, the findings also support a relatively recent origin of COVID-19 in November 2019. The case reported on November 22 was transferred to Wuhan approximately one incubation period before the first identified cases on December 8; this case should be further investigated, as only half of the early cases were exposed to the seafood market in Wuhan. Another case of COVID-19 has since been retrospectively identified in Hubei on November 17, 2019, suggesting that the infection was present prior to December.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disclosure , Documentation , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/diagnosis , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology
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