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1.
BMJ Open ; 11(8), 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1843224

ABSTRACT

ObjectivesTo determine the association of general practitioner (GP) contact with depressive symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown in China.DesignIn April 2020, a follow-up survey was conducted on the basis of a baseline survey conducted between October 2018 and May 2019.SettingThe survey was embedded in the Stanford Wellness Living Laboratory-China (WELL China) study, an ongoing prospective community-based cohort study during 2018–2019.ParticipantsThe survey was conducted by telephone interview among 4144 adult urban residents participating in the WELL China study at baseline. We collected information on sociodemographic characteristics, depressive symptoms and GP contact during the lockdown period (February to March 2020).Primary and secondary outcome measuresDepressive symptoms were measured using the WHO-Five Well-being Index, comprising five questionnaire items that briefly indicate psychological well-being. Logistic regression models were applied to assess the association between GP contact and depressive symptoms.ResultsIn total, 3356 participants responded to the survey;203 were excluded owing to missing data on depressive symptoms, leaving 3153 participants in the present study. During lockdown, 449 participants had GP contact. GP contact was significantly negatively associated with prevalent depressive symptoms (OR, 0.67;95% CI 0.51 to 0.89;p<0.01) and incident depressive symptoms (OR 0.68;95% CI 0.51 to 0.93;p<0.05). Stratified analysis showed a significant negative association between depressive symptoms and GP contact in individuals who were 45–64 years old (p<0.01), had a middle or high education (p<0.01) and had self-reported non-communicable diseases (p<0.05).ConclusionsContact with GPs during the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdowns may have a negative association with depressive symptoms in community-dwelling populations. Given the possibility of further surges in COVID-19 infections, GPs’ contact in the community should be enhanced.

2.
Zhejiang Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 50(6): 741-747, 2021 Dec 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753706

ABSTRACT

: To explore the association between napping status and depressive symptoms in urban residents during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic. : The survey was embedded in the Wellness Living Laboratory-China (WELL China) cohort study. Health and lifestyle information during the COVID-19 epidemic were obtained via the telephone interview from April 8, 2020 to May 29, 2020. A total of 3075 residents aged 18 to from Gongshu district of Hangzhou city with complete data were included in the analyses. The World Health Organization-Five Well-being Index (WHO-5) was used to measure depressive symptoms. Multiple logistic regression model was used to assess the association between napping status and depressive symptoms in the participants. : The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 20.6% in the participants during the epidemic. Daytime napping behavior, especially napping time ≤30 min, was associated with a lower risk of prevalent depressive symptoms (=0.61, 95%: 0.47-0.79, <0.01) and incident depressive symptoms in the population (=0.66, 95%: 0.50-0.88, <0.01). Among those with depressive symptoms at baseline, napping time ≤ was beneficial for the outcome of depressive symptoms (=0.42, 95%: 0.21-0.82, <0.05). : One in five urban residents have depressive symptoms during the COVID-19 epidemic, and a short nap during the day may be a protective factor against depressive symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Risk Factors , Urban Population
3.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-329084

ABSTRACT

This study aims to investigate the impact of COVID-19 lockdown on lifestyle behaviors and depressive symptom among patients with NCDs.We incorporated a COVID-19 survey to the WELL China cohort, a prospective cohort study with the baseline survey conducted 8–16 months before the COVID-19 outbreak in Hangzhou, China. The COVID-19 survey was carried out to collect information on lifestyle and depressive symptom during lockdown.A total of 3,327 participants were included in the COVID-19 survey, including 2,098 (63.1%) reported having NCDs at baseline and 1,457 (44%) without NCDs. The prevalence of current drinkers decreased from 42.9% before COVID-19 lockdown to 23.7% during lockdown, current smokers from 15.9–13.5%, and poor sleepers from 23.9–15.3%, while low physical activity increased from 13.4–25.2%, among participants with NCDs. Participants with NCDs were more likely than those without to have depressive symptom (OR, 1.30;95% CI, 1.05–1.61), especially among those who need to refill their medication during the COVID-19 lockdown (OR, 1.52;95% CI, 1.15–2.02).Our findings provide insight into the development of targeted interventions to better prepare patients with NCDs and healthcare system to meet the challenge of future pandemic and lockdown, which is highly likely to happen in the near future.

4.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-312194

ABSTRACT

Background: During the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with non-communicable diseases (NCDs), even without symptoms or a diagnosis of COVID-19, may be affected more than the general population due to the lockdown and healthcare service redistribution. This study aims to investigate the impact of COVID-19 lockdown on lifestyle behaviors and depressive symptom among patients with NCDs.Methods: We incorporated a COVID-19 survey to the WELL China cohort, a prospective cohort study with the baseline survey conducted 8-16 months before the COVID-19 outbreak in Hangzhou, China. The COVID-19 survey was carried out to collect information on lifestyle and depressive symptom during lockdown.Findings: A total of 3,327 participants were included in the COVID-19 survey, including 2,098 (63.1%) reported having NCDs at baseline and 1,457 (44%) without NCDs. The prevalence of current drinkers decreased from 42.9% before COVID-19 lockdown to 23.7% during lockdown, current smokers from 15.9% to 13.5%, and poor sleepers from 23.9% to 15.3%, while low physical activity increased from 13.4% to 25.2%, among participants with NCDs. Participants with NCDs were more likely than those without to have depressive symptom (OR, 1.30;95% CI, 1.05-1.61), especially among those who need to refill their medication during the COVID-19 lockdown (OR, 1.52;95% CI, 1.15-2.02).Interpretation: Our findings provide insight into the development of targeted interventions to better prepare patients with NCDs and healthcare system to meet the challenge of future pandemic and lockdown, which is highly likely to happen in the near future.Funding: Initial foundational funding for the Stanford Wellness Living laboratory (WELL) was provided by Amway via an unrestricted gift through the Nutrilite Health Institute Wellness Fund to Stanford University. Through Zhejiang University, the Cyrus Tang Foundation and Zhejiang University Education Foundation also provided important financial support for the study. The follow-up survey was supported by Hsun K. Chou Fund of Zhejiang University Education Foundation.Declaration of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.Ethical Approval: The WELL-China project was approved by the ethics review board at both Zhejiang University (No. ZGL201507-3) in China and Stanford University (IRB- 35020) in USA. All participants provided written informed consent. The follow-up telephone interview was further approved by the ethics review board at Zhejiang University (No. ZGL202004-01).

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